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Debates Forum

  1. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    30 Jul '13 20:38
    Cooperative games involve players working together toward a common goal rather than working to defeat each other. They typically have a built in opposition, or condition, against which the players must work cohesively in order to be successful and 'win.' This would be a way of instilling values of cooperation and teamwork in children instead of typical games which instill the values of pitiless despots.

    As it turns out, there are several manufacturers of cooperative games on the market (who knew?) with numerous titles to choose from. From peaceablekingdom.com we have titles like:

    The Great Cheese Chase
    How to Play:
    The Great Chase is On! Start with one player spinning the spinner. If you land on a 1 or 2, move any mouse forward one or two spaces. If the spinner lands on Tiger the Cat, move Tiger one space. Takes turns spinning! If Tiger lands on a mouse, that mouse goes back to the start! Land on the catnip and tuck it aside to use later to move Tiger back one space. Get all three mice to the attic before Tiger gets there and you all win!
    Why families love this item:
    The Great Cheese Chase, like Peaceable Kingdom's other cooperative games, emphasizes play, not competition. The focus is on playing for fun, working together and helping one another!


    familypastimes.com offers titles like:

    Earth Game
    No, not a war game but a peace game!
    Players look after Fictional Nations, managing resources and solving the emerging problems. You have to be quick thinking and compassionate to deal with rapidly changing circumstances. What to do? Try Consultation, Trade Agreements, Economic Communities, training and deploying Peace Armies to cool out conflict, Planetary Meetings…
    The game is won when Spaceship Earth’s problems are solved. The game is lost if you allow a World War to break out.


    and:

    New America
    Given our economic and social problems, this game is prophetic. Players act as Research and Development teams trying to redesign North America’s Social-Economic System before it’s too late. The focus is on Energy and Resources, but all fields are explored. Whatever the interest, this game tries to address it.
    Very suitable for thinking friends, high school and college classes. Designed to provoke discussion among mature, thinking people!


    The question is whether people think these type of games are a good way to instill cooperative values in children, or is it merely a communist plot designed to weaken our resolve? I'm leaning toward the former, but who can say for sure?
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    30 Jul '13 20:39
    The idea of cooperative sports interests me.
  3. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    30 Jul '13 20:43 / 1 edit
    Here's a good one from familypastimes.com:

    Beautiful Place
    An ecology game for children! Planet Earth can be a beautiful place, shared by all. Sadly, it has been harmed and made ugly in lots of ways. Players work together to restore the beauty. Can they do it before the dark pollution clouds encircle the beautiful place? They have a much better chance if they work together.

    Environmental concepts are presented in a simple way. Or, just play it as an exciting nature game.
  4. 30 Jul '13 20:46
    Originally posted by rwingett
    Cooperative games involve players working together toward a common goal rather than working to defeat each other. They typically have a built in opposition, or condition, against which the players must work cohesively in order to be successful and 'win.' This would be a way of instilling values of cooperation and teamwork in children instead of typical game ...[text shortened]... lot designed to weaken our resolve? I'm leaning toward the former, but who can say for sure?
    I play cooperative games with my children. We also play competitive games. Losing at games is good for kids. They learn to deal with disappointment on a small scale so they can be better ready for it when it's serious.
  5. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    30 Jul '13 20:46
    Or the following:

    Farmers Market
    We are customers visiting the Market. Some times we buy things. Some times we just look. Sometimes we return stuff. It’s up to us to decide what to buy or just look at. Each Vendor must sell enough to be able to come back another day. If they don’t make some money or even lose money, they will leave.

