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  1. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    23 Nov '15 18:57
    1,200 People Die Over Sneakers Each Year

    I believe I remember the killing for shoes started after basketball great Michael Jordon signed a deal with Nike to advertize their sneakers they named Air Jordan. This began the $100 dollar sneakers that began replacing the $20 basketball shoes of that time. Many of the Black teenagers had to have the shoes of their sports idol at all cost. Yeah, here is a link:

    YOUR SNEAKERS OR YOUR LIFE

    http://www.chucksconnection.com/articles/your-sneakers-or-your-life.html

    YouTube
  2. 23 Nov '15 19:12
    When Jordans first hit the market, I admit I had to try them. They are really crappy shoes. Don't fit well, and wear out faster than other brands at less than half the price. Fact is, that's generally true of most NIKE athletic shoes, from football, to race walking.
  3. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    23 Nov '15 19:17 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by normbenign
    When Jordans first hit the market, I admit I had to try them. They are really crappy shoes. Don't fit well, and wear out faster than other brands at less than half the price. Fact is, that's generally true of most NIKE athletic shoes, from football, to race walking.
    They have $200 Nike shoes now. Maybe they are better.

    Boy Shot & Killed For His $200 Nike Zoom Rookie Sneakers!

    YouTube
  4. 23 Nov '15 19:22 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    They have $200 Nike shoes now. Maybe they are better.
    I doubt it. I recently purchased a really comfortable pair of walking shoes branded Sketchers, which cost less than $30.

    Nike quality really went downhill when the company moved manufacturing to Indonesia from their New Hampshire and Oregon facilities.
  5. Subscriber Sleepyguy
    Reepy Rastardly Guy
    23 Nov '15 19:26
    Originally posted by normbenign
    When Jordans first hit the market, I admit I had to try them. They are really crappy shoes. Don't fit well, and wear out faster than other brands at less than half the price. Fact is, that's generally true of most NIKE athletic shoes, from football, to race walking.
    I once held a second job on a graveyard shift where I and about twenty others would inflate those Air Jordan soles with Freon one after another for hours on end. Maybe you wore some soles I inflated.
  6. 23 Nov '15 19:33
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    I once held a second job on a graveyard shift where I and about twenty others would inflate those Air Jordan soles with Freon one after another for hours on end. Maybe you wore some soles I inflated.
    Don't know. Aren't most of them pumped up with a bubble on the shoe?

    In my later years, my sport was race walking and masters middle distance running. I always found Asics and Addidas to be better fitting and better lasting, as well as performance oriented compared to NIKE. Even a few lesser known brands such as Etonics were regularly better than NIKE.
  7. Subscriber Sleepyguy
    Reepy Rastardly Guy
    23 Nov '15 19:52
    Originally posted by normbenign
    Don't know. Aren't most of them pumped up with a bubble on the shoe?

    In my later years, my sport was race walking and masters middle distance running. I always found Asics and Addidas to be better fitting and better lasting, as well as performance oriented compared to NIKE. Even a few lesser known brands such as Etonics were regularly better than NIKE.
    When I had that job the soles came to me as two flat pieces that were heat sealed at the edges, with a small inlet on one edge. We would create a hole in the inlet by inserting a needle, fill the sole with Freon from the needle (which was attached by a hose to a Freon tank), place a clamp on the inlet to prevent Freon escaping, remove the needle, heat seal the inlet with this strange press machine they had before removing the clamp. Repeat repeat repeat. I would do that all night, go home and crash for a few hours, then get up and go to my day job.
  8. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    23 Nov '15 23:07 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    When I had that job the soles came to me as two flat pieces that were heat sealed at the edges, with a small inlet on one edge. We would create a hole in the inlet by inserting a needle, fill the sole with Freon from the needle (which was attached by a hose to a Freon tank), place a clamp on the inlet to prevent Freon escaping, remove the needle, heat seal ...[text shortened]... I would do that all night, go home and crash for a few hours, then get up and go to my day job.
    Did you know that a federal law was passed that made it illegal to release freon into the air because it depleted the ozone layer causing a hole in the atmosphere that many believed also caused global warming?
  9. Subscriber kmax87
    You've got Kevin
    23 Nov '15 23:51
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Did you know that a federal law was passed that made it illegal to release freon into the air because it depleted the ozone layer causing a hole in the atmosphere that many believed also caused global warming?
    Where would we be without big government!?
  10. 24 Nov '15 03:42
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    When I had that job the soles came to me as two flat pieces that were heat sealed at the edges, with a small inlet on one edge. We would create a hole in the inlet by inserting a needle, fill the sole with Freon from the needle (which was attached by a hose to a Freon tank), place a clamp on the inlet to prevent Freon escaping, remove the needle, heat seal ...[text shortened]... I would do that all night, go home and crash for a few hours, then get up and go to my day job.
    I didn't think about it at first, but you are an Oregon resident, so if you were working on NIke Air shoes, it was before most of the manufacturing of their high priced shoes went overseas.

