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  1. Standard membervivify
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    14 Jan '17 21:172 edits
    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-38621092

    The Gambia's President-elect, Adama Barrow, has left the country after talks failed to persuade President Yahya Jammeh to step down.

    Nigeria's president flew to Banjul to try to broker a deal but Mr Jammeh would not relinquish power.
    Mr Barrow is now heading to Mali, where he will meet West African leaders attending a summit there.
    The former estate agent wants to resolve the transitional deadlock so he can be sworn in next week.
    President Jammeh's term ends on Thursday.

    The Supreme Court is unable to hear the challenge until May because of a shortage of judges, and Mr Jammeh says he will not step down until then.

    There are growing fears that the uncertainty could cause a refugee exodus.
    Thousands of Gambians, mostly women and children, have already crossed the border into neighbouring Senegal and further afield to Guinea-Bissau, where they do not require a visa, officials say.
    Mr Barrow won 43.3% of the vote in December's election, compared with Mr Jammeh's 39.6%. A third candidate, Mama Kandeh, got 17.1%.
  2. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    14 Jan '17 21:23
    The African Union is full of Presidents like this. Nothing will be done.
  3. Standard membervivify
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    14 Jan '17 21:43
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    The African Union is full of Presidents like this. Nothing will be done.
    From the link:

    "Ecowas, a 15-nation bloc of West African states that organised the delegation, has it said it would consider removing Mr Jammeh using military force if he refuses to step aside."

    It certainly seems like action will be taken this time. Hopefully, that point won't have to be reached.
  4. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    14 Jan '17 21:46
    Originally posted by vivify
    From the link:

    "Ecowas, a 15-nation bloc of West African states that organised the delegation, has it said it would consider removing Mr Jammeh using military force if he refuses to step aside."

    It certainly seems like action will be taken this time. Hopefully, that point won't have to be reached.
    That's the blackest of black Africa. Interestingly Goodluck Jonathan of Nigeria is the first President of that country to willingly step down. Maybe this Ecowas will take care of it after all.
  5. Joined
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    15 Jan '17 02:06
    Originally posted by vivify
    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-38621092

    The Gambia's President-elect, Adama Barrow, has left the country after talks failed to persuade President Yahya Jammeh to step down.

    Nigeria's president flew to Banjul to try to broker a deal but Mr Jammeh would not relinquish power.
    Mr Barrow is now heading to Mali, where he will meet West African leaders ...[text shortened]... December's election, compared with Mr Jammeh's 39.6%. A third candidate, Mama Kandeh, got 17.1%.
    Never mind that man, Israel just built another wall. The UN is far too concerned about one more wall to worry about this silliness.
  6. Cape Town
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    15 Jan '17 06:43
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    That's the blackest of black Africa.
    And what do you mean to imply by that?

    Various parts of Africa have different political histories, less because of the colour of the skin of the people involved and more because of the colonial histories. In general, once a successful coup occurs it is far more likely to occur again, and violence breeds violence so if the transition from colonial power was not generally peaceful, further violence is likely. How much social disruption was caused by colonisation is also a significant factor.

    As for West Africa, a conflict between two religions is also involved.

    I come from Zambia which is also the blackest of black Africa and is one of the most peaceful nations on earth.
  7. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    15 Jan '17 18:022 edits
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    And what do you mean to imply by that?

    Various parts of Africa have different political histories, less because of the colour of the skin of the people involved and more because of the colonial histories. In general, once a successful coup occurs it is far more likely to occur again, and violence breeds violence so if the transition from colonial power ...[text shortened]... bia which is also the blackest of black Africa and is one of the most peaceful nations on earth.
    I don't mean to imply anything. The region inhabited by the Ecowas nations are the ancestral homeland of the Niger-Congo people.
    Zambia is not. Bantus are in Zambia because of the Bantu expansion. Zambia was originally Khoisan territory.

    wikipedia.org/wiki/Bantu_expansion
    wikipedia.org/wiki/Niger–Congo_homeland

    wikipedia.org/wiki/Zambia

    Originally inhabited by Khoisan peoples, the region was affected by the Bantu expansion of the thirteenth century.
  8. Joined
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    15 Jan '17 18:072 edits
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    And what do you mean to imply by that?

    Various parts of Africa have different political histories, less because of the colour of the skin of the people involved and more because of the colonial histories. In general, once a successful coup occurs it is far more likely to occur again, and violence breeds violence so if the transition from colonial power ...[text shortened]... bia which is also the blackest of black Africa and is one of the most peaceful nations on earth.
    I can see that! The US was a colony that gained its independence by violence and has seen nothing but violence since. You statement has certainly been supported by US history.
  9. Zugzwang
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    15 Jan '17 20:45
    Originally posted by twhitehead to AThousandYoung
    And what do you mean to imply by that?

    Various parts of Africa have different political histories, less because of the colour of the skin of the people involved and more because of the colonial histories. In general, once a successful coup occurs it is far more likely to occur again, and violence breeds violence so if the transition f ...[text shortened]... bia which is also the blackest of black Africa and is one of the most peaceful nations on earth.
    Don't take AThousandYoung's often bizarre stereotypical comments about race or ethnicity too seriously.
    Sh76, for instance, apparently regards AThousandYoung's prejudices as amusing.
  10. Standard membervivify
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    16 Jan '17 14:261 edit
    https://www.hrw.org/africa/gambia

    Forced disappearances, arbitrary detention, torture, and other human rights violations continue under the government of President Yahya Jammeh, who came to power in a military coup in 1994. Gambian authorities routinely target voices of dissent, including journalists, human rights defenders, political opponents and critics, as well as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people. Two UN special rapporteurs, who in 2014 gained access to the country for the first time, concluded that “torture is a consistent practice” by authorities and “avoiding arrest is a necessary preoccupation” for ordinary Gambians.
  11. Standard membervivify
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    22 Jan '17 18:27
    It looks like Jammeh left peacefully (though the presence of military troops have played a part).

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-38706426
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