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  1. 10 Dec '06 11:13
    Is it not the case that when a player sacrifices all players except the king, and then makes ten complete moves without being check mated, a stale mate?
  2. Standard member MCA
    TokerSmurf
    10 Dec '06 11:35
    Originally posted by Mmarch
    Is it not the case that when a player sacrifices all players except the king, and then makes ten complete moves without being check mated, a stale mate?
    no.

    I think you may be thinking of another rule which causes a draw after 50 move without a piece being taken or a pawn being moved.

    You should check this FAQ for further information.
  3. Donation mwmiller
    RHP Member No. 16
    10 Dec '06 14:20
    I don't think this is covered in the FAQ, but here is a definition from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

    "Stalemate is a situation in chess where the player whose turn it is to move has no legal moves but is not in check."

    It is usually considered a draw.
  4. Standard member Phlabibit
    Mystic Meg
    10 Dec '06 14:48
    Originally posted by mwmiller
    I don't think this is covered in the FAQ, but here is a definition from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

    "Stalemate is a situation in chess where the player whose turn it is to move has no legal moves but is not in check."

    It is usually considered a draw.
    Usually?

    P-
  5. 10 Dec '06 14:52
    Originally posted by Phlabibit
    Usually?

    P-
    Unusually?
  6. 10 Dec '06 14:54 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Mmarch
    Is it not the case that when a player sacrifices all players except the king, and then makes ten complete moves without being check mated, a stale mate?
    Stalemate is when the only squares that the king can move too, would put it in check; and because it's impossible for you to put your king in check the game is drawn. Or when he's blocked in by his own pieces or enemy pieces. The king must be your only piece that can't move though otherwise the game can still go on. For example, if you can move even one pawn but your king can't move it's not considered stalemate.
    Well hope this helped!

    -- Paul (Pavlo87)
  7. 10 Dec '06 15:18
    Simply put;
    Stalemate is when it's your turn, you are not in check and have no legal move.
  8. 10 Dec '06 16:41
    Originally posted by Dr Strangelove
    Simply put;
    Stalemate is when it's your turn, you are not in check and have no legal move.
    As said above oops.
  9. 10 Dec '06 16:51
    Originally posted by Phlabibit
    Usually?

    P-
    I am sure many games are played in which stalemate is not considered a draw because the players don't know the rules.
  10. Donation mwmiller
    RHP Member No. 16
    10 Dec '06 17:15 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Phlabibit
    Usually?

    P-
    The entire quote from wikipedia is as follows:

    "Stalemate is a situation in chess where the player whose turn it is to move has no legal moves but is not in check. Stalemate ends the game, with the result a draw. However, in certain variants, such as suicide chess, stalemate is not necessarily a draw, and is deemed a win for either (a) the player with fewer pieces (a draw results if the players have the same number of pieces) or (b) the stalemated player."

    Therefore I said "usually".
    As we only play correspondence chess here I would say for our purposes a stalemate would be a draw.
  11. 11 Dec '06 11:20 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Mmarch
    Is it not the case that when a player sacrifices all players except the king, and then makes ten complete moves without being check mated, a stale mate?
    From 'FIDE Laws of Chess'
    http://fide.com/official/handbook.asp?level=EE101
    "Article 5.2 The game is drawn when the player to move has no legal move and his king is not in check. The game is said to end in `stalemate`. This immediately ends the game, provided that the move producing the stalemate position was legal."