    When I bought one pair it was on the notion of being able to adjust the fit and support, which was done with a bubble on the tongue of the shoe. I guess some did have pre installed air soles, but since those days I've never again bought a pair of Nike athletic shoes, and always recommended other brands to those I coached. Few world class athletes wear NIKE shoes without financial compensation.
  11. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    24 Nov '15 11:03
    Originally posted by normbenign
    I didn't think about it at first, but you are an Oregon resident, so if you were working on NIke Air shoes, it was before most of the manufacturing of their high priced shoes went overseas.

    When I bought one pair it was on the notion of being able to adjust the fit and support, which was done with a bubble on the tongue of the shoe. I guess some did h ...[text shortened]... ds to those I coached. Few world class athletes wear NIKE shoes without financial compensation.
    Don't forget Black Feet Matter.
  12. 24 Nov '15 14:30
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Don't forget Black Feet Matter.
  13. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    24 Nov '15 14:35
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Did you know that a federal law was passed that made it illegal to release freon into the air because it depleted the ozone layer causing a hole in the atmosphere that many believed also caused global warming?
    It DID deplete the ozone layer. That was clear. That law was passed around 1988 or so.

    If he did the freon inflate thing in 1985 it would have been legal.

    It actually effected my job in particular.

    I worked for a scientific outfit called Varian ATT. We used freon to cool the machines I worked on, Ion Implanters. Google them if you want to know more, it would take many words to describe.

    Anyway, freon is an excellent coolant liquid, very clean and if it leaks out, it evaporates quickly leaving no residue behind so the cleanup is nothing.

    Varian and everyone else using freon as a coolant had to come up with something else to cool with.

    One company I worked with later on, around 1990, Commodore Computers in Horsham Pa, decided to cool their ion implanter with mineral oil.

    Mineral oil doesn't cool nearly as efficiently as freon AND it is flammable.

    The ion implanter has several levels of power supplies, some at 5 volts and hundreds of amps, 20,000 volts at much lower amperage, and 200,000 volts at even lower currents. The thing is, all those supplies can short out and create sparks that could theoretically catch the machine on fire.

    Freon is almost impossible to burn so in that respect it was a much better cooling liquid.

    I PROVED mineral oil was flammable and got royally chewed out for that demo

    They also did not change the cooling liquid.

    One day I came in to work and found a nice fountain of mineral oil shooting right into the cleanroom. A frigging royal mess to clean up.

    I did enjoy that 'told you so' moment but they still kept up with the mineral oil coolant.

    Another tact was to use DI water. De-inoized water that is composed of mainly water molecules and nothing else.

    That is the purest water you can ever make, 100% water molecules.

    The problem with DI water is, although it is a great coolant liquid, Water is a polar molecule, a plus charge at one end and a minus charge at the other. With ordinary tap water this is not a problem because the contaminants in the water clump up the water molecules to create a non corrosive liquid, mostly anyway.

    DI water is ultra pure water and as such, is 100% polar molecule. That makes it very corrosive to almost all metals. It chews up metal connectors and causes a lot of leaks.

    That caused a problem for one machine at the University of Cincinnati I was assigned to rebuild, a gift from Texas Instruments.

    I had to change all the stainless steel fittings to teflon, dozens of them, in order to run DI water as a coolant.

    So I am very familiar with the changeover from Freon to DI water as a coolant!
  14. 24 Nov '15 18:00 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It DID deplete the ozone layer. That was clear. That law was passed around 1988 or so.

    If he did the freon inflate thing in 1985 it would have been legal.

    It actually effected my job in particular.

    I worked for a scientific outfit called Varian ATT. We used freon to cool the machines I worked on, Ion Implanters. Google them if you want to know more ...[text shortened]... as a coolant.

    So I am very familiar with the changeover from Freon to DI water as a coolant!
    It DID deplete the ozone layer. That was clear. That law was passed around 1988 or so.

    I wonder if since those days, anyone has bothered to see if the hole in the ozone layer is repaired by the banning of freon. At the time, the connection seemed tenuous at best. We are all familiar with the changeover from r12 to r135 coolant in automotive air conditioners.

    For a couple of generations we've been bamboozled by phony scientists who are really chicken littles. You've probably noticed that global warming is now climate change.