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  1. 21 Aug '13 20:59
    An opponent passed my pawn. In a normal board game I would have the option of taking his pawn and moving the capturing piece into the space if I had just taken it. However the move doesn't seem to be allowed. Help
  2. Donation mwmiller
    RHP Member No. 16
    21 Aug '13 21:56 / 4 edits
    Originally posted by Perpeka
    An opponent passed my pawn. In a normal board game I would have the option of taking his pawn and moving the capturing piece into the space if I had just taken it. However the move doesn't seem to be allowed. Help
    A passed pawn is a pawn with no opposing pawns to prevent it from advancing to the eighth rank.
    I think you are trying to describe "en passant" which is totally different than a passed pawn.
    I looked at your active games and do not see any en passant situations.
    I think you should take a few minutes and check out the rules.

    Here's a link: Help : enpassant

    That's all I can say about it, as this is an active game.
  3. 21 Aug '13 22:23
    yes indeed my memory is failing - en passant is correct. And if you can see my active game with elifer you will see he has moved his kings pawn one square past my pawn (not 2). Does not the en passant rule apply here as well?
  4. Donation mwmiller
    RHP Member No. 16
    21 Aug '13 22:58
    Originally posted by Perpeka
    yes indeed my memory is failing - en passant is correct. And if you can see my active game with elifer you will see he has moved his kings pawn one square past my pawn (not 2). Does not the en passant rule apply here as well?
    We do not comment on games in progress because some folks may take that as giving a player help during a game. It's kind of a gray area sometimes and I am probably getting close to crossing the line.

    If you look closely at that link in my first post and compare it to your ongoing game you will surely see that there is a difference. Read the rule very closely, compare the squares involved, and you will answer your own question. It only applies to a very specific move made by a pawn on it's first move in a game.

    Here's some more history on the "en passant" move. Surely this will help answer your question!

    En passant (from French: in passing)
    It is a special pawn capture which can occur immediately after a player moves a pawn two squares forward from its starting position, and an enemy pawn could have captured it had the same pawn moved only one square forward. The opponent captures the just-moved pawn as if taking it "as it passes" through the first square. The resulting position is the same as if the pawn had moved only one square forward and the enemy pawn had captured normally.

    The en passant capture must be done on the very next turn, or the right to do so is lost. Such a move is the only occasion in chess in which a piece captures but does not move to the square of the captured piece. If an en passant capture is the only legal move available, it must be made. En passant capture is a common theme in chess compositions.

    This rule was added in the 15th century when the rule giving pawns the option of initially moving two squares was introduced. It prevents a pawn from using the two-square advance to pass an adjacent enemy pawn without the risk of being captured.
  5. 22 Aug '13 00:14
    Thank you for the explanation, and education. I will remember it in all future games.
  6. 22 Aug '13 15:02
    Your profile says you are seven and a half??
  7. Subscriber Kewpie
    chess dummy
    23 Aug '13 04:42
    Originally posted by MontyMoose
    Your profile says you are seven and a half??
    How many seven-year-olds do you know with a vocabulary of four-syllable words?