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  1. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    31 Aug '14 22:13
    http://online.wsj.com/articles/trapped-in-venezuela-airlines-abandon-fliers-amid-currency-dispute-1409162327

    CARACAS, Venezuela—When this city's professional soccer club traveled to a key match in Peru, its tough rival wasn't the only challenge. The team also had to endure an arduous four-day journey, including four connecting flights, a layover in neighboring Colombia and a jarring, cross-border bus ride.

    Like many of their compatriots, the players simply couldn't get a flight that would take them where they wanted to go.

    The 20-man team was a victim of the long-simmering dispute between international airlines and the leftist administration of President Nicolas Maduro. With the cash-strapped government holding back on releasing $3.8 billion in airline-ticket revenue because of strict currency controls, carriers have slashed service to Venezuela by half since January, adding another layer of frustration to daily life here.

    The lack of flights is complicating family vacations, business trips and the evacuation plans of Venezuelans who want to leave the country, which is whipsawed by 60% inflation, crime, food shortages and diminishing job prospects. Steve H. Hanke, a Johns Hopkins University economics professor, says Venezuela tops his so-called "misery index," which takes into account inflation, unemployment, economic stagnation and other factors in 89 countries.

    "In Venezuela, you have the sensation that you can't leave," says Virginia Hernández, a Venezuelan who is studying orthodontics in Argentina.

    -snip-

    The Caracas polling company Datanalisis found that one in 10 citizens—most of them middle- and upper-class Venezuelans between 18 and 35—are seeking to leave the country, more than double the number who sought to abandon it in 2002, which was marked by an unsuccessful coup attempt against then President Hugo Chavez and a paralyzing oil strike.

    President Maduro blames the country's problems on an "economic war" led by greedy capitalists trying to topple his government. "They're trying to wage a little war by getting rid of our overseas flights," he said during a recent televised address. "I've told these companies clearly that those who leave or try to blackmail Venezuela will not return," he warned, promising that "we'll replace them faster than you think."

    etc.


    So, is the poor Venezuelan leader the victim of a world capitalist conspiracy, or is he reaping what he's sown?

    Good luck to President Maduro in "replacing" the airline industry that he has driven away through policies that make it impossible for airlines to operate in the country on the same terms upon which their sustainability is built elsewhere.
  2. 01 Sep '14 01:25
    Originally posted by sh76
    http://online.wsj.com/articles/trapped-in-venezuela-airlines-abandon-fliers-amid-currency-dispute-1409162327

    [quote]CARACAS, Venezuela—When this city's professional soccer club traveled to a key match in Peru, its tough rival wasn't the only challenge. The team also had to endure an arduous four-day journey, including four connecting flights, a layover in ne ...[text shortened]... to operate in the country on the same terms upon which their sustainability is built elsewhere.
    The Venezuelan Tea Party is responsible for the problems.

    Damn those regressive tards!!
  3. 01 Sep '14 02:13
    Originally posted by sh76
    http://online.wsj.com/articles/trapped-in-venezuela-airlines-abandon-fliers-amid-currency-dispute-1409162327

    [quote]CARACAS, Venezuela—When this city's professional soccer club traveled to a key match in Peru, its tough rival wasn't the only challenge. The team also had to endure an arduous four-day journey, including four connecting flights, a layover in ne ...[text shortened]... to operate in the country on the same terms upon which their sustainability is built elsewhere.
    I suspect the new regime in Venezuela isn't so different from the old.
  4. 01 Sep '14 03:02
    Originally posted by normbenign
    I suspect the new regime in Venezuela isn't so different from the old.
    Did they ever mummify Chavez to ease their sense of loss?
  5. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    01 Sep '14 03:05
    Originally posted by normbenign
    I suspect the new regime in Venezuela isn't so different from the old.
    Nor does it claim to be...
  6. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    01 Sep '14 04:58
    http://www.flightradar24.com/15.05,-78.49/5
  7. 01 Sep '14 13:53
    Well, Maduro is a former bus driver. Perhaps he is just trying to help his former colleagues?
  8. 01 Sep '14 16:05
    Originally posted by sh76
    Nor does it claim to be...
    So why would we expect different results from other Communist dictatorships?
  9. 01 Sep '14 16:13
    Originally posted by normbenign
    So why would we expect different results from other Communist dictatorships?
    Venezuela's democracy may be poorly functioning, but it's not a "dictatorship." Clumsy mudslinging is really not necessary when it comes to a regime as inept as Venezuela's. Kind of reminds me of the people who criticize Obama by saying he wants to "destroy America."
  10. 01 Sep '14 16:17
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Venezuela's democracy may be poorly functioning, but it's not a "dictatorship." Clumsy mudslinging is really not necessary when it comes to a regime as inept as Venezuela's. Kind of reminds me of the people who criticize Obama by saying he wants to "destroy America."
    Just looking at the results. The new seems much like the old.
  11. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    01 Sep '14 19:20 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by normbenign
    So why would we expect different results from other Communist dictatorships?
    Though it could be argued that the Venezuelan economic troubles are a result of Chavez' policies, I don't think things never got as bad under Chavez for Venezuela as they are now.
  12. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    01 Sep '14 19:23
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    http://www.flightradar24.com/15.05,-78.49/5
    Dang. Americans fly a lot.
  13. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    01 Sep '14 20:18
    Originally posted by sh76
    Dang. Americans fly a lot.
    Well we DID invent the airplane.
  14. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    01 Sep '14 22:55
    Originally posted by sh76
    Dang. Americans fly a lot.
    http://www.flightradar24.com/21.08,-24.83/2
  15. Standard member finnegan
    GENS UNA SUMUS
    01 Sep '14 23:08
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Well we DID invent the airplane.
    Maybe not.
    In around 1808 - nearly 100 years before Orville and Wilbur Wright took to the air - he designed and built a functional piloted aeroplane. Who was he? How did he do it? And why have none of us ever heard of him?
    Cayley was born in 1773 in Scarborough and built his first aerial device in 1796: a model helicopter! In 1804 Cayley designed and built a model glider and in 1808 he published three revolutionary papers that established the science of aeronautics; he described many of the concepts and elements of the modern airplane and was the first to understand and explain in engineering terms the concepts of lift and thrust,...