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  1. 20 Dec '13 11:05
    "There are more tears shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones" (St Teresa of Avila)

    Should we be afraid of getting what we want?
  2. Subscriber Ponderable
    chemist
    20 Dec '13 15:01
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    "There are more tears shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones" (St Teresa of Avila)

    Should we be afraid of getting what we want?
    yes very much so. Normally we just don't get the big picture, not even the one about our lives.
  3. 20 Dec '13 15:11
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    "There are more tears shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones" (St Teresa of Avila)

    Should we be afraid of getting what we want?
    I can't recall the exact measure and how they baselined it, but they compared the happiness level of people who won the lottery against those who lost a limb.

    People who lost a limb were happier 6 months later than those who won the lottery.
  4. 20 Dec '13 16:52
    Originally posted by techsouth
    I can't recall the exact measure and how they baselined it, but they compared the happiness level of people who won the lottery against those who lost a limb.

    People who lost a limb were happier 6 months later than those who won the lottery.
    Wow! Good story.

    I don't play the lottery, but I have a pretty fair idea of what I do if I won it - and it would certainly involve fulfilling some specific life goals. Being content just to spend the proceeds feels like a recipe for disaster.
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    20 Dec '13 18:11
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    "There are more tears shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones" (St Teresa of Avila)

    Should we be afraid of getting what we want?
    Does this mean you met a Scandanavian with a frighteningly large herring?
  6. 20 Dec '13 18:25
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Does this mean you met a Scandanavian with a frighteningly large herring?
    Nothing so exciting, I fear!
  7. 20 Dec '13 19:20
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    "There are more tears shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones" (St Teresa of Avila)

    Should we be afraid of getting what we want?
    While you may be afraid of unforseen or unintended consequences,
    I have no fear of getting something--if it's possible--of what I want.

    I have to say that your post (I'm not making a comment on St Teresa of
    Avila) seems to come from a person who's been significantly more privileged
    than most people. When I was a child, I used to dream of finding a new
    pencil because I had to write with pencil stubs thrown away by others.
    So, even today, I feel something comforting about being able to buy a box
    of new pencils, which I doubt that a more privileged person could imagine.
  8. 20 Dec '13 19:28
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    I have to say that your post (I'm not making a comment on St Teresa of
    Avila) seems to come from a person who's been significantly more privileged
    than most people.
    Interestingly, the person who popularised St Teresa's line was Truman Capote, who certainly was more than usually privileged. His last, unfinished novel was called "Answered Prayers" and used St Teresa's line as its epigraph.
  9. 21 Dec '13 10:08
    Originally posted by techsouth
    I can't recall the exact measure and how they baselined it, but they compared the happiness level of people who won the lottery against those who lost a limb.

    People who lost a limb were happier 6 months later than those who won the lottery.
    -I- would certainly be economically rational, and benefit from winning the lottery. I virtually never gamble, though, because I'm economically rational. If other people would use the money stupidly, that's nothing to do with me, and not any reflection on -my- ability to be economically rational.
  10. 21 Dec '13 10:28
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    "There are more tears shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones" (St Teresa of Avila)

    Should we be afraid of getting what we want?
    No, I doubt it. Not for me, anyway. My goals are rational. If they're met, I'll form new rational goals based on my new circumstances.
  11. 21 Dec '13 11:14
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    "There are more tears shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones" (St Teresa of Avila)

    Should we be afraid of getting what we want?
    Which is why perhaps some of our prayers are not answered.

    However, getting what we want is another story altogether when we do things on our own.
  12. 21 Dec '13 18:34
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    "There are more tears shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones" (St Teresa of Avila)

    Should we be afraid of getting what we want?
    If someone or something answered my prayers, assuming I were to pray,
    would that mean I should reconsider my atheism?
  13. 24 Dec '13 11:17
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    If someone or something answered my prayers, assuming I were to pray,
    would that mean I should reconsider my atheism?
    I guess it depends on exactly who or what answered your prayers, and how exactly one defines the scope of what could be described as "God".
  14. 24 Dec '13 13:06
    The very notion that god answers prayers is ridiculous to me. A lot of people have died in genocide and I am sure many of them prayed only for those prayers to go unanswered.
    Many people pray for things much less significant than lives to be saved from those that do evil. Why would god answer the prayers of those wishing for trivial things and let millions die in genocide? People who think their prayers are being answered are delusional and usually egocentric.
  15. 25 Dec '13 07:36
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    The very notion that god answers prayers is ridiculous to me. A lot of people have died in genocide and I am sure many of them prayed only for those prayers to go unanswered.
    Many people pray for things much less significant than lives to be saved from those that do evil. Why would god answer the prayers of those wishing for trivial things and let mill ...[text shortened]... nocide? People who think their prayers are being answered are delusional and usually egocentric.
    Perhaps God created life, but lacks the power to prevent specific adverse events. God may have the power to do certain things (like sending Jesus as a messenger) but lack the power to fix all of humanity's problems by flipping a switch. In other words, God may only have the power to influence the flow of life intermittently, in flickers, having created life but lacking the power to fully influence or control its course. By comparison, a mother creates a child but lacks the ability to fully control the outcome of how her child develops. (This account does, of course, involve revising any account of God that is based on a presumption of omnipotence.)