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  1. Subscriberno1marauder
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    11 Jul '18 18:12
    A certain poster has encouraged me to read and cite articles by professors of Asian-American Studies (I have done so in the past though this poster has ignored those instances) so I present this for the Forum's enjoyment:

    The trial of Peter Liang and confronting the reality of Asian American privilege


    On Tuesday, former New York police officer Peter Liang was sentenced to probation and community service -- but no jail time -- in the 2014 killing of Akai Gurley, an unarmed black man, in the stairwell of a Brooklyn housing project.

    This notably light sentence is a relief to some Asian Americans -- particularly Chinese Americans -- who leaped to Liang's defense from the start, arguing that the shooting was a tragic accident and that Liang's prosecution and conviction were proof of selective prosecution and racial scapegoating.

    But many progressive Asian Americans -- who called for Liang's conviction and rallied Asian Americans to stand in solidarity with black people against police violence -- are bitterly disappointed with Liang's sentence.

    This divide over the Liang trial reflects a much deeper political division within Asian American communities about whether to pursue an "Asian-first" strategy or a broader racial justice agenda. At the heart of that debate is a crucial topic that often gets swept under the rug, one the Liang trial will hopefully bring to the fore: the beneficial positioning of Asian Americans in the country's racial order.

    Asian Americans are not, as they are often labeled, a "model minority" whose cultural endowments have allowed them to outstrip other less equipped minorities. However, like whites, they do enjoy a priceless set of structural privileges and immunities, as evidenced by high educational and residential integration and intermarriage rates with whites. They have also been immunized, relatively speaking, from the systemic, routine and often lethal violence exercised by the state against the black community -- not just episodes of individual killing, but the institutionalized violence of residential segregation, educational segregation, job discrimination, policing and mass incarceration.

    This advanced positioning of Asian Americans relative to black people in the U.S. racial order can be traced all the way back to the mid-19th century. Chinese arriving in San Francisco were residentially segregated, subject to mob violence, harassed through municipal laws and widely scorned as inferior to and unassimilable with whites. Still, they were universally seen -- on the authority of the ethnological science, racial common sense and international norms of the day -- as a different, superior order of being as compared with black people. They were aliens ineligible for citizenship, but they were also ineligible for enslavement.

    Peter Liang's supporters have zoomed in on the narrow question of whether he was treated more harshly than his white counterparts, while blocking out the larger picture of the privileges and immunities Asian Americans enjoy.

    The notion that Asian Americans are pawns or sacrificial lambs in the war between whites and blacks is a recurrent fantasy among many Asian Americans. A scapegoat, however, is by definition a moral innocent, one made to bear the blame for others. By what authoritative procedure have Asian Americans absolved themselves of moral responsibility for the hierarchical racial order in which they are embedded?

    That Asian Americans experience discrimination does not secure their innocence. Nor does the fact that their privileges and immunities are not as complete or robust as those of whites.

    This is a pivotal moment in the political history of Asian America. Currently, some Asian American groups are forging alliances with conservative white politicians to defeat state affirmative action bills and spearhead anti-affirmative action lawsuits against elite universities. Others have moved in the opposite direction, denouncing these "Asian-first" moves and calling for Asian-black solidarity in the fight against white supremacy. The Achilles heel of the latter position it that it assumes the unity of nonwhite interests, even though Asian Americans are positioned differently from black people in the U.S. racial order.

    The Liang case challenges Asian Americans to develop a political ethos that calls for confronting racial hierarchy and anti-black racism, even when the self-interest of Asian Americans dictates otherwise.

    Claire Jean Kim is a professor of Asian American studies and political science at UC Irvine. She is the author of the award-winning book "Bitter Fruit: The Politics of Black-Korean Conflict in New York City."

    http://www.latimes.com/opinion/opinion-la/la-ol-peter-liang-asian-american-privilege-20160421-snap-story.html

    As always, I take no position on the Liang case itself though probation for manslaughter is an unusually light sentence (though perhaps justified by the facts of the case).

