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Culture Forum

  1. 17 Apr '12 22:04
    I started doing my graded exams in June last year. I am now on grade 7. I was trying to work out a comp bit of rhythm for one of the pieces which has a lot of jazz chords in it, so I had to look a lot up on the internet because I couldn't tell you what a 9th or 13th was until a few weeks ago.

    I was playing a lot of 7ths in the piece as stated, and my music tutor said that I shouldn't play them. I should play 9th for one of them, 13th for another and then an 11th etc. I argued 'but it says 7th???' He said well it means 9th. I carried on arguing most confused. He said it's jazz, they expect you to play these chords, 7ths are boring.

    WTF?
  2. 18 Apr '12 01:38 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Sicilian Sausage
    I started doing my graded exams in June last year. I am now on grade 7. I was trying to work out a comp bit of rhythm for one of the pieces which has a lot of jazz chords in it, so I had to look a lot up on the internet because I couldn't tell you what a 9th or 13th was until a few weeks ago.

    I was playing a lot of 7ths in the piece as stated, an confused. He said it's jazz, they expect you to play these chords, 7ths are boring.

    WTF?
    Not a musician, but I'm somewhat familiar with the basics.

    I found the following sites informative:

    "Now that the seventh chords are understood we can talk about the ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords as well as the altered dominants. As a jazz musician it is expected that you would use these chords to embellish or enhance the basic seventh chords shown in most jazz lead sheets."
    http://www.johnhallguitar.com/blog/9_11_13th_chords_and_altered_dominants_dont_play_jazz_without_em

    The following explains some theory behind extended chords and a bit about their use in jazz:
    http://doc-snow.hubpages.com/hub/Understand-Chords-Beyond-Seventh-Chords-Chord-Extensions-Part-Four-of-a-Series
  3. 22 Apr '12 10:58
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    Not a musician, but I'm somewhat familiar with the basics.

    I found the following sites informative:

    "Now that the seventh chords are understood we can talk about the ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords as well as the altered dominants. As a jazz musician it is expected that you would use these chords to embellish or enhance the basic seventh chord ...[text shortened]... bpages.com/hub/Understand-Chords-Beyond-Seventh-Chords-Chord-Extensions-Part-Four-of-a-Series
    Okay cheers. Thank you for the insight.
  4. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    22 Apr '12 17:13
    Originally posted by Sicilian Sausage
    I started doing my graded exams in June last year. I am now on grade 7. I was trying to work out a comp bit of rhythm for one of the pieces which has a lot of jazz chords in it, so I had to look a lot up on the internet because I couldn't tell you what a 9th or 13th was until a few weeks ago.

    I was playing a lot of 7ths in the piece as stated, an ...[text shortened]... confused. He said it's jazz, they expect you to play these chords, 7ths are boring.

    WTF?
    it depends on your level but it´s quite common for more advanced players to substitute "basic" things like 7ths with more "advanced" harmonies and progressions. What is funny though, every teacher will tell you different things about the subject even though all of them might be very good instrumentalists.
  5. 09 Jun '12 22:21
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    it depends on your level but it´s quite common for more advanced players to substitute "basic" things like 7ths with more "advanced" harmonies and progressions. What is funny though, every teacher will tell you different things about the subject even though all of them might be very good instrumentalists.
    How do. I can appreciate that now. it just seemed strange that at the time I was told that if a piece of music said Cm7 then a different chord could or should be played. It makes sense now but at the time I though written musc was rigid and what it said, you played.
    Cheers

    Jim
  6. Subscriber Suzianne
    Misfit Queen
    20 Jun '12 14:44
    Originally posted by Sicilian Sausage
    How do. I can appreciate that now. it just seemed strange that at the time I was told that if a piece of music said Cm7 then a different chord could or should be played. It makes sense now but at the time I though written musc was rigid and what it said, you played.
    Cheers

    Jim
    Having played a variety of different genres of music on different instruments, I'd say that for the most part this is true. What is written is what you play, for 90% of the music out there.

    Jazz, however, is different, as is Blues (kissing cousins, they are). Jazz (and, to a lesser extent, Blues) has improvisation as its foundation. Study up on what people like Miles Davis and John Coltrane brought to the music world (some of it is very arcane, especially Coltrane's best contributions), and this will become clear. I'm talking not only of their performances, but their views on the theory behind their music.