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Debates Forum

  1. 09 Apr '13 02:16 / 1 edit
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2305900/Japanese-girls-anti-North-Korean-rant-goes-viral-rogue-state-threatens-nuke-West.html

    Reportedly, some people cheered on a young Japanese woman who advocated
    the massacre of ethnic Koreans in Japan. Reportedly, she said (in translation):
    "I hate the Koreans so much I can't stand it. I just want to kill them all now.
    We will start a massacre like Nanking Massacre. If the Japanese people are
    angry. we can do that." She might be a member of an extreme right-wing
    Japanese nationalist group.

    The 'Nanking Massacre' (or 'Rape of Nanking' refers to how Japanese soldiers
    behaved after capturing the Chinese city in 1937. Japanese soldiers murdered
    perhaps 300,000 Chinese civilians and raped (often many times) tens, if not
    hundreds, of thousands of Chinese women and girls. To this day, this massacre
    remains largely whitewashed in Japan. Japanese nationalists (and some Western
    sympathizers) like to deny that this massacre took place or to minimize its effects,
    sometimes claiming that Japanese soldiers killed only a few hundred or thousand
    Chinese civilians.

    Just in case some Westerners would like to assume that this latest racist rant
    against Koreans in Japan was provoked only by the DPRK's latest threats, I
    would point out that anti-Korean racism (including violence) has a long history
    in Japan. After the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923, Japanese mobs murdered
    (reportedly) thousands of Koreans and hundreds of Chinese. This reaction
    might be compared in some ways to the killing of Jews (who were scapegoats)
    in the wake of the Black Death in some parts of 14th century Europe.

    Will the authorities in the DPRK (North Korea) take this Japanese anti-Korean
    video and show it to their people to help convince them that innocent Koreans
    (about 1/4 of Koreans in Japan tend to identify more with the DPRK than with
    the ROK) could be in danger in Japan, an ally of the United States?
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    09 Apr '13 02:50 / 1 edit
    I had to read a book for an English class called A Gesture Life about a Korean man who fought in the IJA in WWII.
  3. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    09 Apr '13 03:12
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Will the authorities in the DPRK (North Korea) take this Japanese anti-Korean video and show it to their people to help convince them that innocent Koreans (about 1/4 of Koreans in Japan tend to identify more with the DPRK than with the ROK) could be in danger in Japan, an ally of the United States?
    Is this the question you want people to debate?
  4. 09 Apr '13 03:36
    Originally posted by FMF
    Is this the question you want people to debate?
    Not necessarily. I am less literal-minded, apparently, than you (FMF).
    A reader might find something of sufficient interest anywhere in the post
    or in the cited article to initiate a discussion. If a reader's not interested
    and prefers to write nothing, that's fine with me too.
  5. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    09 Apr '13 04:03
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Not necessarily. I am less literal-minded, apparently, than you (FMF).
    A reader might find something of sufficient interest anywhere in the post
    or in the cited article to initiate a discussion. If a reader's not interested
    and prefers to write nothing, that's fine with me too.
    Do you have any suggestions as to what you want to debate?
  6. 09 Apr '13 06:58
    The anti-Korean bigotry in Japan is wide and deep. I don't understand the history of it. If anybody has the right to be bitter about their mutual history it's Korea which suffered horribly under the occupation of the last century. Korea has always been caught between a rock and a hard place with China and Japan. It's a miracle that Korea has even survived as a nation and a culture.

    But in Japan, you earn political points by ripping Koreans, and to challenge that bigotry costs you political capital. Fortunately, Japan isn't a military threat to Korea anymore.

    There's a great Korean "western" available on instant Netflix entitled "The Good, the Bad, and the Weird," a tribute to spagetti westerns. It takes place in the 30s actually, in loosely occupied Manchuria. The bad guys consist of two gangs and the Japanese military. Fortunately, they're no match for the good guy on his horse with his 19th century Winchester....

    The Koreans have a bit of angst themselves. But while they are angry, they don't hate - not like some Japanese.
  7. 09 Apr '13 20:22 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Kunsoo
    The anti-Korean bigotry in Japan is wide and deep. I don't understand the history of it. If anybody has the right to be bitter about their mutual history it's Korea which suffered horribly under the occupation of the last century. Korea has always been caught between a rock and a hard place with China and Japan. It's a miracle that Korea has even survived ngst themselves. But while they are angry, they don't hate - not like some Japanese.
    For many years after the Second World War, the ROK (South Korea) banned
    the import of Japanese cultural products (e.g. music, film). To this day, some
    forms of Japanese media remain censored in the ROK. Resentment of perceived
    Japanese imperialism seems to run deep among Koreans.

    By the way, I have noticed that some Korean men and women are superb
    performers (including vocally) of Western classical music. In many ways
    the Korean people have shown that they are capable of much more than
    being among the helots of the former Japanese Empire.

    To escape Japan's brutal occupation of Korea, more than a few Koreans fled
    to China, where many of them helped the Chinese resist Japan's invasions.
    The Chinese Communist forces included a significant minority of Koreans.
    One reason why Syngman Rhee's regime (which was supported by the USA)
    was resented by many Koreans was the fact that Rhee had appointed some
    Koreans who had collaborated with the Japanese to important positions.
  8. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    09 Apr '13 20:30
    Originally posted by Kunsoo
    The anti-Korean bigotry in Japan is wide and deep. I don't understand the history of it. If anybody has the right to be bitter about their mutual history it's Korea which suffered horribly under the occupation of the last century. Korea has always been caught between a rock and a hard place with China and Japan. It's a miracle that Korea has even survived ...[text shortened]... ngst themselves. But while they are angry, they don't hate - not like some Japanese.
    The Japanese are no military threat to Korea because the USA has a boot on their neck and a choke chain in its hand.
  9. 09 Apr '13 20:58
    I find it interesting that some people believe they have the right to judge other cultures. If the Japanese want to keep their country pure, then let them. The others can leave. Pretty pathetic.