    I am more interested in the frank assessment of this Professor that Asian-Americans are a "privileged" minority in the US' "racial hierarchy". Who agrees or disagrees?
  2. Subscriberno1marauder
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    11 Jul '18 18:25
    Here's an interesting related article puncturing several myths about Asian-American economic achievement:

    “The widespread assumption is that Asian Americans came to the United States very disadvantaged, and they wound up advantaged through extraordinary investments in their children’s education,” says Brown University economist Nathaniel Hilger.

    But that's not what really happened, he says.

    Hilger recently used old census records to trace the fortunes of whites, blacks and Asians who were born in California during the early- to mid-20th century. He found that educational gains had little to do with how Asian Americans managed to close the wage gap with whites by the 1970s.

    Instead, his research suggests that society simply became less racist toward Asians.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In 1965, changing laws ushered in a surge of high-skilled, high-earning Asian workers, who now account for most of the Asians living in the United States today.

    But even before the arrival of those highly educated immigrants, the Asians already living in the United States had more or less closed the wage gap with whites.

    At the time of the 1940 census, Hilger found, California-born Asian men earned less than California-born black men. By the 1970 census, they were earning about the same as white men, and by the 1980 census, the native-born Asian men were out-earning white men.

    Throughout this time, many Asian American families did invest, increasingly, in their children's education. But Hilger discovered that the improvements in educational attainment were too modest to explain how Asians' earnings grew so fast.

    The picture became much clearer when he compared people with similar levels of education. Hilger found that in the 1940s, Asian men were paid less than white men with the same amount of schooling. But by the 1980s, that gap had mostly disappeared.

    “Asians used to be paid like blacks,” Hilger said. “But between 1940 and 1970, they started to get paid like whites.” The charts below shows average earnings for native-born black, white and Asian depending on how much education they had.

    In 1980, for instance, even Asian high school dropouts were earning about as much as white high school dropouts, and vastly more than black high school dropouts. This dramatic shift had nothing to do with Asians accruing more education. Instead, Hilger points to the slow dismantling of discriminatory institutions after World War II, and the softening of racist prejudices. That’s the same the explanation advanced by economists Harriet Orcutt Duleep and Seth Sanders, who found that in the second half of the 20th century, Asian Americans not only started to work in more lucrative industries, but also started to get paid more for the same kind of work.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    sian Americans — some of them at least — have made tremendous progress in the United States. But the greatest thing that ever happened to them wasn't that they studied hard, or that they benefited from tiger moms or Confucian values. It's that other Americans started treating them with a little more respect.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/11/19/the-real-secret-to-asian-american-success-was-not-education/?utm_term=.dac74eae4af0

    An alternative, less nice way to put it, would be to say that racial stereotypes changed; Asians were now seen as "smarter", more hard working and more compliant thus making them less threatening to the white majority than blacks and other minorities. So they got treated better.
  3. Subscriberno1marauder
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    11 Jul '18 18:51
    Another interesting take:

    Q: You found that Asian Americans are more successful in pursuing an education because of factors that do not relate to values in Asian cultures. How do you hope this book will help to dispel that belief?

    A: There is a popular misconception that Asian Americans attain high levels of education and achieve success because they hold the “right” cultural traits and values, but this argument is as misguided as attributing poverty among the poor to their “wrong” traits and values. This line of reasoning also fails to acknowledge important structural and institutional factors and, in the case of Asian Americans, fails to acknowledge the pivotal role of U.S. immigration law. The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 gave preferences to highly-educated, highly-skilled applicants from Asia, which, in turn, ushered in a new stream of Asian immigrants of diverse skills and socioeconomic backgrounds. Some Asian immigrant groups are hyper-selected, meaning they are doubly positively selected; they are not only more highly educated than their compatriots from their countries of origin who did not immigrate, but also more highly educated than the U.S. average…

    Hyper-selectivity has consequences for immigrant and second-generation mobility. First, the children (the 1.5 and second generation) of the hyper-selected groups begin their lives from more advantaged “starting points” than the children of other immigrant groups, like Mexicans, or native-born minorities. Second, because Chinese and other Asian immigrants are disproportionately highly educated, the host society perceives that all Asian Americans are highly educated and high achieving, and then attributes their success to their culture, values, and grit. But this is fallacious reasoning; it is akin to making generalizations about Americans based on only those who graduate from prestigious universities...


