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Culture Forum

Culture Forum

  1. Subscriber Kewpie
    since 1-Feb-07
    06 Feb '12 08:30
    Any other Bayreuth pilgrims out there?
  2. Subscriber Pianoman1
    Nil desperandum
    08 Feb '12 18:25
    Yet to make the pilgrimage to Bayreuth, but never miss an opportunity to experience the Ring when it's on. Massive fan, particularly of the old school of Birgit Nilsson, Hans Hotter et al. Also passionate about Tristan and Parsifal. In my view Richard Wagner was an inspired genius of monumental stature. The genius of the Ring is that it is not placed in any time, so it is ideally suited to innovative directors to place different slants on it. Sadly, my wife does not share my passion for Wagner!
  3. Subscriber Kewpie
    since 1-Feb-07
    08 Feb '12 22:10
    Originally posted by Pianoman1
    Yet to make the pilgrimage to Bayreuth, but never miss an opportunity to experience the Ring when it's on. Massive fan, particularly of the old school of Birgit Nilsson, Hans Hotter et al. Also passionate about Tristan and Parsifal. In my view Richard Wagner was an inspired genius of monumental stature. The genius of the Ring is that it is not placed in an ...[text shortened]... directors to place different slants on it. Sadly, my wife does not share my passion for Wagner!
    I fell in love with the Ring very suddenly, at a film showing of the Chereaux Ring in 1983 to which I was reluctantly dragged by a workmate. By the end of Das Rheingold I was hooked for life. My husband, equally addicted, went with me to Bayreuth in 1985.

    The Chereaux used industrial-era England and its worker oppression (the dwarves were ironworkers) as a setting. The Bayreuth one by a different director was bland by comparison, although of course the music was just as compelling. We were lucky to get Parsifal as part of the package, along with Lohengrin and Hollander.

    There are few opportunities (about one in five years) to see a live Ring performance in Australia, so I have to make do with a DVD of the Chereaux Ring to feed my addiction.

    Make the extra effort and get yourself to Bayreuth, even if you have to spend the next five years paying for it. Whatever it costs it's worth it.
  4. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Feb '12 01:54
    Originally posted by Kewpie
    I fell in love with the Ring very suddenly, at a film showing of the Chereaux Ring in 1983 to which I was reluctantly dragged by a workmate. By the end of Das Rheingold I was hooked for life. My husband, equally addicted, went with me to Bayreuth in 1985.

    The Chereaux used industrial-era England and its worker oppression (the dwarves were ironworkers) ...[text shortened]... even if you have to spend the next five years paying for it. Whatever it costs it's worth it.
    It looks like you spend at least 1000 Euro's for all 5, or more, I gather the various prices are for prime seats V binocular seating.
  5. Subscriber Pianoman1
    Nil desperandum
    09 Feb '12 06:46
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It looks like you spend at least 1000 Euro's for all 5, or more, I gather the various prices are for prime seats V binocular seating.
    Wagner's not cheap. But then how can you equate value for money with something as extraordinary as the Ring. The experience is beyond value because it is so cathartic, enriching and addictive. Glad to communicate with other addicts! Kewpie, you are so lucky having a husband who shares your passion! The Ring was born, in my view, with Beethoven's 9th, another work, albeit on a smaller scale, of extraordinary innovation that enthused and galvanized Wagner to present to the world musicdrama of hithertoo unparraleled imaginative intellectual, emotional and spiritual depth.
  6. 10 Feb '12 09:48
    Originally posted by Pianoman1
    Wagner's not cheap. But then how can you equate value for money with something as extraordinary as the Ring. The experience is beyond value because it is so cathartic, enriching and addictive. Glad to communicate with other addicts! Kewpie, you are so lucky having a husband who shares your passion! The Ring was born, in my view, with Beethoven's 9th, anoth ...[text shortened]... musicdrama of hithertoo unparraleled imaginative intellectual, emotional and spiritual depth.
    Baldrick : I've heard what these Germans will do, Sir. They'll have
    their wicked way with anything of woman-born.

    Blackadder : Well, in that case, Baldrick, you're quite safe. However, the Teutonic reputation for brutality is well-founded: their operas last three or four days....

    (Sorry)
  7. Subscriber Kewpie
    since 1-Feb-07
    11 Feb '12 08:14 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Pianoman1
    Wagner's not cheap. But then how can you equate value for money with something as extraordinary as the Ring. The experience is beyond value because it is so cathartic, enriching and addictive. Glad to communicate with other addicts! Kewpie, you are so lucky having a husband who shares your passion! The Ring was born, in my view, with Beethoven's 9th, anoth ...[text shortened]... musicdrama of hithertoo unparraleled imaginative intellectual, emotional and spiritual depth.
    Unfortunately my husband died in 1996, and I no longer have a partner to share my passion for Richard Wagner's music. Now I live in the country far from live venues, with a new husband who has a complete tin ear. So I can listen to recordings, but the shared enjoyment has gone. What I still have are my memories.

    Appreciate the good things you have, because nothing lasts forever.