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  1. 20 Jul '08 17:24
    Hello,

    I did a lot of research on this subject with very little results. There are official rules for chess like the one from FIDE: http://www.fide.com/info/handbook?id=124&view=article

    But many of them make no sense in the context of correspondence chess. So I found some revisions for correspondence chess, including:

    - It IS allowed to use any kind of literature during the game, for example a book about openings or endgames, Wikipedia and so on.
    - Chess AIs are disallowed in SOME communities, including this one.

    But I found extremely controversial information about these open questions:

    - Is it legal to use game explorers like this one: http://www.redhotpawn.com/gamesexplorer/index.php
    - Is it legal to "try" moves on a real board, the redhotpawn analysis screen (why else would it work during a game?) or similar? In FICS it is clearly disallowed, but that's not correspondence chess. "Hovering" a piece before dropping it to the destination square but then deciding not to commit the move is a grey area in all online chess rules I found.

    Also, shouldn't the rules (or at least the delta to FIDE) be a huge main menu link? All I found was the statement about not using chess AIs.

    Kai
  2. 20 Jul '08 18:00
    Originally posted by Magnakai
    Hello,

    I did a lot of research on this subject with very little results. There are official rules for chess like the one from FIDE: http://www.fide.com/info/handbook?id=124&view=article

    But many of them make no sense in the context of correspondence chess. So I found some revisions for correspondence chess, including:

    - It IS allowed to use any kin ...[text shortened]... be a huge main menu link? All I found was the statement about not using chess AIs.

    Kai
    Is it legal to use game explorers like this one: http://www.redhotpawn.com/gamesexplorer/index.php

    Yes, because if you read the TOS 3(b) it clearly says but you may reference books, databases consisting of previously played games between human players, and other pre-existing research materials.

    Is it legal to "try" moves on a real board, the redhotpawn analysis screen (why else would it work during a game?) or similar? In FICS it is clearly disallowed, but that's not correspondence chess. "Hovering" a piece before dropping it to the destination square but then deciding not to commit the move is a grey area in all online chess rules I found.

    What I fail to understand is how you can "hover" a piece in online correspondence chess, even if you weren't allowed to do that, there would be no way of enforcing this. And of course, why else would they even have an 'analysis board' feature?

    Also, shouldn't the rules (or at least the delta to FIDE) be a huge main menu link? All I found was the statement about not using chess AIs.

    FIDE (ICCF) rules are not for online correspondence chess sites like RHP, so their rules wouldn't apply correctly here.
  3. 20 Jul '08 19:29
    Hello,

    thanks a lot for the quick reply. You answered all my questions.

    The "hovering" applies to other online chess front ends. It means to drag a piece, but then decide not to drop it. In RHP it would be like making a move, but then not committing it and making a different move.

    It seems to be very clear to you that "trying" moves is legal. But many online communities (not for correspondence chess) disallow it, EVEN THOUGH it can obviously not be enforced.

    With the rules menu point I didn't mean for FIDE, I meant for the rules that are SPECIFIC for correspondence chess.

    Kai
  4. 20 Jul '08 21:07
    Originally posted by Magnakai

    With the rules menu point I didn't mean for FIDE, I meant for the rules that are SPECIFIC for correspondence chess.

    Kai[/b]
    Yes, well even ICCF Rules can't really be applied to RHP.
  5. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    20 Jul '08 23:55
    Originally posted by Magnakai
    Hello,

    thanks a lot for the quick reply. You answered all my questions.

    The "hovering" applies to other online chess front ends. It means to drag a piece, but then decide not to drop it. In RHP it would be like making a move, but then not committing it and making a different move.

    It seems to be very clear to you that "trying" moves is legal. But m ...[text shortened]... n't mean for FIDE, I meant for the rules that are SPECIFIC for correspondence chess.

    Kai
    ive taken this one a bit further even.. sometimes i make a move, and my computer lags and doesnt except it, and i decide to do a different one.. this is very rare, my comp. doesnt do this anymore as i clear cashe