    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In our research, we learned about the hidden ways in which Asian Americans benefit from racial stereotypes in schools. Asian American students are positively stereotyped by teachers, guidance counselors, school administrators, and their peers as smart, high-achieving, and hard-working. As a result, they are more likely to be placed in competitive academic tracks, and are also more likely to be offered help with their college applications. These opportunities were not accorded to the Mexican, white, or black students in our study.

    The positive racial stereotypes and biases can result stereotype promise—the promise of being viewed through the lens of a positive stereotype, which can enhance one’s performance. The students we profiled in our book were average in junior high school, but were placed into the honors track in high school, nevertheless...Both students graduated with grade point averages that exceeded 4.0, and were admitted into prestigious universities. We found that stereotype promise is the social psychological process by which high academic achievement among previously low-achieving Asian American students becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.

    https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/08/04/authors-discuss-reasoning-behind-high-levels-asian-american-achievement
  4. Zugzwang
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    11 Jul '18 19:142 edits
    The racist troll No1Marauder has a long record of apparently approving of or condoning
    anti-Asian racism, including a white judge's sentencing two white men to no time in prison,
    three years' probation, and token fines for the brutal killing of an Asian American man.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Vincent_Chin

    I doubt that No1Marauder could find any Asian American civil rights lawyer (including
    the federal judge Denny Chin) familiar with the case who believes that the judge's lenient
    sentence (No1Marauder seems to deny that it was lenient) was influenced by racism.
    It was a popular sentence among racist whites at that time, and it still could be so today.
    (Even Tom Wolsey criticized, sincerely or not, the lenient sentencing of Vincent Chin's killers.)

    Now the extremely arrogant racist white American No1Marauder (who knows nothing
    about diverse Asian American communities beyond the stereotypes of the mainstream
    US media) cherry picks one incident, while preferring to distort the diversity of Asian American
    views about it. In fact, Asian Americans (a catch-all term for communities lumped together
    for the convenience of others) are NOT monolithic, and have very different views of this case.

    Here's another side (which No1Marauder would prefer to ignore) of this story:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2016/03/peter-liang-police-shooting/471687/

    "Why Was Officer Peter Liang Convicted?
    Was it racism, the facts of the case, or fraying trust in police?"
    --J. Weston Phippen (not a common Asian American name)

    "IT TAKES A LOT TO INDICT AND CONVICT AN OFFICER IN NEW YORK.
    The last time it happened was in 2005 ... Convictions of officers are usually restricted
    to extreme circumstances like this, which makes Liang’s case all the more surprising.

    “Ten years ago, he wouldn’t have been prosecuted,” said Stephen Saltzburg, a
    professor at George Washington University Law School, and former U.S. Department
    of Justice deputy assistant attorney. “And if he was, they would have acquitted him.”

    “As a former prosecutor and an academic who has been writing about police killings
    since the late ’90s, I see this case as the one least likely to result in conviction under
    normal circumstances,” Delores Jones-Brown, a professor at the John Jay College of
    Criminal Justice, wrote me in an email.

    A week after the conviction, thousands of protesters said they knew why jurors found
    Liang guilty: He’s Asian. LIANG WAS A MINORITY SCAPEGOAT, THEY SAID, SACRIFICED
    TO A NATION INCENSED BY [MOSTLY WHITE] OFFICERS KILLING BLACK MEN.
    Take the case of Eric Garner, the protesters argued. In that case, a white officer jumped
    on Garner’s back and choked him as Garner yelled 11 times those now famous words,
    “I can’t breathe!” Garner had done little more than argue with officers, and a chokehold
    was outlawed by police guidelines. A camera recorded everything, but even then the
    officer never faced a jury. That contrast raised a question—was Liang’s conviction
    evidence of increased accountability, of racial bias, or of both?"

