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Culture Forum

Culture Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    15 Jan '14 00:41
    http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2013/12/bloc-partys-kele-okereke-to-release-first-3d-print.html

    I am not a fan of the music they made but it is astounding you can do that at all.
  2. Subscriber Suzianne
    Misfit Queen
    19 Feb '14 21:46
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2013/12/bloc-partys-kele-okereke-to-release-first-3d-print.html

    I am not a fan of the music they made but it is astounding you can do that at all.
    I had no idea they have that kind of resolution.

    That is amazing.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    25 Feb '14 22:32
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    I had no idea they have that kind of resolution.

    That is amazing.
    It for SURE is amazing, mind blowing! I think they make the grooves using straight lines, like the old CRT tv's that had a beam of electrons sweeping left and right then down a step and repeat so the resolution has to be near atomic level!

    What I wonder is how far can you go with such technology? For instance, the real McCoy has a groove cut in by a powered needle and such so it marks a space on the record.

    What I wonder is how well the sound would be compared to a real vinyl record. We all know the sound coming off a good vinyl system beats CD's and MP3 players hands down, I still have 2000 vinyls and a great turntable to play those records on so I can attest to how well they CAN sound. Of course when they get scratches the sound quality goes down and the clicks and such. It turns out though, if you are really worried about it, software like Wavelab can remove the clicks and scratches and make an old record sound a lot better.

    So if you had some good analysis test equipment, I wonder how the sound would compare to the same sound recorded on a real traditionally made vinyl?

    My guess is, since this is the first shot over the bow, so to speak, it will sound inferior, but later more resolution printers might be able to totally match the beauty of real vinyl sound.