Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 07 Jan '16 23:33 / 1 edit
    http://www.bloomberg.com/markets/stocks/futures


    As of today, it doesn't seem to be looking so hot.

    Can China really beat a huge market loss by closing the markets a few minutes after it opens each day?

    I've been feeling like the US economy is on the brink of collapse for years now. It seems as good a time as any for a gloom and doom thread and I'm surprised no one has started one. So I did it.
  2. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    08 Jan '16 02:18
    Originally posted by Eladar
    http://www.bloomberg.com/markets/stocks/futures


    As of today, it doesn't seem to be looking so hot.

    Can China really beat a huge market loss by closing the markets a few minutes after it opens each day?

    I've been feeling like the US economy is on the brink of collapse for years now. It seems as good a time as any for a gloom and doom thread and I'm surprised no one has started one. So I did it.
    It's possible things could go down the tubes. My motto is "hope for the best, and prepare for the worst"
  3. 08 Jan '16 04:19
    Originally posted by Eladar
    http://www.bloomberg.com/markets/stocks/futures


    As of today, it doesn't seem to be looking so hot.

    Can China really beat a huge market loss by closing the markets a few minutes after it opens each day?

    I've been feeling like the US economy is on the brink of collapse for years now. It seems as good a time as any for a gloom and doom thread and I'm surprised no one has started one. So I did it.
    If it collapses, Trump winds up in the Oval Office
  4. 08 Jan '16 07:21
    It's odd to note how excited some contributors seem to get about the possibility of a new economic crisis. In any case, short-term stock market fluctuations say exactly diddly squat about "global economic health."
  5. 08 Jan '16 12:34
    Originally posted by Eladar
    I've been feeling like the US economy is on the brink of collapse for years now.
    How many years exactly? From before 2008?

    Is this just a 'feeling' based on the weather or is it based on any actual economic indicators? Or is it because the president is black?
  6. 08 Jan '16 12:35
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    It's odd to note how excited some contributors seem to get about the possibility of a new economic crisis. In any case, short-term stock market fluctuations say exactly diddly squat about "global economic health."
    You typically need significant bubbles to get a collapse. And in the early stages they look, to most people, like fantastic successes not fluctuations.
  7. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    08 Jan '16 14:05
    Originally posted by Eladar
    http://www.bloomberg.com/markets/stocks/futures


    As of today, it doesn't seem to be looking so hot.

    Can China really beat a huge market loss by closing the markets a few minutes after it opens each day?

    I've been feeling like the US economy is on the brink of collapse for years now. It seems as good a time as any for a gloom and doom thread and I'm surprised no one has started one. So I did it.
    When you constantly think think you're on the "brink of collapse" is it any wonder that nobody takes you seriously each time you say it?

    I have some free unsolicited advice for you, El: Rather than letting ghosts and terrible possibilities run your state of mind, live in the moment and be optimistic. You'll be a happier person. Try it.
  8. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    08 Jan '16 14:09
    I wonder of the large number of sci-fi successes (books, movies, TV shows, etc.) portraying dystopian futures helps cause people's pessimism about the future.

    Here's an idea: Rather than seeing a future like Harrison Bergeron or The Time Machine or The Matrix, try envisioning a future like Star Trek. If we could just convince people to do that, I'll bet the world economy would grow twice as quickly as it does now.
  9. 08 Jan '16 14:15
    Originally posted by sh76
    When you constantly think think you're on the "brink of collapse" is it any wonder that nobody takes you seriously each time you say it?

    I have some free unsolicited advice for you, El: Rather than letting ghosts and terrible possibilities run your state of mind, live in the moment and be optimistic. You'll be a happier person. Try it.
    I think Eladar just wants everyone else to be as miserable as he is.
  10. 08 Jan '16 15:33
    Originally posted by sh76
    I wonder of the large number of sci-fi successes (books, movies, TV shows, etc.) portraying dystopian futures helps cause people's pessimism about the future.

    Here's an idea: Rather than seeing a future like Harrison Bergeron or The Time Machine or The Matrix, try envisioning a future like Star Trek. If we could just convince people to do that, I'll bet the world economy would grow twice as quickly as it does now.
    Have you started working out to practice up for the hunger games sh?
  11. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    08 Jan '16 15:47
    Originally posted by whodey
    Have you started working out to practice up for the hunger games sh?
    Right. There's another good dystopian horror show training our young people to be pessimists.

    Thanks, whodey.
  12. 08 Jan '16 15:48 / 1 edit
    The biggest immediate threat to both the U.S. and global economies is the fact that the GOP dominated U.S. congress has destroyed the Dodd Frank bill and now the financial sector in the U.S. is bigger and riskier than it was in 2008. This is another balloon waiting to blow up. The Shanghai stock market is not as stable as the U.S. and European stock markets. The dips going on right now will end soon and I do not believe they reflect the U.S. economy at all. Just do not do anything stupid with your investments. If you are a U.S. citizen, vote for Bernie or even Hilary as they are your only chance that the U.S. will break up the dangerous financial monopoly that threatens all of us. In the long term, climate change is a huge threat. It is already doing serious damage to California's Sacramento Valley farms. It will lead to political and economic unrest across the globe.
  13. 08 Jan '16 19:13
    Originally posted by whodey
    If it collapses, Trump winds up in the Oval Office
    That's the wrong way 'round. If Trump winds up in the Oval Office, the US economy will collapse as hard as his own companies (and he'll end up profiting just as much). Yet another reason for me to hope you Tea-partiers really will be daft enough to vote for The Toupée.
  14. 08 Jan '16 19:22
    Originally posted by sh76
    I wonder of the large number of sci-fi successes (books, movies, TV shows, etc.) portraying dystopian futures helps cause people's pessimism about the future.

    Here's an idea: Rather than seeing a future like Harrison Bergeron or The Time Machine or The Matrix, try envisioning a future like Star Trek. If we could just convince people to do that, I'll bet the world economy would grow twice as quickly as it does now.
    Well... except that science fiction has historically tended to play on existing societal fears, not the other way around. For instance, it was politically-created fears of foreign invasion which created the alien invasion fashions of the very early (France and Germany into England) and middle (Red Scare) 20th centuries; it wasn't Invasion of the Body Snatchers which prompted the Bay of Pigs plot.
  15. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    08 Jan '16 19:45
    Originally posted by whodey
    If it collapses, Trump winds up in the Oval Office
    Trump does not want that. He wants to get in office to keep it from a collapse and to make this country great again and build a border wall and make Mexico pay for it.