    "Before Liang killed Gurley, about six months after Garner died in 2014, the New York
    Daily News reported that in 15 years, and in at least 179 NYPD officer-involved deaths,
    only three officers had ever been indicted. So Liang’s case going to trial in itself was a milestone.
    The contrast between the two cases––Garner and Liang’s––was taken by Asian protesters
    in New York as evidence of racial bias. In Garner’s death, Officer Daniel Pantaleo made
    an active decision to escalate the confrontation and choke Garner on the Staten Island
    sidewalk. Neither Pantaleo, nor other officers, nor four emergency medical responders
    tried to save Garner––just as Liang and his partner never helped Gurley. “The fact that
    the prosecutor in Staten Island couldn't even secure an indictment when a white police
    officer violates his own patrol guide ... but an Asian officer can be indicted and convicted
    for what appears to be completely unintentional behavior, rubs raw the existing frictions
    of race relations,” Delores Jones-Brown wrote me."

    "Gordon Zhang shares that frustration. He’s a member of the Long Island Chinese American
    Association, and he protested against Liang’s conviction. Liang made the perfect scapegoat,
    Zhang said, because the Chinese-American community in New York is often silent.
    They don’t march. They don’t make waves."

    "The writer Jay Caspian Kang raised similar concerns in a New York Times article after
    the protests, writing that, "THERE ARE MANY WITHIN THE ASIAN-AMERICAN COMMUNITY,
    for example, WHO BELIEVE THAT LIANG DESERVED TO BE CONVICTED OF MANSLAUGHTER,
    BUT ALSO WONDER WHY IT WAS THE ASIAN COP, AMONG MANY OTHER EQUALLY
    DESERVING [WHITE] OFFICERS, WHO TOOK THE FALL.""

    "It may seem unfair. After the killings of so many black men by white officers,
    why should the first major conviction be Asian?"

    Note that Delores Jones-Brown, a professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice,
    evidently strongly disputes No1Marauder's biased interpretation of this case.

    "Liang had graduated from the police academy the year before the shooting."

    Evidently, not many Asian Americans believe that Peter Liang should have been able to
    avoid prosecution or punishment for his actions, for which he, though a rookie, was responsible.
    But many Asian Americans are understandably concerned by why Peter Liang seems to
    have been singled out when many other white policemen who committed similar or worse
    actions were not prosecuted. In addition, Asian Americans may be disturbed by the NYPD's
    alleged comparative lack of support for Peter Liang in contrast to its support of white policemen.

    My general point is that if there were ten Asian Americans (or even Chinese Americans,
    to name a diverse community who feel closer to Peter Liang) in a room, there probably
    would be several different opinions about this case. And if there were ten Asian Americans
    who had read enough of No1Marauder's anti-Asian racist posts on other issues, then
    I expect that there would be about no disagreement that No1Marauder's a racist.

    No1Marauder's a vile racist, who can hardly conceal his bigotry and hate toward many,
    if not all, Asian Americans. I await No1Marauder's 'explanation' of how mathematics tests
    (primarily designed by whites) allegedly unfairly discriminate against blacks and in favor or Asians.
    And No1Marauder should compare blacks and Asians at the same economic levels.
  5. Subscriberno1marauder
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    11 Jul '18 19:251 edit
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    The racist troll No1Marauder has a long record of apparently approving of or condoning
    anti-Asian racism, including a white judge's sentencing two white men to no time in prison,
    three years' probation, and token fines for the brutal killing of an Asian American man.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Vincent_Chin

    I doubt that No1Marauder cou ...[text shortened]... favor or Asians.
    And No1Marauder should compare blacks and Asians at the same economic levels.
    From the the two Sociology Professors:

    In our research, we learned about the hidden ways in which Asian Americans benefit from racial stereotypes in schools. Asian American students are positively stereotyped by teachers, guidance counselors, school administrators, and their peers as smart, high-achieving, and hard-working. As a result, they are more likely to be placed in competitive academic tracks, and are also more likely to be offered help with their college applications. These opportunities were not accorded to the Mexican, white, or black students in our study.