    Just know who you are dealing with. Do business with them or not accordingly, but let people live as they wish. Simple enough really, but a bit difficult for leftists. They think the entire world should bow down to their morality.
  10. 09 Apr '13 21:11 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Eladar
    I find it interesting that some people believe they have the right to judge other cultures. If the Japanese want to keep their country pure, then let them. The others can leave. Pretty pathetic.

    Just know who you are dealing with. Do business with them or not accordingly, but let people live as they wish. Simple enough really, but a bit difficult for leftists. They think the entire world should bow down to their morality.
    When I refer to bigotry against Koreans in Japan, I am *not* mostly referring
    to Korean immigrants in Japan; I am referring to people of Korean heritage
    who were born in Japan, have grown up in Japan, attended Japanese schools,
    and speak fluent Japanese, yet who often still are considered *not Japanese*.

    "I find it interesting that some people believe they have the right to judge other
    cultures. If the Japanese want to keep their country pure, let them. The others
    can leave. Pretty pathetic."
    --Eladar

    Would Eladar have felt the same way about Hitler 'want(ing) to keep (Germany)
    pure' by expelling Germany's Jews? What about Robert Mugabe (hypothetically)
    expelling all white people from Zimbabwe?

    Does Eladar's apparent approval of 'ethnic cleansing' depend upon what kind of
    people's supposed to be expelled by force?
  11. 09 Apr '13 22:48
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    When I refer to bigotry against Koreans in Japan, I am *not* mostly referring
    to Korean immigrants in Japan; I am referring to people of Korean heritage
    who were born in Japan, have grown up in Japan, attended Japanese schools,
    and speak fluent Japanese, yet who often still are considered *not Japanese*.

    "I find it interesting that some people believ ...[text shortened]... 'ethnic cleansing' depend upon what kind of
    people's supposed to be expelled by force?
    Do you see a moral equivalence between expelling undesired population, and genocide?
  12. 10 Apr '13 02:26
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    For many years after the Second World War, the ROK (South Korea) banned
    the import of Japanese cultural products (e.g. music, film). To this day, some
    forms of Japanese media remain censored in the ROK. Resentment of perceived
    Japanese imperialism seems to run deep among Koreans.

    By the way, I have noticed that some Korean men and women are superb ...[text shortened]... ee had appointed some
    Koreans who had collaborated with the Japanese to important positions.
    The South Korean film industry has produced some real gems, and I prefer their films to Japanese actually, because they deal with a much wider spectrum of emotions, and it seems to have come much further for women than the Japanese films - even a progressive like Kurosawa missed the boat in this regard.

    The Brotherhood of War, about brothers caught on opposite sides, is a epic. Ditto is about the best love story on film I've seen. You know a film industry has evolved when it can generate a self-deprecating genre satire like The Good, the Bad and the Weird, and yet generate many more esoteric films like Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring, or my personal favorite The Way Home.
  13. 10 Apr '13 02:38
    Originally posted by Kunsoo
    The South Korean film industry has produced some real gems, and I prefer their films to Japanese actually, because they deal with a much wider spectrum of emotions, and it seems to have come much further for women than the Japanese films - even a progressive like Kurosawa missed the boat in this regard.

    The Brotherhood of War, about brothers caught on oppo ...[text shortened]... esoteric films like Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring, or my personal favorite The Way Home.
    You (Kunsoo) might find it interesting to discuss films with Teinosuke,
    who teaches university classes on Japanese films.

    For whatever it's worth, a woman who's an experienced business consultant
    in East Asia told me that women face more discrimination when working for
    corporations in Japan than those in the Republic of Korea, Taiwan, or China.
    A gaijin woman tends to be treated differently, however, from a Japanese woman.
    So I would not expect to experience Japanese culture from an insider's view.
    One famous sushi chef prepares sushi differently--without asking them--for his
    gaijin guests, so they don't eat exactly what his Japanese guests would eat.
  14. 10 Apr '13 07:45
    Originally posted by Eladar
    I find it interesting that some people believe they have the right to judge other cultures. If the Japanese want to keep their country pure, then let them. The others can leave. Pretty pathetic.
    Except that its not their country to 'keep pure'. What if the 'koreans' decide they want to keep Japan pure and let the Japanese leave?
    Would you happily leave the US, if the natives decide to keep America pure? What if the African Americans decide to keep America pure? Would you leave then?
  15. 10 Apr '13 16:42
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Except that its not their country to 'keep pure'. What if the 'koreans' decide they want to keep Japan pure and let the Japanese leave?
    Would you happily leave the US, if the natives decide to keep America pure? What if the African Americans decide to keep America pure? Would you leave then?
    I'm afraid it is. It is Japan because the Japanese live there. You multi-culturalists are a pathetic lot.

    If a majority of the Japanese want to kick out small population of what they view as foreigners, I see no problem with it.

    If the native Americans had won the wars, then I'd say they have the authority and the abilities to kick others out. They lost, so they get to suffer the consequences of losing. So sad, too bad.