Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Joined
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    21 Jul '17 16:481 edit
    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/opioid-crisis-tennessee-judge-neonatal-abstinence-syndrome-birth-control-inmate/

    Where do drug babies end up when they go to school? That's right, special ed classes because their brains are screwed up from the drugs their parents took.

    http://www.drugrehab.org/drug-addiction-and-babies-long-term-effects/

    https://www.ericdigests.org/pre-9216/drug.htm

    Today, the first crack-affected children are beginning to walk through the doors of public schools across the country. Many members of this new "bio-underclass," a term coined by drug abuse expert Douglas Besharov, will require special services for developmental, behavioral, psychosocial, and learning problems caused by drug exposure. As more and more drug-affected children approach school age, school personnel must be prepared to attend to the special needs of these children and their families/caregivers.

    Special needs kids become special needs adults. Just what a socialized nation needs, more people sucking from the system.
  2. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    iEn guardia, Ingles!
    tinyurl.com/y43jqfyd
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    21 Jul '17 17:362 edits
    Trump is paying Mexico now

    http://www.insightcrime.org/news-analysis/us-fund-mexico-opium-eradication-hit-heroin-crisis-home-report

    EDIT - The "first" crack babies? They've been around since the '90s.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=126478643
  3. Joined
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    21 Jul '17 18:29
    Originally posted by @eladar
    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/opioid-crisis-tennessee-judge-neonatal-abstinence-syndrome-birth-control-inmate/

    Where do drug babies end up when they go to school? That's right, special ed classes because their brains are screwed up from the drugs their parents took.

    http://www.drugrehab.org/drug-addiction-and-babies-long-term-effects/

    https://www.er ...[text shortened]... special needs adults. Just what a socialized nation needs, more people sucking from the system.
    Nonsense.

    All we need is more free narcan and clean free clean needles and legalize all drugs.

    It'll be alright. 😛
  4. Joined
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    21 Jul '17 18:32
    Originally posted by @whodey
    Nonsense.

    All we need is more free narcan and clean free clean needles and legalize all drugs.

    It'll be alright. 😛
    How can you live in a free society if things aren't free?
  5. Joined
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    21 Jul '17 20:15
    Originally posted by @athousandyoung
    Trump is paying Mexico now

    http://www.insightcrime.org/news-analysis/us-fund-mexico-opium-eradication-hit-heroin-crisis-home-report

    EDIT - The "first" crack babies? They've been around since the '90s.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=126478643
    So you are saying druggies have been poisoning this society's future for a while now.
  6. Behind the scenes
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    21 Jul '17 22:501 edit
    Originally posted by @eladar
    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/opioid-crisis-tennessee-judge-neonatal-abstinence-syndrome-birth-control-inmate/

    Where do drug babies end up when they go to school? That's right, special ed classes because their brains are screwed up from the drugs their parents took.

    http://www.drugrehab.org/drug-addiction-and-babies-long-term-effects/

    https://www.er ...[text shortened]... special needs adults. Just what a socialized nation needs, more people sucking from the system.
    Special needs kids become special needs adults. Just what a socialized nation needs, more people sucking from the system.


    That's right Eladar. Let's ignore the fact that for every 1 dollar America spends on social welfare, 2 dollars is given away to the Fortune 500 as subsidies, grants, and other Corporate Welfare goodies. Remember: This is America, only the rich should be allowed to suck from the system!! 😠
  7. Joined
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    21 Jul '17 22:55
    Originally posted by @mchill
    Special needs kids become special needs adults. Just what a socialized nation needs, more people sucking from the system.


    Let's ignore the fact that for every 1 dollar America spends on social welfare, 2 dollars is given away to the Fortune 500 as subsidies, grants, and other Corporate Welfare goodies. Remember: This is America, only the rich should be allowed to suck from the system!! 😠
    So you are arguing that drug use is directly to blsme for brain damaged kids?

    These kids will never highly educated because their development as a fetus was retarded by drug abuse.

