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Debates Forum

  1. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    25 Mar '11 09:23
    Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam,Aug. 5, 1990, U.N. GAOR,
    World Conf. on Hum. Rts., 4th Sess., Agenda Item 5, U.N. Doc.
    A/CONF.157/PC/62/Add.18 (1993) [English translation].


    The Nineteenth Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers (Session of Peace, Interdependence and Development), held in Cairo, Arab Republic of Egypt, from 9-14 Muharram 1411H (31 July to 5 August 1990),

    Keenly aware of the place of mankind in Islam as vicegerent of Allah on Earth;

    Recognizing the importance of issuing a Document on Human Rights in Islam that will serve as a guide for Member states in all aspects of life;

    Having examined the stages through which the preparation of this draft Document has so far, passed and the relevant report of the Secretary General;

    Having examined the Report of the Meeting of the Committee of Legal Experts held in Tehran from 26 to 28 December, 1989;

    Agrees to issue the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam that will serve as a general guidance for Member States in the Field of human rights.

    Reaffirming the civilizing and historical role of the Islamic Ummah which Allah made as the best community and which gave humanity a universal and well-balanced civilization, in which harmony is established between hereunder and the hereafter, knowledge is combined with faith, and to fulfill the expectations from this community to guide all humanity which is confused because of different and conflicting beliefs and ideologies and to provide solutions for all chronic problems of this materialistic civilization.

    In contribution to the efforts of mankind to assert human rights, to protect man from exploitation and persecution, and to affirm his freedom and right to a dignified life in accordance with the Islamic Shari'ah.

    Convinced that mankind which has reached an advanced stage in materialistic science is still, and shall remain, in dire need of faith to support its civilization as well as a self motivating force to guard its rights;

    Believing that fundamental rights and freedoms according to Islam are an integral part of the Islamic religion and that no one shall have the right as a matter of principle to abolish them either in whole or in part or to violate or ignore them in as much as they are binding divine commands, which are contained in the Revealed Books of Allah and which were sent through the last of His Prophets to complete the preceding divine messages and that safeguarding those fundamental rights and freedoms is an act of worship whereas the neglect or violation thereof is an abominable sin, and that the safeguarding of those fundamental rights and freedom is an individual responsibility of every person and a collective responsibility of the entire Ummah;

    Do hereby and on the basis of the above-mentioned principles declare as follows:


    ARTICLE 1:
    (a) All human beings form one family whose members are united by their subordination to Allah and descent from Adam. All men are equal in terms of basic human dignity and basic obligations and responsibilities, without any discrimination on the basis of race, colour, language, belief, sex, religion, political affiliation, social status or other considerations. The true religion is the guarantee for enhancing such dignity along the path to human integrity.

    (b) All human beings are Allah's subjects, and the most loved by Him are those who are most beneficial to His subjects, and no one has superiority over another except on the basis of piety and good deeds.


    ARTICLE 2:

    (a) Life is a God-given gift and the right to life is guaranteed to every human being. It is the duty of individuals, societies and states to safeguard this right against any violation, and it is prohibited to take away life except for a shari'ah prescribed reason.

    (b) It is forbidden to resort to any means which could result in the genocidal annihilation of mankind.

    (c) The preservation of human life throughout the term of time willed by Allah is a duty prescribed by Shari'ah.

    (d) Safety from bodily harm is a guaranteed right. It is the duty of the state to safeguard it, and it is prohibited to breach it without a Shari'ah-prescribed reason.


    ARTICLE 3:

    (a) In the event of the use of force and in case of armed conflict, it is not permissible to kill non-belligerents such as old men, women and children. The wounded and the sick shall have the right to medical treatment; and prisoners of war shall have the right to be fed, sheltered and clothed. It is prohibited to mutilate or dismember dead bodies. It is required to exchange prisoners of war and to arrange visits or reunions of families separated by circumstances of war.

    (b) It is prohibited to cut down trees, to destroy crops or livestock, to destroy the enemy's civilian buildings and installations by shelling, blasting or any other means.


    ARTICLE 4:

    Every human being is entitled to human sanctity and the protection of one's good name and honour during one's life and after one's death. The state and the society shall protect one's body and burial place from desecration.


    ARTICLE 5:

    (a) The family is the foundation of society, and marriage is the basis of making a family. Men and women have the right to marriage, and no restrictions stemming from race, colour or nationality shall prevent them from exercising this right.

    (b) The society and the State shall remove all obstacles to marriage and facilitate it, and shall protect the family and safeguard its welfare.


    ARTICLE 6:

    (a) Woman is equal to man in human dignity, and has her own rights to enjoy as well as duties to perform, and has her own civil entity and financial independence, and the right to retain her name and lineage.

    (b) The husband is responsible for the maintenance and welfare of the family.


