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  1. Zugzwang
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    16 Feb '17 01:022 edits
    The bomber's a Canadian Sikh nationalist (not a Muslim).
    The crime is the worst case of mass murder (329 killed) in Canada's history.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_India_Flight_182

    Air India Flight 182 was an Air India flight operating on the Toronto–Montreal–
    London–Delhi route. On 23 June 1985, the Boeing 747-237B serving the flight ..
    was destroyed by a bomb at an altitude of 31,000 feet (9,400 m). It crashed into the
    Atlantic Ocean while in Irish airspace. It was the first bombing of a 747 jumbo jet.
    A total of 329 people were killed, including 268 Canadian citizens, 27 Britons and 24 Indians.
    The incident was the largest mass murder in Canadian history. It was the deadliest
    terrorist attack involving an aeroplane until the September 11, 2001, attacks.
    It is also the deadliest aircraft bombing."

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/feb/15/canada-air-india-bombing-inderjit-singh-reyat-freed

    "Canada frees man convicted for 1985 Air India bombing that killed 329 people."

    How can Canada do this without the kind of hysteria that would follow in the
    USA if it ever released a Muslim terrorist convicted of killing far fewer people?
  2. Standard memberfinnegan
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    16 Feb '17 09:39
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    The bomber's a Canadian Sikh nationalist (not a Muslim).
    The crime is the worst case of mass murder (329 killed) in Canada's history.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_India_Flight_182

    Air India Flight 182 was an Air India flight operating on the Toronto–Montreal–
    London–Delhi route. On 23 June 1985, the Boeing 747-237B serving the flight ..
    was d ...[text shortened]... follow in the
    USA if it ever released a Muslim terrorist convicted of killing far fewer people?
    Give it time and a bit more publicity.
  3. Standard membershavixmir
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    16 Feb '17 16:33
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    The bomber's a Canadian Sikh nationalist (not a Muslim).
    The crime is the worst case of mass murder (329 killed) in Canada's history.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_India_Flight_182

    Air India Flight 182 was an Air India flight operating on the Toronto–Montreal–
    London–Delhi route. On 23 June 1985, the Boeing 747-237B serving the flight ..
    was d ...[text shortened]... follow in the
    USA if it ever released a Muslim terrorist convicted of killing far fewer people?
    Because it's the law.
  4. Standard memberDeepThought
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    16 Feb '17 18:12
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    The bomber's a Canadian Sikh nationalist (not a Muslim).
    The crime is the worst case of mass murder (329 killed) in Canada's history.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_India_Flight_182

    Air India Flight 182 was an Air India flight operating on the Toronto–Montreal–
    London–Delhi route. On 23 June 1985, the Boeing 747-237B serving the flight ..
    was d ...[text shortened]... follow in the
    USA if it ever released a Muslim terrorist convicted of killing far fewer people?
    The model to look at would be the response to the release of Abdelbaset al-Megrahi.
  5. Standard membersh76
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    16 Feb '17 18:54
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    The model to look at would be the response to the release of Abdelbaset al-Megrahi.
    Right. The one where the convicted terrorist mass murderer was released on compassionate grounds because he was dying, but then lived another three years.

    That was a hoot.
  6. Zugzwang
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    16 Feb '17 22:213 edits
    Originally posted by sh76 to DeepThought
    Right. The one where the convicted terrorist mass murderer was released on
    compassionate grounds because he was dying, but then lived another three years.

    That was a hoot.
    As far as I know, there's a major difference of opinion between American and British
    relatives of the victims of the Pan Am Flight 103 bombing about who was responsible for it.
    Trusting the mainstream US media, all the Americans believe that al-Megrahi must be guilty,
    but a considerable number of British relatives suspect that he was framed and someone else did it.

    Dr Jim Swire (whose daughter was killed) founded the Justice for Megrahi campaign
    because he sincerely believes that Megrahi (whom he met) was innocent.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Swire

    Megrahi had maintained his innocence. A condition of his release on compassionate
    grounds (he was diagnosed with terminal cancer) was that he drop his appeal in Scotland.
    So Megrahi had to choose between dropping his appeal and being allowed to die at
    home or continuing his appeal and dying in prison before it could be resolved.
    He reluctantly chose the former, while denying that it was any admission of guilt.
    By the way, the doctor who diagnosed him as terminally ill gave a continuum of life
    expectancy, and Megrahi's death came at the high end, but his diagnosis was not wrong.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan_Am_Flight_103_conspiracy_theories

    I don't claim to know the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth about this case.
    But it seems to me that quite a number of intelligent people with no motive to cover up
    Libyan complicity have serious doubts that the official Scottish narrative must be the
    truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.
  7. Subscribersonhouse
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    16 Feb '17 23:10
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    The bomber's a Canadian Sikh nationalist (not a Muslim).
    The crime is the worst case of mass murder (329 killed) in Canada's history.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_India_Flight_182

    Air India Flight 182 was an Air India flight operating on the Toronto–Montreal–
    London–Delhi route. On 23 June 1985, the Boeing 747-237B serving the flight ..
    was d ...[text shortened]... follow in the
    USA if it ever released a Muslim terrorist convicted of killing far fewer people?
    He wasn't the principle though, I think he made the bombs but the two who actually did the deed were acquitted partially based on this dude's testimony.