    The positive racial stereotypes and biases can result stereotype promise—the promise of being viewed through the lens of a positive stereotype, which can enhance one’s performance. The students we profiled in our book were average in junior high school, but were placed into the honors track in high school, nevertheless...Both students graduated with grade point averages that exceeded 4.0, and were admitted into prestigious universities. We found that stereotype promise is the social psychological process by which high academic achievement among previously low-achieving Asian American students becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.


    They must be "vile racists". Certainly their academic credentials look suspect:

    Authors Jennifer Lee, a professor of sociology at the University of California at Irvine, and Min Zhou, a professor of sociology at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore and the University of California at Los Angeles,
  6. Subscriberno1marauder
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    11 Jul '18 19:26
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    The racist troll No1Marauder has a long record of apparently approving of or condoning
    anti-Asian racism, including a white judge's sentencing two white men to no time in prison,
    three years' probation, and token fines for the brutal killing of an Asian American man.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Vincent_Chin

    I doubt that No1Marauder cou ...[text shortened]... favor or Asians.
    And No1Marauder should compare blacks and Asians at the same economic levels.
    Perhaps you missed this:

    no1: As always, I take no position on the Liang case itself though probation for manslaughter is an unusually light sentence (though perhaps justified by the facts of the case).
  7. Zugzwang
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    11 Jul '18 19:494 edits
    Originally posted by @no1marauder
    From the the two Sociology Professors:

    In our research, we learned about the hidden ways in which Asian Americans benefit from racial stereotypes in schools. Asian American students are positively stereotyped by teachers, guidance counselors, school administrators, and their peers as smart, high-achieving, and hard-working. As a result, they are more g Asian American students becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.

    They must be "vile racists".
    My various reasons for concluding (it took me many months before I did so) that
    No1Marauder's a vile racist are NOT the 'strawmen' that he loves to prop up.

    As always, the racist troll No1Marauder evades this simple question:
    I await No1Marauder's 'explanation' of how *mathematics tests* (primarily designed by whites)
    allegedly unfairly discriminate against blacks and in favor or Asians.
    And No1Marauder should compare blacks and Asians at the same economic levels.

    No1Marauder prefers to conflate objective measuring (as in mathematics) and subjective
    assessments of academic performance. I concur that some positive stereotypes (which
    tend to have some basis in fact rather than being wild random prejudices) of Asian American
    students exist, and these stereotypes may help them in subjective assessments.
    (Likewise, Jeremy Lin was stereotyped as slow and lacking athleticism even when the stopwatch
    showed that he could run as fast as some black basketball players praised as athletic.)
    But that's very different from the OBJECTIVE measuring of performance as in mathematics tests.
    Does No1Marauder claim that mathematics tests are racist?

    Can No1Marauder cite any evidence that black students who have equal scores with
    Asian students in mathematics tests are treated worse than Asian students?

    On the contrary, there's an affirmative action program called MESA (Minority Science and Engineering Achievement).
    A Hispanic friend of mine benefited from MESA, though he said that he did not need it.
    He was born in the USA to a Mexican father and a white mother. He's a native speaker of English.
    His family was middle-class to upper-middle-class. (They drove a Mercedes-Benz car.)
    In high school, for maintaining at least a B average in college prep mathematics and
    science classes, my friend was rewarded (regardless of family income) with hundreds
    of USD direct from the MESA program. All black, Latino, and American 'Indians' were
    eligible for MESA, which also offered (at least in some places) special tutoring for them.
    He said that he personally had experienced no discrimination for being Hispanic in school.
    My friend said that he felt rather guilty about the MESA money because his education
    had never suffered from want of money (his parents bought an Encyclopedia Britannica
    set for him). And he knew of classmates from poor non-English-speaking Asian immigrant
    families who were earning higher grades than his and received no aid from MESA.
    So he decided to donate part of his MESA money to charity. He went on to earn a
    graduate degree in science and enjoy a middle-class to upper-middle-class lifestyle.
    My Hispanic friend believes that MESA was an affirmative action program that he did
    not need and was not justified upon objective grounds of need or past discrimination.

