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  1. Standard member vivify
    rain
    13 May '16 00:46 / 2 edits
    Below is an interesting video on how Florence Nightingale caused the stigmatization of male nursing. For those who don't like to click on videos, you can read the following excerpt from the article, "Just Call Us Nurses: Men in Nursing":

    YouTube

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/768914

    Men: Just Nurses

    Their niche is small -- just about 7% of the professional workforce in the United States, and very slowly expanding. For their choice of career, many have overcome prejudices, bias, misconceptions, and outright criticism. Some dislike the word "male," believing this to be an unnecessary qualifier. They are nurses, and they happen to be men.

    Men's History of Caretaking

    Nearly every article and book about men in nursing describes the long history that men have as caregivers of the sick. So what happened? When nursing grew into a profession in the late 19th century, with uniform standards of education and practice, few men were found among the ranks of these new nurses. This was hardly surprising, for at the time, nursing was one of the only professions open to women, whereas men had countless better-paying and more respected career options.

    Florence Nightingale is widely blamed for the "demise of men" in nursing, because she believed that the organization and supervision of nursing care should be taken out of the hands of men. In fact, Nightingale has been quoted as saying that men were not suited to nursing. Her reforms encouraged "gentlewomen" to replace the unskilled nurses who had previously been taking care of the sick. Subsequently, "nursing" became synonymous with "women's work," making it an uphill battle for a man to become a nurse. Men continued to be represented in nursing, but their numbers were small.

    The graduating class of 1899 of the Victoria General Hospital, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Courtesy of Victoria General Hospital Nurses Alumni Archives.
    Although a few schools of nursing for men operated in North America in the early 20th century, most hospital schools of nursing (the primary setting for the education and training of nurses) enforced inconsistent policies about the admission of men. With the passage of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, it was no longer possible for educational programs to discriminate against any person on the basis of sex.

    Men crawled, rather than raced, to the profession of nursing. The proportion of men in the nursing workforce climbed gradually, from 2.7% in 1980 to 6.6% in 2008 -- not as swift as expected or hoped, but faster than the growth of the total registered nurse population. (In comparison, women in medicine grew from 7% in 1969 to 48% today).

    (Read more in the link.)
  2. 13 May '16 01:01
    Originally posted by vivify
    Below is an interesting video on how Florence Nightingale caused the stigmatization of male nursing. For those who don't like to click on videos, you can read the following excerpt from the article, "Just Call Us Nurses: Men in Nursing":

    [youtube]XzpjLSzAJvk[/youtube]

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/768914

    Men: Just Nurses

    Their niche is smal ...[text shortened]... In comparison, women in medicine grew from 7% in 1969 to 48% today).

    (Read more in the link.)
    After my surgery, nearly two years ago, I had two 4 day stays in hospitals. My male nurses were absolutely the best. A couple of female nurses were close, but none compared to the two men.

    I wonder if the response is similar with female patients?
  3. 13 May '16 01:32
    Didn't Florence Nightingale come back from the Crimean and take to her bed, claiming she was at death's door, and was a hypochondriac and stayed bedridden for like 60 years until she died at 90 or so?
  4. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    13 May '16 02:46
    Originally posted by FishHead111
    Didn't Florence Nightingale come back from the Crimean and take to her bed, claiming she was at death's door, and was a hypochondriac and stayed bedridden for like 60 years until she died at 90 or so?
    No.
    She wasn't much of a nurse though, or a heroine.
    But a reasonably good Mathematician.

    The story of Mary Seacole is more inspiring.
    She attended wounded men on the battle-field not hundreds of miles away.
  5. 13 May '16 06:38
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    No.
    She wasn't much of a nurse though, or a heroine.
    But a reasonably good Mathematician.

    The story of Mary Seacole is more inspiring.
    She attended wounded men on the battle-field not hundreds of miles away.
    The people who make the most difference are the ones who see the big picture and change policy, rather than the ones who go out and do the drudge work. So although they are both admirable people and Mary might be more inspiring, Florence had a much bigger positive impact overall (in the nursing arena).
  6. Subscriber Suzianne
    Misfit Queen
    13 May '16 07:57 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by vivify
    Men crawled, rather than raced, to the profession of nursing. The proportion of men in the nursing workforce climbed gradually, from 2.7% in 1980 to 6.6% in 2008 -- not as swift as expected or hoped, but faster than the growth of the total registered nurse population. (In comparison, women in medicine grew from 7% in 1969 to 48% today).
    Practically the only profession where women have held sway for years, and men are complaining that there aren't enough men in the profession.

