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Culture Forum

Culture Forum

  1. Standard member yo its me
    watch the acid...
    07 Mar '08 14:32
    Those are very imposing buildings. There aren'y buildings here in my town that I especially like. But Grand designs had the lovellyest building ever in one of it's episodes. Do you watch it? http://www.channel4.com/4homes/ontv/grand-designs/index.html
    There was this wood owner who needed to build a home for himself but there were such restrictions that he had to build it organically. He made the house with the trees off the land. That was inspirational to me.
  2. Standard member Sunburnt
    Leopard Girl
    07 Mar '08 15:11 / 1 edit
    Without a doubt, the Robert Frost Farm is the most inspiring building in my town. It is a very typical farmhouse structure that is so common where I live, and I love them all. Especially the ones that are fading away and slanted. Robert Frost was a very gifted poet, of course, and his farmhouse is now a public property. I take my children there to walk the trails and picnic. Dogs allowed .

    http://www.robertfrostfarm.org/


    My love for farms is simple. I love churches, monasteries, cathedrals, etc. To me, nothing equals the genius and beauty of gothic cathedrals. When I look at them, I feel powerful emotion. I find it incredible that this sort of achitecture was accomplished in the middle ages and is just so gorgeous.

    Here is just one example - Wells Cathedral:

    http://www.racine.ra.it/ungaretti/gothic/wells_cathedral.htm
  3. Standard member rbmorris
    Vampyroteuthis
    07 Mar '08 20:51 / 2 edits
    I've always loved Trinity Church in Boston. It's a beautiful building on its own, but I particularly like the way it reflects off the mirrored surface of the Hancock building....the juxtaposition of old versus new:

    http://tinyurl.com/yvu4lx
    http://tinyurl.com/24odsg

    Note: In the second picture above, you can sort of see how the back of the Hancock tower is angled in such a way so that if you look at it from a certain angle, it appears to be a single sheet of glass rising up into the sky.

    I also really like the silver art-deco spire of the Chrysler Building in New York.

    http://tinyurl.com/yo2chh
    http://tinyurl.com/co4j3
  4. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    07 Mar '08 21:49
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    Toronto has very few...none that would rank on a world scale.

    We tore most of the older buildings down in the 60's 70's in favour of concrete and steel. Hollowed out the city. What was once interesting architecture has been replaced with functionality for as cheap as possible. Form and substance has been swept aside in favour of cheap and easy.

    There have been recent attempts to revive a sense of place within toronto with changes to some of the buildings that house the cultural institutes of Toronto, most notably the Royal Ontario Museum, but tangible evidence of improvement is scarce.

    The condo explosion has seen to it that Toronto's architectureal landscape will increasingly become more and more mediocre as collectivism is replaced with individualism. Another sad comment on the loss of idealism in this City and country.
  5. Standard member Sunburnt
    Leopard Girl
    07 Mar '08 22:15
    Originally posted by rbmorris
    I've always loved Trinity Church in Boston. It's a beautiful building on its own, but I particularly like the way it reflects off the mirrored surface of the Hancock building....the juxtaposition of old versus new:

    http://tinyurl.com/yvu4lx
    http://tinyurl.com/24odsg

    Note: In the second picture above, you can sort of see how the back of the Hancock t ...[text shortened]... of the Chrysler Building in New York.

    http://tinyurl.com/yo2chh
    http://tinyurl.com/co4j3
    Nice pic. I love that entire area of Beacon Hill. I couldn't find any good pics of brownstones.


    I don't know why, but I don't get art deco much. It's a period of time in decor, architecture, style, etc that I find so uninspiring....what's wrong with me!?
  6. Standard member rbmorris
    Vampyroteuthis
    07 Mar '08 23:29
    Originally posted by Sunburnt
    I don't know why, but I don't get art deco much. It's a period of time in decor, architecture, style, etc that I find so uninspiring....what's wrong with me!?
    I think it helps if you enjoy the era when they were popular. I like F. Scott Fitzgerald, Somerset Maugham...etc., and love reading about things that occurred during that time period. I think that makes a difference, if you're like me and you sort of romanticize that whole era in your head.
  7. Standard member neonpeon41
    The Conductor
    08 Mar '08 03:00
    Originally posted by uzless
    Toronto has very few...none that would rank on a world scale.