    By the way, his (dark-skinned) Mexican American father experienced some prejudice in the USA.
    While voting for the Democratic Party, he believed, however, that he did not need affirmative action
    in order to join the middle-class (or to marry a white woman and be accepted in a mostly white neighborhood).

    So would No1Marauder like to tell my friend that he was oppressed by racism, even if
    he did not know it, and therefore was more deserving of MESA money than a much
    poorer Asian or white classmate with higher grades in mathematics and science?
  8. Zugzwang
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    11 Jul '18 19:571 edit
    Originally posted by @no1marauder
    Perhaps you missed this:

    no1: As always, I take no position on the Liang case itself though probation for manslaughter is an unusually light sentence (though perhaps justified by the facts of the case).
    The racist No1Marauder created this thread in order to troll me in particular, given that
    it's well-known that I am the only person here who writes about Asian American issues.

    My criticism of No1Marauder is primarily about his continuing misrepresentation of
    diverse Asian American communities (from whom he loves to cherry pick opinions):

    Now the extremely arrogant racist white American No1Marauder (who knows nothing
    about diverse Asian American communities beyond the stereotypes of the mainstream
    US media) cherry picks one incident, while preferring to distort the diversity of Asian American
    views about it. In fact, Asian Americans (a catch-all term for communities lumped together
    for the convenience of others) are NOT monolithic, and have very different views of this case.

    It's easy for the racist troll No1Marauder to appeal here to popular anti-Asian racism
    or the even much more popular denial of anti-Asian racism.
  9. Behind the scenes
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    11 Jul '18 20:013 edits
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    The racist troll No1Marauder has a long record of apparently approving of or condoning
    anti-Asian racism, including a white judge's sentencing two white men to no time in prison,
    three years' probation, and token fines for the brutal killing of an Asian American man.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Vincent_Chin

    I doubt that No1Marauder cou ...[text shortened]... favor or Asians.
    And No1Marauder should compare blacks and Asians at the same economic levels.
    I await No1Marauder's 'explanation' of how mathematics tests (primarily designed by whites)....


    This would suggest if a mathematics test were designed by asians instead of whites 2+2 = something other than 4.

    No1Marauder - You cannot have an objective discussion with a hostile, closed minded racist. I've tried. 🙂
  10. Subscriberno1marauder
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    11 Jul '18 20:04
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    My various reasons for concluding (it took me many months before I did so) that
    No1Marauder's a vile racist are NOT the 'strawmen' that he loves to prop up.

    As always, the racist troll No1Marauder evades this simple question:
    I await No1Marauder's 'explanation' of how *mathematics tests* (primarily designed by whites)
    allegedly unfairly discriminat ...[text shortened]... ney than a much
    poorer Asian or white classmate with higher grades in mathematics and science?
    Again your argument by anecdote is irrational and fallacious.

    The quote from the article by the two Sociology Professors addresses your point but you have not meaningfully responded to it preferring (as always) to just scream insults and personal attacks. I'm not surprised you have no answer to their observations but your adherence to "scientific racism" is no more convincing than Philo's or CSA Vice-President Stephens'.
  11. Zugzwang
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    11 Jul '18 20:04
    Originally posted by @mchill
    I await No1Marauder's 'explanation' of how mathematics tests (primarily designed by whites)....


    This would suggest if a mathematics test were designed by asians instead of whites 2+2 = something other than 5.