    True these kids can learn something, just not at a high enough level to do anything but low skilled jobs which are quickly becoming obsolete due to robotics.
  8. Behind the scenes
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    21 Jul '17 23:033 edits
    Originally posted by @eladar
    So you are arguing that drug use is directly to blsme for brain damaged kids?

    These kids will never highly educated because their development as a fetus was retarded by drug abuse.

    True these kids can learn something, just not at a high enough level to do anything but low skilled jobs which are quickly becoming obsolete due to robotics.
    I'm arguing that drug use should be treated as an illness, not a crime. I know it gives one emotional gratification to "lock up the druggies" but that's not going to solve the problem. Perhaps a few less taxpayer supported corporate retreats, taxpayer supported 7 and 8 figure CEO salaries, tax payer supported golden parachutes, tax payer supported severance packages, taxpayer supported corporate limousine fleets, taxpayer supported corporate jets, and a tiny bit more compassion shown to those in genuine need wouldn't be such a bad idea. But that's not how we do things in America, is it??

    P.S. Maybe you should start calculating the cost of incarcerating all these people as opposed to providing medical treatment.😲
  9. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    iEn guardia, Ingles!
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    21 Jul '17 23:523 edits
    Originally posted by @eladar
    So you are saying druggies have been poisoning this society's future for a while now.
    Yep. In the '20's they tried to stop alcohol. They failed.

    http://www.healthline.com/health/fetal-alcohol-syndrome

    Coca-Cola was originally made from...Cocaine and Cola.
  10. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    The Axe man
    Brisbane,QLD
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    22 Jul '17 00:11
    Originally posted by @eladar
    So you are saying druggies have been poisoning this society's future for a while now.
    No the guys with guns have
  11. Joined
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    22 Jul '17 00:15
    Originally posted by @karoly-aczel
    No the guys with guns have
    Who dies more, from guns or drugs?

    Yet, Dims want to only target guns.

    Says a lot.
  12. Joined
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    22 Jul '17 00:27
    This article first appeared on Reason.com.

    While more Americans are coming around to the idea that drug addiction should be treated as a public-health issue rather than a crime, the recent rise in opioid overdoses threatens this shift in public opinion, especially in the areas most ravaged by this new epidemic.

    In Cincinnati—my hometown— 174 overdoses took place in less than one week last year. Many counties in Ohio no longer have enough room to store all of the bodies of overdose victims, forcing the state to lend out mobile morgues that are normally reserved for large-scale disasters. The lieutenant governor of the state has even opened up about her family's struggle with opioid addiction.

    Daily Emails and Alerts - Get the best of Newsweek delivered to your inbox

    The desperation to end this epidemic has not brought out the best in everyone. Recently, Middletown, Ohio, city councilman Dan Picard proposed that paramedics not respond to addicts upon a third overdose.

    Critics decried the proposal as unbelievably cruel. Picard countered that many didn't understand just how bad the situation had gotten in his city, where "out-of-the-box thinking" was now required.

    By Picard's estimation, each overdose response costs the city $1,104. At this rate, he says, emergency services eventually won't be able to respond to other calls and "the city's going to run out of money." The city, meanwhile, is not even sure Picard's proposal is legal. However if lawyers determine that it is, it will come up for a city council vote.

    Should the proposal pass, supporters may be surprised at how little it does to stop the onslaught of overdose calls. Middletown Fire Chief Paul Lotti, a critic of the proposal, noted that 85 percent of the department's overdose runs involve first-time callers, who would not be subject to the three-strikes rule.



    Effective or not, the policy still raises ethical concerns. Paramedics should not become, at the direction of ill-informed politicians, arbiters of who deserves to live and who deserves to die based on one's lifestyle choices. Even the sorts of serial overdosers who grab headlines—such as a Dayton, Ohio, man who has been revived by paramedics twenty times —do not deserve to just be left for dead in the streets.

    Addicts need access to treatment, not ultimatums.