    We tore most of the older buildings down in the 60's 70's in favour of concrete and steel. Hollowed out the city. What was once interesting architecture has been replaced with functionality for as cheap as possible. Form and substance has been swept aside in favour of cheap and easy.

    There ...[text shortened]... ed with individualism. Another sad comment on the loss of idealism in this City and country.
    I loved touring Casa Loma when I visited Toronto.
  8. Standard member neonpeon41
    The Conductor
    08 Mar '08 03:31
    I think one of the most impressive in Indianapolis is the Scottish-Rite Cathedral. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Indianapolis_Scottish_Rite_Cathedral.jpg

    I believe Indianapolis has more war memorials than any other city in the U.S. other than D.C. Here are a couple of the bigger ones.

    WWI memorial on the other side of the war memorial mall.
    http://photos.igougo.com/pictures-photos-l779-c4-p319097-War_Memorial.html

    Soldier and Sailor Monument on Monument Circle. In Dec. it becomes world's largest Christmas Tree.
    http://photos.igougo.com/pictures-photos-l779-c4-p319092-Soldier_and_Sailors_Monument.html

    Indianapolis's newest addition to the skyline:
    http://lucasoilstadium.oxblue.com/
  9. Standard member nmdavidb
    I Drank What? ©
    08 Mar '08 04:02
    Don't forget my people!

    http://www.bradrand.com/Pages/redneck_page.htm

    hehehe

    Dave
  10. Standard member rbmorris
    Vampyroteuthis
    08 Mar '08 04:55 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by nmdavidb
    Don't forget my people!

    http://www.bradrand.com/Pages/redneck_page.htm

    hehehe

    Dave
    I really wish the North had lost the Civil War.

    edit - I guess we sort of did.
  11. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    08 Mar '08 06:00
    Originally posted by neonpeon41
    I loved touring Casa Loma when I visited Toronto.
    One of the few..but that building serves no real function other than as a tourist trap. None of the locals go there.

    I'm talking more about buildings that inspire the local population.
  12. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    08 Mar '08 13:10 / 1 edit
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    In my home town Porto, the riverside view is breathtaking (ok, ok, I'm biased), and the D. Luis metal bridge cuts through the landscape beautifully. Here are two pics, one of the riverside and the other one including the bridge. It's hard to find a photo that captures both at the same time, as the bridge is off to one side of the riverside. Which live is actually nice as it doesn't cut through the view but completes the scenario's background.

    http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Europe/Portugal/North/Porto/Porto/photo778179.htm
    http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Europe/Portugal/North/Porto/Porto/photo455195.htm
    http://i1.trekearth.com/photos/56595/img_2223.jpg


    Internationally, it's hard to chose from such a great variety of great buildings. Since I'm a hardcore Gaudi fan, I'd chose Park Guell, but since it isn't a building in the conventional sense, I'll go with Sagrada Familia in Barcelona. Because Gaudi died before finishing it, the construction is still ongoing after an interruption of many years. This makes it hard to find a panoramic view without some cranes sticking out.
    http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/photo350682.htm
    http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/photo439839.htm
  13. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    08 Mar '08 13:12
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    To be honest, I would be pressed to find a colder building that the town hall in Leeds that you mentioned. It's just big and imposing.
  14. Standard member Sunburnt
    Leopard Girl
    08 Mar '08 14:36
    Originally posted by rbmorris
    I think it helps if you enjoy the era when they were popular. I like F. Scott Fitzgerald, Somerset Maugham...etc., and love reading about things that occurred during that time period. I think that makes a difference, if you're like me and you sort of romanticize that whole era in your head.
    I have no romance in my head for the 20's and 30's.
  15. Standard member Sunburnt
    Leopard Girl
    08 Mar '08 14:41
    Originally posted by nmdavidb
    Don't forget my people!

    http://www.bradrand.com/Pages/redneck_page.htm

    hehehe

    Dave
    One surprising discovery I have made this year is that not ALL rednecks are gross and stupid.