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  1. Subscribermoonbus
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    17 Jun '20 12:08
    I just watched this (three years after release). I'm a big fan of the original, but have mixed feelings about the sequel (too long, for instance, too much just looking at imaginary scenery). What does anyone else think of the sequel?
  2. YNWA
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    18 Jun '20 14:551 edit
    @moonbus said
    I just watched this (three years after release). I'm a big fan of the original, but have mixed feelings about the sequel (too long, for instance, too much just looking at imaginary scenery). What does anyone else think of the sequel?
    Maybe the thing for me was the extent to which I expected not to like it. Loved Blade Runner so much and it stood alone so well (completely fulfilling it's purpose) that I went in to the second one basically already prepared to moan about the rampant forces of commercialism... In fact I liked it a lot.

    I thought it was atmospheric, but also took the core theme to a new level by creating a different interface with what may or may not have been life. I thought it was clever the way it let you discover who was in fact their child, if indeed that was who was in fact was their child, since the male character was as much about her memories just as she was, in the same way as her/their mother was in fact a being from the memories of another. Again a genuine extra twist of the core twist.
  3. Subscribermoonbus
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    20 Jun '20 09:141 edit
    @petewxyz

    Thanks for your comments.

    I found the film very timely in respect of how a society treats its underclass and de-humanizes slaves. The 'real people' in the film assume that replicants do not have souls, and the replicants believe this, too. It reminds me of a quote from James Baldwin: "The real tragedy of prejudice is that the victims themselves eventually believe it."
  4. YNWA
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    20 Jun '20 11:29
    @moonbus said
    @petewxyz

    Thanks for your comments.

    I found the film very timely in respect of how a society treats its underclass and de-humanizes slaves. The 'real people' in the film assume that replicants do not have souls, and the replicants believe this, too. It reminds me of a quote from James Baldwin: "The real tragedy of prejudice is that the victims themselves eventually believe it."
    Nice to be given the opportunity to discuss it, thanks, these are very special films for me.

    Sadly you mention a theme which seems timely and yet timeless as well, but maybe the contrast between the potential we have and the things that we recurrently in fact do with it, with little regard even for the real existence others, is what for me had resonance with the atmosphere and context. Like the beauty of the scenery they fly off into at the end of the first movie, maybe it was preferable not to know how long they got in that paradise. "It's too bad she won't live, but then again who does?"
  5. Standard memberbadradger
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    20 Jun '20 12:45
    @moonbus said
    I just watched this (three years after release). I'm a big fan of the original, but have mixed feelings about the sequel (too long, for instance, too much just looking at imaginary scenery). What does anyone else think of the sequel?
    enjoyed the original but thought it inferior to the novel/the remake didnt float my boat at all.
  6. Subscribermoonbus
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    20 Jun '20 18:43
    @badradger said
    enjoyed the original but thought it inferior to the novel/the remake didnt float my boat at all.
    I did not read the book, so cannot comment on that. I guess I should read it, after all.

    The first movie was very atmospheric, very dark (L.A. always in rain), and the soundtrack was excellent (Vangelis). It gained iconic status for its vision of a dystopian future, and it really stands out for me as one of the all-time best sci-fi films.

    I don't think BR2049 hit that level again; still, I don't think it deserved the many bad reviews it got at Internet Movie Database. Most of the bad reviews panned it for being slow and boring. If those viewers expected relentless action (laser-sabre duels and star cruiser battles), they were looking at the wrong film; BR was never that sort of scifi. The newer film unfolds more like a Raymond Chandler novel than a JJ Abrams Star Trek reboot.
  7. Subscribermoonbus
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    20 Jun '20 19:10
    @petewxyz said
    Nice to be given the opportunity to discuss it, thanks, these are very special films for me.

    Sadly you mention a theme which seems timely and yet timeless as well, but maybe the contrast between the potential we have and the things that we recurrently in fact do with it, with little regard even for the real existence others, is what for me had resonance with the atmospher ...[text shortened]... to know how long they got in that paradise. "It's too bad she won't live, but then again who does?"
    I re-watched the first BR twice before plunging into the sequel, just to prime my memory. Did you know there were several versions released in a dvd boxed set? I watched two of them: the original original with Deckard's voice-over (very 1940s film-noir style -- think "Double Indemnity" ), and the so-called director's cut without the voice-over but with one previously cut scene. I liked the voice-over version better.

    I used to be annoyed that the Bogey film version of "The Big Sleep" left so many loose ends. (BTW, there was a reboot with Robt. Mitchum as the investigator and James Stewart as Gen. Sternwood). Until I read Chandler's book; the novel was that way, too, deliberately vague about how many crooks are involved and what their motives are. BR2049 has much of that Chandler-ish feel about it, with so many 'bad guys' trying to hunt down Deckard and clues which lead the replicant 'K' (and the viewer) astray.
  8. Bolton
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    27 Jun '20 14:47
    @moonbus said
    I just watched this (three years after release). I'm a big fan of the original, but have mixed feelings about the sequel (too long, for instance, too much just looking at imaginary scenery). What does anyone else think of the sequel?
    Both superb, Ridley Scot is a fantastic Director. Very emotional, especially the character 'Love'. She had to 'go'.
  9. YNWA
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    27 Jun '20 17:23
    @moonbus said
    I re-watched the first BR twice before plunging into the sequel, just to prime my memory. Did you know there were several versions released in a dvd boxed set? I watched two of them: the original original with Deckard's voice-over (very 1940s film-noir style -- think "Double Indemnity" ), and the so-called director's cut without the voice-over but with one previously c ...[text shortened]... ad guys' trying to hunt down Deckard and clues which lead the replicant 'K' (and the viewer) astray.
    Did the re-watching thing as well. One time with my daughters so we could watch the sequel together after. Big risk, they will happily take the p out of dad. They got it. Proud dad!
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