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Culture Forum

Culture Forum

  1. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    11 Jan '10 01:00 / 4 edits
    Please post media (youtube clips, etc) that clearly show an English accent that you are intimately familiar with - your accent would be a good example.

    Los Angeles Chicano accent:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o4DUi5Q_BPs

    Standard American English woman with a hint of "valley girl", Malibu, Beverly Hills to me:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmS6mkO3_TQ

    African-American Language:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klxGFAnY4nI
  2. Subscriber Crowley
    Not Aleister
    11 Jan '10 12:22
    Idiotic extremist ANC youth:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39vBhsoNdrA
  3. 11 Jan '10 18:32
    The scouse alphabet:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBYlXfjKru4

    Oooo this gives me goose bumps - music to my ears!:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o4vxN9vP3mg
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    11 Jan '10 21:30
    Originally posted by ElleEffSeee
    The scouse alphabet:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBYlXfjKru4

    Oooo this gives me goose bumps - music to my ears!:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o4vxN9vP3mg
    The Monkees had a song called "Randy Scouse Git". What does that mean? Horny "Scouse" go away?
  5. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    11 Jan '10 22:05
    Which ones is yours ATY?

    Portuguese accent in English:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPy25zW6bSw
  6. 11 Jan '10 22:07
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    The Monkees had a song called "Randy Scouse Git". What does that mean? Horny "Scouse" go away?
    First word's right, 'scouse' is the term for people from Liverpool (particularly stereotypical Liverpudlians), and 'git' is a term for an annoying person.
  7. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    12 Jan '10 01:39 / 2 edits
    None of the three accents I offered are mine. They're all Los Angeles accents though (the AAL one is more Southern, but similar to LA AAL). Mine is a mix of Standard American and Chicano I think, but it's hard to analyze oneself. A few people (bus drivers, etc) have said I seem to have a European accent but who knows where that comes from? Listening to too much Beatles?

    I sound kinda like this guy's version of Standard American.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8kVnx4Pvo4

    Is he a scouse? He's from Liverpool. Were the Beatles scouses?
  8. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    12 Jan '10 01:46 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ElleEffSeee
    First word's right, 'scouse' is the term for people from Liverpool (particularly stereotypical Liverpudlians), and 'git' is a term for an annoying person.
    "One of those stereotypically sex crazed, annoying blokes from Liverpool."

    That's what it means? What a bizaare thing to name a song.

    Or is the "singer" describing himself?
  9. Standard member rbmorris
    Vampyroteuthis
    13 Jan '10 18:29
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Please post media (youtube clips, etc) that clearly show an English accent that you are intimately familiar with - your accent would be a good example.

    Los Angeles Chicano accent:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o4DUi5Q_BPs

    Standard American English woman with a hint of "valley girl", Malibu, Beverly Hills to me:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmS6mkO3_TQ

    African-American Language:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klxGFAnY4nI
    I've always hated the way Californians pronounce their "L"s.
  10. 13 Jan '10 18:46
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    None of the three accents I offered are mine. They're all Los Angeles accents though (the AAL one is more Southern, but similar to LA AAL). Mine is a mix of Standard American and Chicano I think, but it's hard to analyze oneself. A few people (bus drivers, etc) have said I seem to have a European accent but who knows where that comes from? Listeni ...[text shortened]... e.com/watch?v=B8kVnx4Pvo4

    Is he a scouse? He's from Liverpool. Were the Beatles scouses?
    He's from Liverpool. Were the Beatles scouses?

    yes, which is why they all talk like this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPGMqHQne3M&feature=related
  11. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    14 Jan '10 01:21 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Crowley
    Idiotic extremist ANC youth:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39vBhsoNdrA
    It's amazing how different the African accent is to the Afro-American accent. I've met several Africans; my buddies and I used to hang out with this one really annoying guy from Ghana, and there's an African man living on my floor. My sister went out with an African man once too.

    Anyone familiar with the Southern accent? I bet that's where a lot of Black accent comes from.
  12. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    14 Jan '10 05:21
    There were British undercover agents in Northern Ireland who were compromised and murdered because their otherwise perfect accents were from specific Belfast housing estates that were incompatible with their cover stories. Belfast is no more than a large town by international urban standards. The diversity and specificity of accents and dialects in the U.K. is extraordinary for what is only a medium sized island.
  13. Standard member expuddlepirate
    Exaulted high possum
    14 Jan '10 07:51 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    It's amazing how different the African accent is to the Afro-American accent. I've met several Africans; my buddies and I used to hang out with this one really annoying guy from Ghana, and there's an African man living on my floor. My sister went out with an African man once too.

    Anyone familiar with the Southern accent? I bet that's where a lot of Black accent comes from.
    Southern american english has ties to celtic languages and uses a lot of dipthongs and glide vowels. While some words are drawn out others are contstricted.

    example of older more rual speech: 'At thar feller overair tain't got nairy a good hunt'n dawg woth a thang.'
    (translation: That fellow over there hasn't got a single dog of any value.)

    As far as Afro-American english, there is an influance but it stands as its own sub-dialect.
  14. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    14 Jan '10 08:23
    Originally posted by expuddlepirate
    Southern american english has ties to celtic languages and uses a lot of dipthongs and glide vowels. While some words are drawn out others are contstricted.

    example of older more rual speech: 'At thar feller overair tain't got nairy a good hunt'n dawg woth thang.'
    (translation: That fellow over there hasn't got a single dog of any value.)

    As far as Afro-American english, there is an influance but it stands as its own sub-dialect.
    The technically correct/PC term I was taught is African American Language, not dialect. But who cares? These terms fluctuate so much nobody can be expected to know them.
  15. Standard member expuddlepirate
    Exaulted high possum
    14 Jan '10 08:42
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    The technically correct/PC term I was taught is African American Language, not dialect. But who cares? These terms fluctuate so much nobody can be expected to know them.
    I have heard the term 'ebonics' but not sure off hand of its orgin.