    It's not like he had a 6 month sentence, he got a third of a century.
  8. Standard membersh76
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    17 Feb '17 13:50
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    As far as I know, there's a major difference of opinion between American and British
    relatives of the victims of the Pan Am Flight 103 bombing about who was responsible for it.
    Trusting the mainstream US media, all the Americans believe that al-Megrahi must be guilty,
    but a considerable number of British relatives suspect that he was framed and someone ...[text shortened]... the official Scottish narrative must be the
    truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.
    I still don't understand why jurisdiction over the case was conceded to Scotland. Because they plane exploded over Scotland? BFD. If it had exploded over the North Pole, would the polar bears have jurisdiction? It was an American airline, most of the people on the flight were Americans and the flight had originated in Germany with a stop in England. Scotland asserting jurisdiction over the matter seems ridiculous to me.

    Of course I also concede the possibility that al-Megrahi was innocent. But he was convicted after a trial (at which is co-defendant was acquitted) and had the chance to appeal his conviction and the appeals that were decided went against him.

    Anyway, he wasn't released based on innocence, but on "compassionate" grounds.
  9. Standard memberDeepThought
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    17 Feb '17 14:15
    Originally posted by sh76
    I still don't understand why jurisdiction over the case was conceded to Scotland. Because they plane exploded over Scotland? BFD. If it had exploded over the North Pole, would the polar bears have jurisdiction? It was an American airline, most of the people on the flight were Americans and the flight had originated in Germany with a stop in England. Scotland as ...[text shortened]... t against him.

    Anyway, he wasn't released based on innocence, but on "compassionate" grounds.
    For the same reason that Britain would not have jurisdiction over the investigation and prosecution of the murder of a British subject in the US. Sovereignty includes sovereignty over airspace.
  10. Zugzwang
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    17 Feb '17 21:31
    Originally posted by DeepThought to Sh76
    For the same reason that Britain would not have jurisdiction over the investigation and prosecution of the murder of a British subject in the US.
    Sovereignty includes sovereignty over airspace.
    Let's suppose that the wreckage of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is discovered in the Indian Ocean.
    Which country would have jurisdiction? The one with any land closest to the crash site?
  11. Standard memberDeepThought
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    17 Feb '17 21:48
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Let's suppose that the wreckage of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is discovered in the Indian Ocean.
    Which country would have jurisdiction? The one with any land closest to the crash site?
    There is no indication that that was a terrorist attack. I don't know, but the rules are probably based on established Naval rules and I imagine it would go to Malaysia as the nationality of the Captain of the plane.
  12. Zugzwang
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    17 Feb '17 22:10
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    There is no indication that that was a terrorist attack. I don't know, but the rules are
    probably based on established Naval rules and I imagine it would go to Malaysia as the nationality of the Captain of the plane.
    One of my points was that, after discovering the wreckage, doesn't someone have to do
    an investigation to rule out that it was a terrorist attack rather than just assuming it?

    The closest analogy of which I recall now was the investigation of Air France Flight 447,
    which took off from Brazil and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean en route to France.
  13. Standard memberDeepThought
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    17 Feb '17 22:44
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    One of my points was that, after discovering the wreckage, doesn't someone have to do
    an investigation to rule out that it was a terrorist attack rather than just assuming it?

    The closest analogy of which I recall now was the investigation of Air France Flight 447,
    which took off from Brazil and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean en route to France.
    I had a look at the Wikipedia page on flight 447, it contains the following sentence: "As the aircraft was of French registration and crashed over international waters, this is the responsibility of the French government, under the ICAO convention." - which means my guess was correct, except it is the country of registration of the aircraft rather than the nationality of the pilot that is the relevant variable.
  14. Zugzwang
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    17 Feb '17 22:581 edit
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    I had a look at the Wikipedia page on flight 447, it contains the following sentence: "As the aircraft was of French registration and crashed over international waters, this is the responsibility of the French government, under the ICAO convention." - which means my guess was correct, except it is the country of registration of the aircraft rather than the nationality of the pilot that is the relevant variable.
    In 1973, Israel shot down a LIbyan airliner (flown by a French pilot) which had strayed
    over the Israeli-occupied Sinai (captured from Egypt), killing 108 out of 113 persons aboard.
    The crew (five members) was all French, working on contract between LIbya and Air France.
    One of the more bizarre Israeli rationalizations for shooting down the Libyan airliner was
    that Israel was afraid that it could make a kamikaze attack against a military installation.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libyan_Arab_Airlines_Flight_114
  15. Standard memberDeepThought
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    17 Feb '17 23:46
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    In 1973, Israel shot down a LIbyan airliner (flown by a French pilot) which had strayed
    over the Israeli-occupied Sinai (captured from Egypt), killing 108 out of 113 persons aboard.
    The crew (five members) was all French, working on contract between LIbya and Air France.
    One of the more bizarre Israeli rationalizations for shooting down the Libyan airli ...[text shortened]... gainst a military installation.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libyan_Arab_Airlines_Flight_114
    Relevance?
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