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  1. Subscriber Twirly
    Life long novice
    14 Oct '15 01:06
    I just became a subscriber. The reason I did was to play in tournaments. I just assumed that when the tournament started I'd have to play 3 or 4 games at a time and if I won I'd move on to the next round, but when I logged on today I had over 40 games to play!!!! It looks like I'm playing everyone in the tournament twice!

    So, will someone please explain to me how the tournaments work. I'm feeling a little overwhelmed and a little stupid for not knowing what I was getting into.

    Thanks.
  2. Subscriber Kewpie
    chess dummy
    14 Oct '15 02:08
    First of all, each opponent has 1 black and 1 white game.
    Tournaments come in duels (2), threesomes, quartets and octets. To find the number of games you'll get in round 1, deduct 1 and multiply by 2:
    duel: 2
    threesome: 4
    quartet: 6
    octet: 14

    It doesn't take long to mount up if you join three or four tournaments at the same time.

    A gameload of 40 isn't too bad if they have 3-day - or more - time controls. You only have to make 1 move every three days in each game.
  3. Donation mwmiller
    RHP Member No. 16
    14 Oct '15 02:18
    Originally posted by Twirly
    I just became a subscriber. The reason I did was to play in tournaments. I just assumed that when the tournament started I'd have to play 3 or 4 games at a time and if I won I'd move on to the next round, but when I logged on today I had over 40 games to play!!!! It looks like I'm playing everyone in the tournament twice!

    So, will someone please explain to ...[text shortened]... ing a little overwhelmed and a little stupid for not knowing what I was getting into.

    Thanks.
    You need to study and understand the details included for each particular tournament.
    Pay particular attention to the group size. Each person in the group usually will play two games against each other person in that group. One game as black an one as white.
    So a small group size would result in what you were probably expecting.

    So for example if the group size is 6, then that means it will be you and five others in a group. You will play 2 games against each of those other 5 players in your group so that will be 10 games. The total number of players will determine how many groups there are.

    Once all groups have finished all of their games for the round, the winners will be advanced to the next round and new groups will be formed and new games will start as before, with each person playing two games against every other person in that new group.

    So mainly look at the group size and the time controls. Some tournaments can take a long time to finish.

    Does that help. If not then maybe someone else can explain it better.
  4. Subscriber Twirly
    Life long novice
    14 Oct '15 02:23
    Originally posted by Kewpie
    First of all, each opponent has 1 black and 1 white game.
    Tournaments come in duels (2), threesomes, quartets and octets. To find the number of games you'll get in round 1, deduct 1 and multiply by 2:
    duel: 2
    threesome: 4
    quartet: 6
    octet: 14

    It doesn't take long to mount up if you join three or four tournaments at the same time.

    A gameload of 4 ...[text shortened]... ve 3-day - or more - time controls. You only have to make 1 move every three days in each game.
    Thanks so much for clearing that up. Please, understand that I wasn't complaining. I just had no idea it was going to be that many games.

    So, after round one is played (and say I win some and loose some) then what happens? How does round two and so on progress? Is there only one round and whoever wins the most wins the tournament?

    I know I probably sound like an idiot, but I really appreciate the info.

    Thanks a lot.
  5. Subscriber Twirly
    Life long novice
    14 Oct '15 02:27
    Originally posted by mwmiller
    You need to study and understand the details included for each particular tournament.
    Pay particular attention to the group size. Each person in the group usually will play two games against each other person in that group. One game as black an one as white.
    So a small group size would result in what you were probably expecting.

    So for example if the ...[text shortened]... a long time to finish.

    Does that help. If not then maybe someone else can explain it better.
    Thank you so much for the info.

    That helps quite a bit. I'm still not sure how the next rounds progress. Say I win 40% of my games and loose 60%... Will I go on to round 2?

    I know I'm an idiot. Thanks for taking the time to help.
  6. Subscriber Kewpie
    chess dummy
    14 Oct '15 02:38 / 2 edits
    For each group in the tournament, the player who wins the most points will advance to the next round. If two players share the top spot, both advance. You can see the current state of the players if you click on the tourney name in your game, or you can go to the Tournaments page and click on MyTournaments to see all the tourneys you are currently in. Round 2 starts automatically when all the results of Round 1 are known to the computer program.

    Some tournaments have "Grand" in the name, they're likely to have a LOT of players and you've managed to get yourself into at least one of those. When you click on the name of an available tournament, it pays to check the group size and the time controls to ensure that it's suitable for you. Some tourneys have very fast time controls, for example 1 day per move and no timebank (reserve time).

    Help : tourn
  7. Subscriber Twirly
    Life long novice
    14 Oct '15 02:46
    Originally posted by Kewpie
    For each group in the tournament, the player who wins the most points will advance to the next round. If two players share the top spot, both advance. You can see the current state of the players if you click on the tourney name in your game, or you can go to the Tournaments page and click on MyTournaments to see all the tourneys you are currently in. Round 2 starts automatically when all the results of Round 1 are known to the computer program.
    You've been a huge help. I think I can figure it out from here.

    Thanks again.