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Hikaru Junction

Hikaru Junction

Chess Blog

Trawling the Internet

I, casting my net over the waves of the World Wide Web today, found two awesome things. One is a game online, played by GM Max Dlugy while he commentates live. The only unusual part? Dlugy loses!

Here is the video:

Voa9QwiBJwE


The game:...

Canadian Chess

I was in Montreal and Edmonton each to watch the semifinal games of the Women’s World Cup. (My condolences, Laura Bassett.) I have a chess story from each. In Montreal, I visited an interesting cafe named Café Pi.

Café Pi Outside


Café Pi Outside


(Both pictures from http://en.chessbase.com/post/montreal-open-a-labor-of-love) ...

GM Walter Browne

RIP Walter Browne.

http://en.chessbase.com/post/walter-browne-dies-in-his-sleep-at-66

Here are two games of his.

Walter Browne–Kerry Lawless San Francisco 1969 ...

The CANdidates Tournament

As Caruana and Nakamura have freshly qualified for the Candidates tournament along with last year’s challenger, Anand, let’s take a look at a brilliant game each.

Caruana!


Tibor Fogarasi–Fabiano Caruana Budapest 2007
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. Nc3 Qc7 {Black, having neglected development to take away squares from the White knights, can safely put the queen here.} 6. Bd3 {White puts the bishop on an active diagonal and overprotects e4.} Nf6
7. O-O Bc5 8. Nb3 {The knight retreats to gain a tempo on the bishop and assist a possible f5-push.} Ba7 {The bishop moves to avoid capture.} 9. Kh1 {To get off the a7-g1 diagonal, and so prepare f2-f4.} Nc6 10. Bg5 h5 {Black begins the attack.} 11. Bxf6 gxf6
12. f4 {...

Oddities and Development

First of all, I apologize for not putting up a post in a long time. A month. I’ve been really busy, and I’ll post more often now.

We go to a few of the stranger positions I have recently had. (sorry if this seems a tad egotistical)

golddog2-HikaruShindo RHP 2015
2k5/p4p2/2p2p2/2p3p1/5p2/1K5P/3r2P1/8 w - - 0 34

Here golddog2 sportingly resigned. However, I was hoping for a chance to round up the h- and g-pawns. Black would then have seven (!) passed pawns, along with a strikingly bad pawn structure...

The RHP [A]CW

Today, American Civil War generals do battle. Lee versus Grant! Curiously enough, there are three players in the United States Chess Federation Database named…Grant Lee! (http://www.uschess.org/datapage/player-search.php?name=Lee%2C+Grant&state=ANY&ratingmin=&ratingmax=&order=N&rating=R&mode=Find)


Lee

http://blogs.loc.gov/civil-war-voices/about/robert-e-lee/
Lee
versus ...
The final part of the series! C. H. O’D. Alexander played Alekhine four times. Alekhine was better, of world champion status, but Alexander managed to draw twice! In my opinion the more instructive of these draws is as follows:

Alexander Alekhine–Conel Hugh O'Donel Alexander Hastings 1933/34
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 {The somewhat drawish Petroff.} 3. d4 {An interesting and slightly livelier way to play this than 3. Nxe5} Nxe4 4. Bd3 d5 5. Nxe5 Bd6 {However, we return to the mirror.} 6. O-O O-O 7. c4 Nc6 {This make some sense. Black will comfortably regain the pawn after 8…Nxd4.} 8. cxd5 Nxd4 9. Bxe4 Bxe5 10. f4 Bf6 11. Nc3 Bf5 {More pieces come off. Black induces a slightly favorable trade of the bishops while developing.}
12. Qd3 Bxe4 13. Nxe4 Qxd5 14. Nxf6+ gxf6 {Alexander accepts the...

C. H. O'D pt. 2–Smoking Botvinnik+Pipes–Bletchley Park

This section thanks to moonbus, who pm’ed me with the moves and pictures of a chess set he owns that was used by A. L. Moir in a simul against C. H. O’D Alexander. Thanks, moonbus!

THe pieces touched by two British champions!


The knight and rook can be identified as the kingside K and R for notation purposes


C. H. O’D Alexander–Rev. A. L. Moir 1953 Simultaneous ...

C.H.O'D. pt.1: Blunders–Bletchley Park

Alan Turing wrote the algorithm for Turochamp, but wasn’t a particularly prolific player in his own right. One of his colleagues–C.H.O’D. Alexander–was. He is a particularly undervalued player today–although some claim he had Grandmaster potential, his peak years overlapped with World War Two, when he was needed for codebreaking and the opportunities for international play were limited. His best tournament was Hastings 1953/54, where he tied David Bronstein for first, beating Bronstein and Tulosh (a Soviet grandmaster). Also in 1954(Albeit not in the same tournament), he produced this entertaining miniature against Milev (the 1952 champion of Bulgaria.)

Conel Hugh O’Donel Alexander–Zdravko Milev 1954
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 {All standard so far.} 6.Bd3 e5 7.Nd...

Alan Turing–Bletchley Park

Ads for The Imitation Game were everywhere, inspiring this post, during the weeks preceding its release. However, this Alan Turing-centric movie leaves out, for the masses, one important thing: the chess. Alan Turing, according to chessgames.com, wrote a chess program:

“…working with his former undergraduate colleague, D.G. Champernowne, Turing began writing a chess playing algorithm. In 1952, lacking a computer powerful enough to execute the program, Turing played a game against Alick Glennie, in which he simulated the computer, taking about 30 minutes per move. The program lost that game, although it is reported that it scored a victory against Champernowne's wife.”

Although the computer would not function due to the lack of processing power, Turing used a paper and pencil to c...
Last Post 08 Sep '18
Posts 52
Blog since 27 Mar '15