    No1Marauder - You cannot have an objective discussion with a closed minded racist. I've tried. 🙂
    "I await No1Marauder's 'explanation' of how mathematics tests (primarily designed by
    whites) allegedly unfairly discriminate against blacks and in favor or Asians.
    And No1Marauder should compare blacks and Asians at the same economic levels."
    --Duchess64

    Obviously, the lying racist troll Mchill extremely dishonestly distorts what I wrote in
    continuing his tireless campaign of racist trolling.
  12. Subscriberno1marauder
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    11 Jul '18 20:051 edit
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    The racist No1Marauder created this thread in order to troll me in particular, given that
    it's well-known that I am the only person here who writes about Asian American issues.

    My criticism of No1Marauder is primarily about his continuing misrepresentation of
    diverse Asian American communities (from whom he loves to cherry pick opinions):

    Now the ...[text shortened]... l here to popular anti-Asian racism
    or the even much more popular denial of anti-Asian racism.
    Maybe I thought you'd want to have a reasoned discussion based on your assessment of scholarly articles by Asian-American academics and reporters.



    Just kidding; I knew you'd be an a**hole.
  13. Zugzwang
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    11 Jul '18 20:101 edit
    Originally posted by @no1marauder
    Again your argument by anecdote is irrational and fallacious.

    The quote from the article by the two Sociology Professors addresses your point but you have not meaningfully responded to it preferring (as always) to just scream insults and personal attacks. I'm not surprised you have no answer to their observations but your adherence to "scientific racism" is no more convincing than Philo's or CSA Vice-President Stephens'.
    The racist troll No1Marauder keeps dishonestly distorting or lying about the context.

    As always, the racist troll No1Marauder evades this simple question:
    I await No1Marauder's 'explanation' of how *mathematics tests* (primarily designed by whites)
    allegedly unfairly discriminate against blacks and in favor or Asians.
    And No1Marauder should compare blacks and Asians at the same economic levels.

    I did NOT notice anything explicitly in what No1Marauder quoted about MATHEMATICS TESTS.
    In particular, about why, at the same economic levels, (diverse) Asian students score
    much higher on average than black students. I await No1Marauder's 'explanation' of
    how these mathematics tests are racist or how some teachers' supposed stereotyping
    allegedly helps Asian students perform better on objective mathematics tests.

    By the way, a white American woman (whom I knew slightly) attended Oxford University.
    She tried out for rowing. Being an American, she was stereotyped as very athletic, and
    the British immediately selected her to row with their best. But that stereotyping did not
    help her (as she readily conceded) improve her mediocre (at best) performance.
  14. Subscriberno1marauder
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    11 Jul '18 20:11
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    "I await No1Marauder's 'explanation' of how mathematics tests (primarily designed by
    whites) allegedly unfairly discriminate against blacks and in favor or Asians.
    And No1Marauder should compare blacks and Asians at the same economic levels."
    --Duchess64

    Obviously, the lying racist troll Mchill extremely dishonestly distorts what I wrote in
    continuing his tireless campaign of racist trolling.
    Do you agree with Professor Kim that there is an "Asian-American Privilege" which consists of a "beneficial positioning of Asian Americans in the country's racial order" who "enjoy a priceless set of structural privileges and immunities"?

    If not, where is this Professor of Asian-American Studies' error(s)?
  15. Subscriberno1marauder
    Humble and Kind
    In the Gazette
    Joined
    22 Jun '04
    Moves
    39965
    11 Jul '18 20:121 edit
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    The racist troll No1Marauder keeps dishonestly distorting or lying about the context.

    As always, the racist troll No1Marauder evades this simple question:
    I await No1Marauder's 'explanation' of how *mathematics tests* (primarily designed by whites)
    allegedly unfairly discriminate against blacks and in favor or Asians.
    And No1Marauder should compare ...[text shortened]... osed stereotyping
    allegedly helps Asian students perform better on objective mathematics tests.
    Why would Mathematics tests be immune from the factors mentioned by the Sociology Professors? For example:

    The positive racial stereotypes and biases can result stereotype promise—the promise of being viewed through the lens of a positive stereotype, which can enhance one’s performance.
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