    So, the object is to watch out for everyone’s welfare. To do this well, we must discuss, plan, & problem-solve together, so everyone will enjoy some success. Lots of decision making for each player. The basic game plays quickly, with an advanced game for older players.
  6. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    30 Jul '13 20:47
    Originally posted by dryhump
    I play cooperative games with my children. We also play competitive games. Losing at games is good for kids. They learn to deal with disappointment on a small scale so they can be better ready for it when it's serious.
    Which cooperative games do you play?
  7. 30 Jul '13 20:55
    Originally posted by rwingett
    Cooperative games involve players working together toward a common goal rather than working to defeat each other. They typically have a built in opposition, or condition, against which the players must work cohesively in order to be successful and 'win.' This would be a way of instilling values of cooperation and teamwork in children instead of typical game ...[text shortened]... lot designed to weaken our resolve? I'm leaning toward the former, but who can say for sure?
    "...are a good way to instill cooperative values in children..."
    --Rwingett

    You (Rwingett) seem to act as though 'cooperative values' already must
    have been instilled in the parents, but that's not necessarily the case.

    Have you ever studied game theory (a branch of mathematics)?
  8. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    30 Jul '13 21:02
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    "...are a good way to instill cooperative values in children..."
    --Rwingett

    You (Rwingett) seem to act as though 'cooperative values' already must
    have been instilled in the parents, but that's not necessarily the case.

    Have you ever studied game theory (a branch of mathematics)?
    I am aware of game theory, of course, but I have not studied it. There doesn't seem to much point to it. If a cooperative strategy is the strongest, then nothing more need be known. If a cooperative strategy is not the strongest, then game theory is worthless and can be discarded.
  9. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    30 Jul '13 21:06
    Cooperative games don't need to be uber sanitized hippy games about ecology. Realm of the Mad God is a free online cooperative game; World of Warcraft is also cooperative.
  10. 31 Jul '13 00:24
    Originally posted by rwingett
    I am aware of game theory, of course, but I have not studied it. There doesn't seem to much point to it. If a cooperative strategy is the strongest, then nothing more need be known. If a cooperative strategy is not the strongest, then game theory is worthless and can be discarded.
    Many multi-player games include both competitive and cooperative elements. I suggest finding out what kids enjoy by exposing them to both.

    The Golf channel has a game show called Big Break, in which there is a final winner, but in which players are divided onto teams, until players are eliminated to the final four.

    Cooperation is strong in people, as is the survival instinct.
  11. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    31 Jul '13 02:46
    Originally posted by rwingett
    Cooperative games involve players working together toward a common goal rather than working to defeat each other. They typically have a built in opposition, or condition, against which the players must work cohesively in order to be successful and 'win.' This would be a way of instilling values of cooperation and teamwork in children instead of typical game ...[text shortened]... lot designed to weaken our resolve? I'm leaning toward the former, but who can say for sure?
    The Great Cheese Chase is really a game for one.
    You could just as well play any solitaire game and take turns with any number.
  12. 31 Jul '13 11:27 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by rwingett
    Which cooperative games do you play?
    'Halo,' 'C.O.D', etc, there are any number of games with the cooperative option.
  13. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    31 Jul '13 13:11
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    'Halo,' 'C.O.D', etc, there are any number of games with the cooperative option.
    Going around killing people hardly seems to fit in with the cooperative ethos, even if it's a team effort. Here's an idea - how about we make a game where each person plays the manager of a concentration camp. Then they have to "cooperate" to kill as many Jews as possible. That's cooperation on a small scale, but its antithesis on a larger one.
  14. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    31 Jul '13 13:16
    Originally posted by normbenign
    Many multi-player games include both competitive and cooperative elements. I suggest finding out what kids enjoy by exposing them to both.

    The Golf channel has a game show called Big Break, in which there is a final winner, but in which players are divided onto teams, until players are eliminated to the final four.

    Cooperation is strong in people, as is the survival instinct.
    I think the role cooperation plays in human (and animal) societies is vastly underrated.
  15. Subscriber Wajoma
    Die Cheeseburger
    31 Jul '13 13:22
    Originally posted by rwingett
    I am aware of game theory, of course, but I have not studied it. There doesn't seem to much point to it. If a cooperative strategy is the strongest, then nothing more need be known. If a cooperative strategy is not the strongest, then game theory is worthless and can be discarded.
    I'm with you on this one, the 'games' in game theory are shaped to get certain answers, usually the game controller doles out some kind of unearned value, he then twiddles the dials to get any outcome he wants, game theory proves nothing about economics nor human behaviour except within the confines of preset game criteria.