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  1. 25 Sep '06 21:49
    In a current game, the my opponents king is on g1, his rook on f2 is pinned by my queen on d4. Obviously, his rook cannot move without my queen moving, his king moving or another piece coming in between.
    I am trying to move my king from g4 to f4 and the computer won't let me (pink squares and my king automatically moves back to g4).
    Is this a computer/RHP problem or is this a common "rule of chess?"

    My simple logic is that, since the rook is pinned, it can't "exert" check on the f4 square so that the move should be legal. Any help?
  2. Standard member MCA
    TokerSmurf
    25 Sep '06 22:02 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Rocky Hiccups
    In a current game, the my opponents king is on g1, his rook on f2 is pinned by my queen on d4. Obviously, his rook cannot move without my queen moving, his king moving or another piece coming in between.
    I am trying to move my king from g4 to f4 and the computer won't let me (pink squares and my king automatically moves back to g4).
    Is this a comput nned, it can't "exert" check on the f4 square so that the move should be legal. Any help?
    I presume it is the game you have against dgw567.

    If so then try playing the moves out and you will see that if the game allowed the king to be taken, then his rook would take your king at the first opportunity. Even though this would place him in check it wouldn't matter because the game is finished ... you lost your king.

    You cannot move and allow check under any circumstances or you immediately lose the game when your opponent plays.

    [edit: just to clarify, yes this is a common rule of chess and not specific to this site]
  3. 26 Sep '06 03:09
    MCA-- Thanks for the answer. It does make sense, I suppose. It's just that the rook CAN'T move to take my king because it would put him in check. Therefore, it should be an acceptable move for me to make (in my opinion anyways).

    Again, thanks for taking the time.
  4. Standard member XanthosNZ
    Cancerous Bus Crash
    26 Sep '06 06:21
    Originally posted by Rocky Hiccups
    MCA-- Thanks for the answer. It does make sense, I suppose. It's just that the rook CAN'T move to take my king because it would put him in check. Therefore, it should be an acceptable move for me to make (in my opinion anyways).

    Again, thanks for taking the time.
    http://www.chessvariants.com/d.chess/chess.html

    Pinned pieces can still exert checks.
  5. 26 Sep '06 18:19
    Originally posted by Rocky Hiccups
    [b]In a current game, the my opponents king is on g1, his rook on f2 is pinned by my queen on d4. I am trying to move my king from g4 to f4 and the computer won't let me (pink squares and my king automatically moves back to g4).
    My simple logic is that, since the rook is pinned, it can't "exert" check on the f4 square so that the move should be legal.
    From the Laws of Chess
    http://fide.com/official/handbook.asp?level=EE101

    Article 3: The moves of the pieces
    3.1 (part) A piece is considered to attack a square, even if such a piece is constrained from moving to that square because it would then leave or place the king of its own colour under attack.

    As MCA pointed out, if the game did actually require the King to be captured, your violation of the Laws by moving into check would allow the Rook to "capture" your King while your opponent's King was still on the board, so your's would be taken first.
  6. Standard member MCA
    TokerSmurf
    26 Sep '06 20:34
    Originally posted by Rocky Hiccups
    It's just that the rook CAN'T move to take my king because it would put him in check. Therefore, it should be an acceptable move for me to make (in my opinion anyways).
    You are using one rule for you and then another for your opponent. Lets say you ARE allowed to move your rook and place yourself in check ... then why would he NOT be allowed to do the same in order to take your king???

    It is pretty clear and I cant see how it can be seen in any other way, so once again just for clarity:

    If you were to move your rook and leave yourself in check, on his next move he would take your king. It would not matter that this left his king in check because you do not get to play on & take his king ... the game is over ... you lose ... you lost your king before he did.
  7. 27 Sep '06 03:19
    Ok, I get it. Thanks for the answers.