    ARTICLE 7:

    (a) As of the moment of birth, every child has rights due from the parents, the society and the state to be accorded proper nursing, education and material, hygienic and moral care. Both the fetus and the mother must be safeguarded and accorded special care.

    (b) Parents and those in such like capacity have the right to choose the type of education they desire for their children, provided they take into consideration the interest and future of the children in accordance with ethical values and the principles of the Shari'ah.

    (c) Both parents are entitled to certain rights from their children, and relatives are entitled to rights from their kin, in accordance with the tenets of the shari'ah.


    ARTCLE 8:

    Every human being has the right to enjoy a legitimate eligibility with all its prerogatives and obligations in case such eligibility is lost or impaired, the person shall have the right to be represented by his/her guardian.

    ARTICLE 9:

    (a) The seeking of knowledge is an obligation and provision of education is the duty of the society and the State. The State shall ensure the availability of ways and means to acquire education and shall guarantee its diversity in the interest of the society so as to enable man to be acquainted with the religion of Islam and uncover the secrets of the Universe for the benefit of mankind.

    (b) Every human being has a right to receive both religious and worldly education from the various institutions of teaching, education and guidance, including the family, the school, the university, the media, etc., and in such an integrated and balanced manner that would develop human personality, strengthen man's faith in Allah and promote man's respect to and defence of both rights and obligations.


    ARTICLE 10:

    Islam is the religion of true unspoiled nature. It is prohibited to exercise any form of pressure on man or to exploit his poverty or ignorance in order to force him to change his religion to another religion or to atheism.


    ARTICLE 11:

    (a) Human beings are born free, and no one has the right to enslave, humiliate, oppress or exploit them, and there can be no subjugation but to Allah the Almighty.

    (b) Colonialism of all types being one of the most evil forms of enslavement is totally prohibited. Peoples suffering from colonialism have the full right to freedom and self-determination. It is the duty of all States peoples to support the struggle of colonized peoples for the liquidation of all forms of and occupation, and all States and peoples have the right to preserve their independent identity and econtrol over their wealth and natural resources.


    ARTICLE 12:


    Every man shall have the right, within the framework of the Shari'ah, to free movement and to select his place of residence whether within or outside his country and if persecuted, is entitled to seek asylum in another country. The country of refuge shall be obliged to provide protection to the asylum-seeker until his safety has been attained, unless asylum is motivated by committing an act regarded by the Shari'ah as a crime.


    ARTICLE 13:

    Work is a right guaranteed by the State and the Society for each person with capability to work. Everyone shall be free to choose the work that suits him best and which serves his interests as well as those of the society. The employee shall have the right to enjoy safety and security as well as all other social guarantees. He may not be assigned work beyond his capacity nor shall he be subjected to compulsion or exploited or harmed in any way. He shall be entitled - without any discrimination between males and females - to fair wages for his work without delay, as well as to the holidays allowances and promotions which he deserves. On his part, he shall be required to be dedicated and meticulous in his work. Should workers and employers disagree on any matter, the State shall intervene to settle the dispute and have the grievances redressed, the rights confirmed and justice enforced without bias.


    ARTICLE 14:

    Everyone shall have the right to earn a legitimate living with...
  2. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    25 Mar '11 09:24
    without monopolization, deceit or causing harm to oneself or to others. Usury (riba) is explicitly prohibited.



    ARTICLE 15:

    (a) Everyone shall have the right to own property acquired in a legitimate way, and shall be entitled to the rights of ownership without prejudice to oneself, others or the society in general. Expropriation is not permissible except for requirements of public interest and upon payment of prompt and fair compensation.

    (b) Confiscation and seizure of property is prohibited except for a necessity dictated by law.


    ARTICLE 16:

    Everyone shall have the right to enjoy the fruits of his scientific, literary, artistic or technical labour of which he is the author; and he shall have the right to the protection of his moral and material interests stemming therefrom, provided it is not contrary to the principles of the Shari'ah.



    ARTICLE 17:

    (a) Everyone shall have the right to live in a clean environment, away from vice and moral corruption, that would favour a healthy ethical development of his person and it is incumbent upon the State and society in general to afford that right.

    (b) Everyone shall have the right to medical and social care, and to all public amenities provided by society and the State within the limits of their available resources.

    (c) The States shall ensure the right of the individual to a decent living that may enable him to meet his requirements and those of his dependents, including food, clothing, housing, education, medical care and all other basic needs.


    ARTICLE 18:

    (a) Everyone shall have the right to live in security for himself, his religion, his dependents, his honour and his property.

    (b) Everyone shall have the right to privacy in the conduct of his private affairs, in his home, among his family, with regard to his property and his relationships. It is not permitted to spy on him, to place him under surveillance or to besmirch his good name. The State shall protect him from arbitrary interference.