    But seldom is treatment readily available. An arcane federal law has inhibited the growth of drug-treatment centers in places where they are needed the most. Centers that accept Medicaid patients are prohibited from having more than sixteen beds.

    With a population of less than 50,000, Middletown has already seen 577 overdoses in 2017 alone. Permitting drug-treatment centers to expand at the local level would be a step in the right direction, giving addicts more opportunities to get the help they need and relieving pressure on emergency services and overcrowded jails.

    More treatment centers are only one part of the equation, of course. Currently, these centers are limited in what they can provide for addicts by America's outdated drug laws. When Switzerland experienced a heroin epidemic in the early 1990s, it started treating addicts with substitution therapy, using opiates like methadone to taper off addiction to other opiates and even giving prescription heroin to some heavy users. It worked.

    Methadone treatment is becoming more common in the U.S., despite being hampered by Medicaid rules regarding its use, but the nation is still a long way off from taking on major reforms like the Swiss did.

    In fact, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is still sticking to its old ways of prohibiting any drug they set their eyes on, including Kratom, another substitute drug addicts can use in place of more dangerous opioids.

    Jessica, a homeless addict, looks at the heroin encampment where she typically lives in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on April 10, 2017. In North Philadelphia, railroad gulch as it is known, is ground zero in Philadelphia?s opioid epidemic. People come from throughout the city, and some as far away as the Midwest, for heroin that is remarkably cheap and pure at the largest heroin market on the East coast.


    Despite the rhetoric of the DEA and other government regulators, drug prohibition has made many drugs like heroin far more dangerous than they would be otherwise.

    Large spikes in overdose deaths often involve influxes of heroin laced with synthetic opioids like fentanyl or carfentanil, which are far more potent than heroin itself. Because these drugs are bought on the black market, users have no way of knowing what they're really buying, and thus no way to adjust their dosing accordingly when synthetics are in play.

    This doesn't seem to matter to the DEA. U.S. drug-prohibition laws aren't set up to solve drug addiction so much as satisfy the need to punish what is viewed as bad behavior (and make Uncle Sam a few bucks in the process).

    Picard himself says that the proposed three-strikes rule for drug overdoses in Middletown is "not a proposal to solve the drug problem." He says he wants to "put a fear" in people thinking about overdosing in his town.

    But drug addiction makes people do irrational things. Addicts are not going to ask themselves if they're within Middletown's city limits before shooting up.

    As long as politicians and government officials continue to view the opioid epidemic as a war to be fought against drug users, rather than a battle to save them, many more lives will be lost.
    Ben Haller is a summer 2017 Burton C. Gray Memorial Intern with Reason magazine.


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  13. Joined
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    22 Jul '17 00:35
    Originally posted by @mchill
    I'm arguing that drug use should be treated as an illness, not a crime. I know it gives one emotional gratification to "lock up the druggies" but that's not going to solve the problem. Perhaps a few less taxpayer supported corporate retreats, taxpayer supported 7 and 8 figure CEO salaries, tax payer supported golden parachutes, tax payer supported severance ...[text shortened]... culating the cost of incarcerating all these people as opposed to providing medical treatment.😲
    Sure, treat it like a medical problem and sterilize them the first time a child is born messed up due to drug use.

    Sterilize both the male and female if the male can be identified.
  14. Joined
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    22 Jul '17 00:36
    Originally posted by @whodey
    This article first appeared on Reason.com.

    While more Americans are coming around to the idea that drug addiction should be treated as a public-health issue rather than a crime, the recent rise in opioid overdoses threatens this shift in public opinion, especially in the areas most ravaged by this new epidemic.

    In Cincinnati—my hometown— 174 overdoses ...[text shortened]... 7 Burton C. Gray Memorial Intern with Reason magazine.


    Request Reprint or Submit Correction
    OD is a good solution too.
  15. Joined
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    22 Jul '17 01:06
    Originally posted by @whodey
    Who dies more, from guns or drugs?

    Yet, Dims want to only target guns.

    Says a lot.
    For young adults drugs kill more than guns.
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