    Well, you can certainly bet that once men hold nearly 50% of the nursing jobs, that suddenly women will be paid 80% of what the men get paid. It's pretty much a no-brainer to understand there will come a time when the glass ceiling for women will come slamming down to also affect this last bastion of women actually getting paid what they're worth.

    Edit: Not that nurses get paid what they're actually worth even now. There's been a shortage of nurses for years now, mainly driven by poor pay for the amount of education expended. But my point is that it will, at some time in the future, be even less once men are perceived as holding most of the nursing jobs. Or, perhaps, it's just that men will be paid more, while women's pay will remain the same. The gender pay gap is real and the nursing profession will not be immune.
  7. 13 May '16 08:41
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Well, you can certainly bet that once men hold nearly 50% of the nursing jobs, that suddenly women will be paid 80% of what the men get paid. It's pretty much a no-brainer to understand there will come a time when the glass ceiling for women will come slamming down to also affect this last bastion of women actually getting paid what they're worth.
    Sexual discrimination in the work place has little to do with how many of a particular sex work in the profession.

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/854372
    The income sex gap among nurses favors men to about the same extent that it favors male physicians, even though about 90% of nurses are women.
  8. Subscriber Wajoma
    Die Cheeseburger
    13 May '16 08:50 / 1 edit
    I blame Gaylord Fokker
  9. Standard member vivify
    rain
    13 May '16 10:43 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Practically the only profession where women have held sway for years, and men are complaining that there aren't enough men in the profession.
    I dont think men are complaining about their numbers. The point is that men who do work as nurses shouldn't be mocked for doing so.
  10. 13 May '16 13:05
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    No.
    She wasn't much of a nurse though, or a heroine.
    But a reasonably good Mathematician.

    The story of Mary Seacole is more inspiring.
    She attended wounded men on the battle-field not hundreds of miles away.
    Actually she was a hypochondriac, she spent the last 57 years of her life almost entirely bedridden:
    http://www.toptenz.net/top-10-famous-hypochondriacs.php
  11. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    13 May '16 13:09
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Practically the only profession where women have held sway for years, and men are complaining that there aren't enough men in the profession.

    Well, you can certainly bet that once men hold nearly 50% of the nursing jobs, that suddenly women will be paid 80% of what the men get paid. It's pretty much a no-brainer to understand there will come a time when ...[text shortened]... will remain the same. The gender pay gap is real and the nursing profession will not be immune.
    Society can function without surgeons, but it fails miserably when there are no nurses.

    - M.B. -
  12. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    14 May '16 03:13
    Originally posted by FishHead111
    Actually she was a hypochondriac, she spent the last 57 years of her life almost entirely bedridden:
    http://www.toptenz.net/top-10-famous-hypochondriacs.php
    I think you should use a more authoritative source than "toptenz"!

    She was very ill for many years. For 25 years she suffered with
    brucellosis (Crimean Fever) and was blind for the last ten years of her life.
    Not a hypochondriac.

    Next time you are in London visit the Florence Nightingale Museum.
    I used to take my class there.
  13. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    14 May '16 03:13
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    The people who make the most difference are the ones who see the big picture and change policy, rather than the ones who go out and do the drudge work. So although they are both admirable people and Mary might be more inspiring, Florence had a much bigger positive impact overall (in the nursing arena).
    Yes you are right. I just think she is remembered for the wrong reasons.
  14. Standard member vivify
    rain
    14 May '16 11:14 / 2 edits
    Since the word "nursing" can also refer to breastfeeding (a "wet nurse" was a woman who breastfed the children of wealthy women, dating back hundreds of years), I expect the term "nurse" will be changed one day to something more gender neutral. Maybe "hospital worker" or something like that.
  15. 14 May '16 11:23 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by vivify
    I expect the term "nurse" will be changed one day be changed to something more gender neutral. Maybe "hospital worker" or something like that.
    It is gender neutral. Only public perception makes it otherwise. Most people do not confuse being a nurse with being a 'wet nurse' or breast feeding. And a father can nurse a child just as much as mother can. It doesn't just refer to giving milk. Nursing is about providing care.
    Another phrase to consider is 'nurse child' where a child is given to another family to raise. Again, no milk required. That is why the 'wet' part of 'wet nurse' is necessary. It refers specifically to nurse by means of giving milk.