    (c) A private residence is inviolable in all cases. It will not be entered without permission from its inhabitants or in any unlawful manner, nor shall it be demolished or confiscated and its dwellers evicted.



    ARTICLE 19:

    (a) All individuals are equal before the law, without distinction between the ruler and the ruled.

    (b) The right to resort to justice is guaranteed to everyone.

    (c) Liability is in essence personal.

    (d) There shall be no crime or punishment except as provided for in the Shari'ah.

    (e) A defendant is innocent until his guilt is proven in a fast trial in which he shall be given all the guarantees of defence.


    ARTICLE 20:

    It is not permitted without legitimate reason to arrest an individual, or restrict his freedom, to exile or to punish him. It is not permitted to subject him to physical or psychological torture or to any form of maltreatment, cruelty or indignity. Nor is it permitted to subject an individual to medical or scientific experiments without hisconsent or at the risk of his health or of his life. Nor is it permitted to promulgate emergency laws that would provide executive authority for such actions.


    ARTICLE 21:

    Taking hostages under any form or for any purpose is expressly forbidden.


    ARTICLE 22:

    (a) Everyone shall have the right to express his opinion freely in such manner as would not be contrary to the principles of the Shari'ah.

    1.. Everyone shall have the right to advocate what is right, and propagate what is good, and warn against what is wrong and evil according to the norms of Islamic Shari'ah.

    (c) Information is a vital necessity to society. It may not be exploited or misused in such a way as may violate sanctities and the dignity of Prophets, undermine moral and ethical Values or disintegrate, corrupt or harm society or weaken its faith.

    (d) It is not permitted to excite nationalistic or doctrinal hatred or to do anything that may be an incitement to any form or racial discrimination.


    ARTICLE 23:

    (a) Authority is a trust; and abuse or malicious exploitation thereof is explicitly prohibited, in order to guarantee fundamental human rights.

    (b) Everyone shall have the right to participate, directly or indirectly in the administration of his country's public affairs. He shall also have the right to assume public office in accordance with the provisions of Shari'ah.


    ARTICLE 24:

    All the rights and freedoms stipulated in this Declaration are subject to the Islamic Shari'ah.


    ARTICLE 25:

    The Islamic Shari'ah is the only source of reference for the explanation or clarification of any of the articles of this Declaration.
  3. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    25 Mar '11 09:25 / 1 edit
    So, a Muslim living in the U.K. and holding a British passport...
    which human rights charter is he obliged to observe in his
    daily life?

    Are the majority Muslim states able to be treated as equals in
    the international community when/if they pledge allegiance to
    values and principles different to others?

    What do you make out of this duplicity?
  4. 25 Mar '11 09:37
    To a British muslim living in the UK, UK law is binding. This isn't.
  5. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    25 Mar '11 11:54
    In paper, of course. But, in reality, is it like that?
  6. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    25 Mar '11 11:57
    Originally posted by Seitse
    In paper, of course. But, in reality, is it like that?
    What do you mean?
  7. Standard member finnegan
    GENS UNA SUMUS
    25 Mar '11 16:56
    Originally posted by Seitse
    So, a Muslim living in the U.K. and holding a British passport...
    which human rights charter is he obliged to observe in his
    daily life?

    Are the majority Muslim states able to be treated as equals in
    the international community when/if they pledge allegiance to
    values and principles different to others?

    What do you make out of this duplicity?
    I'm curious to hear what your point is here. On face value this reads as though faithful Muslims are receiving authoritative guidance about the status of human rights and being told that they are consistent with the teachings of Islam. That seems a good thing since in many respects, it stands in opposition to Muslim voices that are antagonistic to human rights, presumably including for example the Saudi Arabian regime, the Iranians and others in addition to Al Quaida and their like.

    Opposition to human rights principles is not confined to Muslims you know. The English Conservatives are constantly complaining about the way human rights legislation somehow infringes British autonomy, when the whole point of the exercise is to have some principles that are above national loyalties and to make all governments accountable. The US is not prepared to have its officials brought before the International Court of Human Rights to defend against charges: the same US whose founding constitution appeared to hold it as a self evident truth that it's ok to keep slaves.

    Catholic and other Christian groups in the US use their interpretation of religious teaching to fight against legislation on Women's reproductive rights, frequently acting outside the law (sometimes with violence) to pursue their goals. They seem to me to place religious teaching above human rights.

    Anyone who avocates human rights principles as rising above the narrow interests of states and governments will welcome this evidence of Muslim support, since so much of the World is Muslim. It suggests that the argument for their fundamental status is gaining ground.
  8. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    25 Mar '11 17:41
    Most of that sounds very nice, though the line that "it is prohibited to take away life except for a shari'ah prescribed reason" strikes me as a little scary.

