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Culture Forum

  1. Subscriber Pianoman1
    Nil desperandum
    01 Sep '13 08:44
    You are allowed ONE piece to take with you. What would it be?

    My decision changes daily, but I think there is one piece which for me never palls, and which would capture the beauty of every passing moment on so many different levels:

    J.S.Bach - B minor Mass

    How about you?
  2. 01 Sep '13 12:27
    Originally posted by Pianoman1
    You are allowed ONE piece to take with you. What would it be?

    My decision changes daily, but I think there is one piece which for me never palls, and which would capture the beauty of every passing moment on so many different levels:

    J.S.Bach - B minor Mass

    How about you?
    Excellent choice, but too short! Me: Der Ring des Nibelungen.
  3. Subscriber Pianoman1
    Nil desperandum
    01 Sep '13 13:20
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Excellent choice, but too short! Me: Der Ring des Nibelungen.
    Now why does that not surprise me?! I thought, obviously, about The Ring, but at the end of the day if there was one composer I simply could not do without it would not be Wagner (as passionate and addicted as I am to him) or Beethoven (who is probably my favourite composer) but J.S.Bach who satisfies on every level (unlike Wagner or Beethoven Bach can be just background wallpaper - for those days when you don't want an emotional whirlpool, a vortex of passion!)
  4. 01 Sep '13 14:03
    Originally posted by Pianoman1
    Now why does that not surprise me?! I thought, obviously, about The Ring, but at the end of the day if there was one composer I simply could not do without it would not be Wagner (as passionate and addicted as I am to him) or Beethoven (who is probably my favourite composer) but J.S.Bach who satisfies on every level (unlike Wagner or Beethoven Bach can be ...[text shortened]... nd wallpaper - for those days when you don't want an emotional whirlpool, a vortex of passion!)
    NO argument there. Every composer has some intriguing and subtle appeal unlike any other, a remarkable feat done with the same basic notes. Bach's B Minor mass is an incredible work and certainly worthy of any desert island, but it ends too quickly, leaves me wanting more. Perhaps Parsifal fulfills the B Minor Mass ideals in one fell swoop, underlining once and for all the essence of God's gifts in undistilled form, yet also highly concentrated as if purified by a higher hand. Parsifal would be my second choice. Beethoven's late quartets would be my third, although then I think of Schubert Lieder and salivate for the company of such gems on a desert island. So much great music, so little time. Brahm's late chamber music also comes to mind, all his clarinet music, especially the quintet and trio, but also his two sonatas. Then one wants to inject a little bombast into the island with Verdi's Requiem and Quattro Pezzi Sacri. Or a little von Weber with Der Freischutz, Berlioz' Les Toyens, Haydn's Creation. I need me a bigger island! One with a record store!
  5. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    01 Sep '13 20:50 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Pianoman1

    You are allowed ONE piece to take with you. What would it be?

    My decision changes daily, but I think there is one piece which for me never palls, and which would capture the beauty of every passing moment on so many different levels:

    J.S.Bach - B minor Mass

    How about you?
    With your kind permission, Pianoman1, one other would to join in the banqueting and endless revels on your picturesque Desert Island. While you, scacchipazzo and Jupiter rule the heavens above gb would dutifully perform the duties of handling the miscellaneous yet critical logistics of the acquisition and storage of all Youtube, DVD and Vinyl Records that may be required to your complete satisfaction. Additionally, he shall forage for Edible Mushrooms, Odd Roots (and Wild Berries for Dry Red Wine) for your sumptuous, groaning table. Should chess become an occasional whim, various shapes of pebbles and shells will be gathered; and a board constructed on a quiet beach at low tide. Awaiting your reply, as always...
  6. Subscriber Pianoman1
    Nil desperandum
    01 Sep '13 21:16
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    With your kind permission, Pianoman1, one other would to join in the banqueting and endless revels on your picturesque Desert Island. While you, scacchipazzo and Jupiter rule the heavens above gb would dutifully perform the duties of handling the miscellaneous yet critical logistics of the acquisition and storage of all Youtube, DVD and Vinyl Records th ...[text shortened]... w tides; and a board constructed on a quiet beach at low tide. Awaiting your reply, as always...
    Gb, your kind attention to the extraneous, albeit sine qua non luxuries on my desert island is, as always, much appreciated. After all, how shall I enjoy my Bach without the little side dishe, the amuse bouches, that would make this experience euphoric? But what music would YOU take?
  7. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    01 Sep '13 21:47 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Pianoman1
    Gb, your kind attention to the extraneous, albeit sine qua non luxuries on my desert island is, as always, much appreciated. After all, how shall I enjoy my Bach without the little side dishe, the amuse bouches, that would make this experience euphoric? But what music would YOU take?
    The aria from the exceptionally magnificent Caesar Opera I'm listening to at the moment
    (experiencing faint shivers; and moisture at the corner of one eye as we speak).
  8. 02 Sep '13 00:57 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    The aria from the exceptionally magnificent Caesar Opera I'm listening to at the moment
    (experiencing faint shivers; and moisture at the corner of one eye as we speak).
    Handel's Giulio Cesare is an extraordinary opera. Were you weirded out by the male soprano singing Caesar and do you know why this is cast for male soprano? As for arias, gotta be more specific since Giulio Cesare is so schockful of the greatest Handel ever wrote other than Messiah.
  9. Subscriber Pianoman1
    Nil desperandum
    02 Sep '13 06:10
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Handel's Giulio Cesare is an extraordinary opera. Were you weirded out by the male soprano singing Caesar and do you know why this is cast for male soprano? As for arias, gotta be more specific since Giulio Cesare is so schockful of the greatest Handel ever wrote other than Messiah.
    The more I read your comments the more I realise I have but tipped my toe into the vast ocean of classical music! How can I decide a piece to take with me when I am choosing from a tiny fraction of the repertoire? Do you mind me prying, since we are sharing a metaphorical desert island, into your musical past? Are you a musician, teacher, musicologist, or keen amateur?
  10. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    02 Sep '13 08:32
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Handel's Giulio Cesare is an extraordinary opera. Were you weirded out by the male soprano singing Caesar and do you know why this is cast for male soprano? As for arias, gotta be more specific since Giulio Cesare is so schockful of the greatest Handel ever wrote other than Messiah.
    "Handel's Giulio Cesare is an extraordinary opera. Were you weirded out by the male soprano singing Caesar [somewhat but its power engulfed me] and do you know why this is cast for male soprano? [Please tell me] As for arias, gotta be more specific since Giulio Cesare is so schockful of the greatest Handel ever wrote other than Messiah."[It was early in this 2013 Metropolitan Opera Series Sunday afternoon presentation on PBS. I'll try to find the Youtube before posting again.] Thanks.
  11. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    02 Sep '13 08:35
    Originally posted by Pianoman1
    The more I read your comments the more I realise I have but tipped my toe into the vast ocean of classical music! How can I decide a piece to take with me when I am choosing from a tiny fraction of the repertoire? Do you mind me prying, since we are sharing a metaphorical desert island, into your musical past? Are you a musician, teacher, musicologist, or keen amateur?
    The two of you seem to mesh and complement like Vermont and New Hampshire, in my opinion.
  12. 02 Sep '13 14:10
    Originally posted by Pianoman1
    The more I read your comments the more I realise I have but tipped my toe into the vast ocean of classical music! How can I decide a piece to take with me when I am choosing from a tiny fraction of the repertoire? Do you mind me prying, since we are sharing a metaphorical desert island, into your musical past? Are you a musician, teacher, musicologist, or keen amateur?
    I am but a rank amateur, keen, but know nary a technical thing about music. It all started as a child by being exposed to it by my father who knew even less than I do. He would get compilations via the records clubs or shortened versions of full works. I then went full pop/rock, played drums in a band. I had all but forgotten about classical, then Beatles Help album came out and George Martin quoted from Lohengrin and I again became intrigued by classical after first ignoring this track for years. Lasted only a minute. In 1986 I gave up smoking by treating myself to a fancy stereo. I also decided it was time to learn more about classical. I found all sorts of unwanted classical at garage sales and second hand record stores. My first non-second hand CD was Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture, which I won at our local classical station by answering trivia question about it. I then began reading copiously on music and its greats. Perhaps it was destiny in some ways. I made friends through my wife that knew some of the greats personally or had contact with those mentored by greats such as Toscanini(Verdi), Bruno Walter (Mahler). Such a friend grew up in an apartment previously occupied by Mahler then Walter. Her father was Toscanini's impresario. At any rate, I read avidly about music, listen to a wide variety of music by multiple composers.

    Indeed selecting a desert island disc is a tall task when it comes to classical for the repertoire is so vast! If I said Schubert lieder for a desert island disc it would be a very large box CD set with over 600 lieder, all jewels.
  13. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    02 Sep '13 18:42
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Handel's Giulio Cesare is an extraordinary opera. Were you weirded out by the male soprano singing Caesar and do you know why this is cast for male soprano? As for arias, gotta be more specific since Giulio Cesare is so schockful of the greatest Handel ever wrote other than Messiah.
    "Handel's Giulio Cesare is an extraordinary opera. Were you weirded out by the male soprano singing Caesar [somewhat but its power engulfed me]

    ... and do you know why this is cast for male soprano? [Please tell me]

    As for arias, gotta be more specific since Giulio Cesare is so schockful of the greatest Handel ever wrote other than Messiah."

    [It was early in this 2013 Metropolitan Opera Series Sunday afternoon presentation on PBS. I'll try to find the Youtube before posting again.] Thanks.

    Sorry, Patzer, for my haste in taking a short cut in reply. Please forgive.
  14. 02 Sep '13 20:23
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    "Handel's Giulio Cesare is an extraordinary opera. Were you weirded out by the male soprano singing Caesar [somewhat but its power engulfed me]

    ... and do you know why this is cast for male soprano? [Please tell me]

    As for arias, gotta be more specific since Giulio Cesare is so schockful of the greatest Handel ever wrote other than Messiah."

    [ ...[text shortened]... ain.] Thanks.

    Sorry, Patzer, for my haste in taking a short cut in reply. Please forgive.
    During the Baroque period it was operatic convention for exalted characters to be high voices. The only time I've heard Giulio Cesare live there was no male soprano available so a female was cast. Not as good because the slightly deeper pitch of the male sopranos very attractive. male sopranos never develop an adult larynx, somehow impervious to testosterone. Many Baroque era oratorios also cast male sopranos and male altos. Bach was especially fond of these and these voices make his St. Matthew and St. John Passions exceptionally attractive, with the former being a masterpiece of unparalleled beauty.