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Debates Forum

  1. 12 Oct '13 15:35 / 2 edits
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/47841795@N08/4380901474/

    Damn right we will.
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    12 Oct '13 18:24
    Originally posted by KilgoreTrout15
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/47841795@N08/4380901474/

    Damn right we will.
    Another murder fantasy. You're such a stereotypical Nordic...
  3. 12 Oct '13 19:39
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Another murder fantasy. You're such a stereotypical Nordic...
    Ain't a fantasy pedro, it happened.
    Wanna talk about the mexican-American War and how great "your people" did when they outnumbered the US forces by at least 4 to 1 in every battle?
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    12 Oct '13 19:42 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KilgoreTrout15
    Ain't a fantasy pedro, it happened.
    Wanna talk about the mexican-American War and how great "your people" did when they outnumbered the US forces by at least 4 to 1 in every battle?
    That's because we're not stupid enough to get out there on the front lines where we can get shot.

    How many white Americans died in that war?

    How many white "Mexicans"?

    It's just a different way of thinking.
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    12 Oct '13 20:40 / 1 edit
    In 84 AD, the Roman Legions with their Nordic auxiliaries fought against the Celtic Caledonians in Scotland at a place called Mons Graupius.

    It was a classic demonstration of the relationships between Latins, Germanics and Celts. The elite and valuable Roman legionaires were held in reserve while the Nordics with their trademark love for shedding blood charged into the Celtic line.

    The Nordics slaughtered the Celts under orders from the Romans who watched from the rear.

    Time Commanders on the Battle of Mons Graupius:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7yu9zjOqvo&t=40m10s
  6. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    12 Oct '13 23:04
    Pedro is a fine Hispanic name e.g.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedro_de_Alvarado
  7. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    14 Oct '13 18:25
    Today we honor Colombus, who sailed as a servant of the Catholic Monarchs of Spain to discover a westward route to India and found America instead. He claimed his new discoveries in the name of Spain and the Roman Catholic Church.
  8. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    17 Oct '13 19:52 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by KilgoreTrout15
    Ain't a fantasy pedro, it happened.
    Wanna talk about the mexican-American War and how great "your people" did when they outnumbered the US forces by at least 4 to 1 in every battle?
    http://www.theaesthetic.com/NewFiles/online11_battle.html

    Meanwhile, a group of Americans under Captain William Mervine came ashore in San Pedro. With about 300 men Mervine and Gillespie attempted to retake Los Angeles, only to be fought back to their ships by Californios wielding lances and a light cannon, which they had hidden in town during the occupation. The cliffs of Palos Verdes, dotted in modern times with million dollar homes, then served as a parade ground for the Californios, who fired both curses and shot at the hapless Americans who took refuge in Mervine's ship. This loss, coupled with other losses at Santa Barbara and San Diego, completed the retaking of Southern California by the Californios...

    http://www.militarymuseum.org/SanPasqual.html

    Underestimating the qualities of the Californians, notably in their horsemanship and in the superiority of the lance and lasso in close-quarter fighting, he allowed his force to rush blindly to destruction...

    Captain Johnston rode straight into a party of Pico's men who opened fire, killing him instantly. Seeing more Americans approaching, the Californians rode off again as if in retreat and Captain Moore ordered his men to continue their charge. The chase lasted for another mile, until the American force was stretched out down the valley. Suddenly the Californians wheeled their horses around and charged the leading Americans, lances at the ready. The shock of seeing their fleeing foe turn and confront them made some of the Americans try to fire their rifles, only to discover that their powder was so damp it would not ignite. Thus disarmed, the dragoons were forced to resort to sabers and rifle butts, which were no match for Pico's lances. Captain Moore encountered Pico himself but his pistol misfired and before he could strike with his saber he was speared sixteen times by lances and fell dead from his saddle. The Americans were quite unaccustomed to this kind of melee in which the advantage always rested with the Californians' longer weapon. Almost every dragoon in the forward party suffered from the points of the willow lances. Even more surprising for the Americans, was the use made of the lasso, or reata, which Pico's men cast with unerring accuracy, pulling the dragoons from their horses and making them easy targets for the lancers. Seeing Moore mortally wounded, his brother-in-law, Lieutenant Hammond, rode to his side and died with him, pierced through and through by the lancers...

    ...When the Californians observed the appearance of Kearny's men, and how they were mounted, they remarked to each other, " Aqui vamos hacer matanza ." ("Here we are going to have a slaughter." They were mounted on fresh horses, and were armed with sharp-pointed lances and with pistols, in the use of which weapons they were very expert. A furious charge was made upon Kearny's force, whereupon all the mules ran away as fast as their legs would convey them, pursued by the Californians, who used their lances with great effect, killing about twenty-five of Kearny's men and wounding a large number (including General Kearny) of the remainder (nearly all of them in the back), who were all in the predicament of being unable to control the half-starved mules which they rode at the time of the stampede. The general, however, managed to rally his men and the mules, and, taking a position, held it against the attacking forces, who were not able to dislodge him. The Californians withdrawing from the immediate scene of action, Kearny buried his dead, while expecting that at any moment the enemy would renew the fight.

    http://www.sandiegohistory.org/journal/75summer/decline.htm

    In his widely read Decline of the Californios, historian Leonard Pitt sought to explain the rapid political and economic demise of the Spanish-speaking families who occupied and controlled California before the United States take-over in 1846. Pitt says the political demise of the Californios took longer in southern California compared with the rest of the state. Following statehood in 1849, Californios ran successfully for public offices in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles. Along with their political successes, Pitt argues that these Californios also reaped windfall profits from cattle sales during the early 1850s. They hastened their own economic demise, however, by propagating these profits, and by the 1860s their ranchos were either heavily mortgaged or in the hands of Anglo-Americans.


    =====

    This guy was a Californio criollo:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTfdiHxYivA

    A classic scene where an Anglo and a Hispanic have a duel:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7zvffHu_wo
  9. 18 Oct '13 23:02
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    [quote]http://www.theaesthetic.com/NewFiles/online11_battle.html

    Meanwhile, a group of Americans under Captain William Mervine came ashore in San Pedro. With about 300 men Mervine and Gillespie attempted to retake Los Angeles, only to be fought back to their ships by Californios wielding lances and a light cannon, which they had hidden in town duri ...[text shortened]... c scene where an Anglo and a Hispanic have a duel:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7zvffHu_wo
    Who were the world's greatest swordsmen?
  10. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    19 Oct '13 03:09
    Originally posted by normbenign
    Who were the world's greatest swordsmen?
    Tough question to answer. Swords were used in so many different ways. From gladius, to sidesword, to rapier, to German and Scottish greatswords, sabres, katanas, with and without shields, and armor, and secondary weapons...

    I'm not sure.
  11. 19 Oct '13 03:35
    Originally posted by normbenign
    Who were the world's greatest swordsmen?
    Sir Edward Scissorhands