    It is a shame, however, that this statement of laudable ideals bears so little resemblance to real life in so many Muslim countries.
  9. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    25 Mar '11 17:44
    Originally posted by sh76
    It is a shame, however, that this statement of laudable ideals bears so little resemblance to real life in so many Muslim countries.
    You advocate progress without laudable ideals for the Muslim world?

    Most of that sounds very nice, though the line that "it is prohibited to take away life except for a shari'ah prescribed reason" strikes me as a little scary.

    Do you not have capital punishment in the U.S. in accordance with your legal system?
  10. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    25 Mar '11 17:51 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by FMF
    You advocate progress without laudable ideals for the Muslim world?
    On the contrary, I advocate progress in accordance with these ideals.

    Do you not have capital punishment in the U.S. in accordance with your legal system?


    Yes, and I'm not sure I'm thrilled about that either. But in any case, I'm no expert on Sharia law (surprise!) but I'm gonna take a gander and guess that the Sharia version of the death penalty is quite a bit broader than the US'.
  11. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    25 Mar '11 18:11
    Originally posted by sh76
    On the contrary, I advocate progress in accordance with these ideals.
    So why is it that people - perhaps like yourself - seem to demand to see signs of change and yet are then so quick to poo poo any signs of change - and smother them in generalizations - when they start to be seen?
  12. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    25 Mar '11 21:20
    It is creepy to see religion and government so intimately tied together. Discrimination goes hand in hand with such systems.
  13. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    25 Mar '11 21:20
    "Everyone has the right to freedom of thought,
    conscience and religion; this right includes freedom
    to change his religion or belief"

    Guess what? There is no analogous guarantee in
    the Islamic declarations.

    As Ibn Warraq, Pakistani intellectual and founder of the
    Institute for the Secularisation of Islamic Society (ISIS),
    said it: "there are moderate Muslims, but Islam itself
    is not moderate".
  14. Standard member finnegan
    GENS UNA SUMUS
    26 Mar '11 00:34
    Originally posted by Seitse
    "Everyone has the right to freedom of thought,
    conscience and religion; this right includes freedom
    to change his religion or belief"

    Guess what? There is no analogous guarantee in
    the Islamic declarations.

    As Ibn Warraq, Pakistani intellectual and founder of the
    Institute for the Secularisation of Islamic Society (ISIS),
    said it: "there are moderate Muslims, but Islam itself
    is not moderate".
    ARTICLE 10:

    Islam is the religion of true unspoiled nature. It is prohibited to exercise any form of pressure on man or to exploit his poverty or ignorance in order to force him to change his religion to another religion or to atheism.


    Why is this not analogous?

    Definition of analogous: "adjective. similar or comparable in certain respects; Biol. similar in function but not in origin and structure." Actually I quite like the Biological definition in this case. Clearly it is not identical but if it was identical it would not be what it is, which is a statement showing how to arrive at a commitment to human rights through Islam.]

    To be fair to you I agree that the sticking point with Islam is not tolerating other religions and allowing their practice, where the teaching of the Qu'ran and the historical practice of many muslim rulers is exemplary, but rather tolerating people seeking converts other than to Islam and tolerating people who abandon Islam.

    [Christianity has the same problem (and especially it did at the time the Qu'ran was being set down). The important difference is that Christians have yielded power from the churches to secular society (not always voluntarily and only in recent centuries) while there remains a powerful linkage of religion and state in many muslim countries and Islam itself is more worldly in its scope. If the religious right in (say) the USA got its way, a lot of secular laws would change at the expense of human rights. In my direct experience, the social reaction in Ireland to conversions from Catholic to Protestant was very striking.]

    That is an anachronism which may be too hard to resolve within the terms of reference here. However, there is scope within the statement in article 10 to reduce the significance of that problem, bearing in mind that it is asking too much for religious leaders to travel too far away from the comfort zone of their followers. There is a general acceptance that the Qu'ran contains inconsistencies and curiosities, so that it requires a fresh interpretation in each place and time, and that aspects of the Qu'ran are, if you like, capable of being redundant when they are unhelpful. Another way to express this is that the Qu'ran permits many readings, and if the people learn tolerance (as advocated in article 10) any desire to respond aggressively to conversions will become an inconsistency which is resolved by extending tolerance to converts.

    It is obvious to me that states should be secular. After their experience of an Islamic state in Iran, many muslims are reaching the same opinion. But it is asking a bit much for their religious leaders to take that line! The Pope doesn't. Anglican bishops in England's House of Lords don't.
  15. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    26 Mar '11 08:44
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    It is creepy to see religion and government so intimately tied together. Discrimination goes hand in hand with such systems.
    Yup.

    That is the secret for interpreting the "no forced conversion" rule.
    One thing is the credo, the other the legal system (at least in their
    minds). Thus, even though you don't have to be one, you have to
    live under the rules. Kind of sick, actually.