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Culture Forum

Culture Forum

  1. 27 Mar '08 22:15 / 4 edits
    I'm curious as to what appeal Vijay Iyer's album from 2004 might have to the mainstream. Please listen to the following track and comment. Stylistically it covers quite a bit of territory so be patient.

    "...it's that elusive thing, underground political music that sounds good... a breakthrough hip-hop-jazz fusion... it's one of the smartest I've heard, and one of the few that really works." - Ben Ratliff, The New York Times

    About 1/3 of the way down click on "The Density of the 19th Century"
    http://www.vijay-iyer.com/download.shtml

    From the album's liner notes:
    This project takes its title from a pre-9/11 experience of the Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi, in spring 2001 while traveling from a festival in Hong Kong to one in Buenos Aires. Transiting through JFK, he was detained by INS officials, shackled to a bench in a crowded cell for several hours, and ultimately sent back to Hong Kong in handcuffs. Panahi's description of this ordeal was widely circulated online. He wanted to explain his story to fellow passengers: "I'm not a thief! I'm not a murderer! ... I am just an Iranian, a filmmaker. But how could I tell this, in what language?"
  2. 03 Apr '08 23:17
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    I'm curious as to what appeal Vijay Iyer's album from 2004 might have to the mainstream. Please listen to the following track and comment. Stylistically it covers quite a bit of territory so be patient.

    "...it's that elusive thing, underground political music that sounds good... a breakthrough hip-hop-jazz fusion... it's one of the smartest I've heard, ...[text shortened]... m just an Iranian, a filmmaker. But how could I tell this, in what language?"
    [/b]
    Airport officials are racists.

    Okay, that was a huge generalization on my part. Maybe they would have let him through if he was Swedish or German or Irish. Or American.
  3. 04 Apr '08 20:09
    Originally posted by scherzo
    Airport officials are racists.

    Okay, that was a huge generalization on my part. Maybe they would have let him through if he was Swedish or German or Irish. Or American.
    Unless there's more to the story you gotta believe at least one was.

    No comment on the music?
  4. 24 Apr '08 22:38
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    Unless there's more to the story you gotta believe at least one was.

    No comment on the music?
    Yes, but "at least one" does not necessarily mean "all."

    Music was sad. Sad but good. Like David Rovics.
  5. Standard member Iron Monkey
    Primal Primate
    25 Apr '08 09:39
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    This project takes its title from a pre-9/11 experience of the Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi, in spring 2001 while traveling from a festival in Hong Kong to one in Buenos Aires. Transiting through JFK, he was detained by INS officials, shackled to a bench in a crowded cell for several hours, and ultimately sent back to Hong Kong in handcuffs. Panahi's de ...[text shortened]... r! ... I am just an Iranian, a filmmaker. But how could I tell this, in what language?"[/b]
    English?
  6. 25 Apr '08 21:17
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    I'm curious as to what appeal Vijay Iyer's album from 2004 might have to the mainstream. Please listen to the following track and comment. Stylistically it covers quite a bit of territory so be patient.

    "...it's that elusive thing, underground political music that sounds good... a breakthrough hip-hop-jazz fusion... it's one of the smartest I've heard, ...[text shortened]... m just an Iranian, a filmmaker. But how could I tell this, in what language?"
    [/b]
    What do you mean "to the mainstream"? This guy's a pretty widely renouned young jazz pianist/composer, right? It's very good, but I don't think its outside the "mainstream," whatever that means.

    The project is very interesting, and the music is very good.
  7. 25 Apr '08 23:30
    Originally posted by bjohnson407
    What do you mean "to the mainstream"? This guy's a pretty widely renouned young jazz pianist/composer, right? It's very good, but I don't think its outside the "mainstream," whatever that means.

    The project is very interesting, and the music is very good.
    I guess I'm thinking that jazz has long been out of the mainstream, especially if you don't count 'smooth jazz' as jazz. Iyer has mostly worked in the 'avant-garde', so he doesn't even work within the mainstream of jazz. What I was curious was about was whether mixing in hip-hop elements was enough for it to appeal to those who aren't followers of 'avant-garde jazz'. Since you 'don't think it's outside the mainstream', is it fair to say that you think the appeal is there?
  8. 28 Apr '08 20:49 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    I guess I'm thinking that jazz has long been out of the mainstream, especially if you don't count 'smooth jazz' as jazz. Iyer has mostly worked in the 'avant-garde', so he doesn't even work within the mainstream of jazz. What I was curious was about was whether mixing in hip-hop elements was enough for it to appeal to those who aren't followers of 'avant- t's outside the mainstream', is it fair to say that you think the appeal is there?
    Smooth jazz is definitely not jazz; it's pop that thinks it has the gall to call itself jazz. I know jazz; love jazz; can live with jazz. Smooth jazz . . . all it does is make me vomit. And defecate. Then vomit again.

    Hope you aren't eating as you read this.
  9. 28 Apr '08 23:38
    Originally posted by scherzo
    Smooth jazz is definitely not jazz; it's pop that thinks it has the gall to call itself jazz. I know jazz; love jazz; can live with jazz. Smooth jazz . . . all it does is make me vomit. And defecate. Then vomit again.

    Hope you aren't eating as you read this.
    Agreed, though I don't quite have such a strong physical reaction to it I usually call it "instrumental pop".