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Debates Forum

  1. Standard member caissad4
    Child of the Novelty
    09 Dec '14 08:48
    This happened 18 months ago and I surmise it was not newsworthy because he survived. The police officer was suspended for a total of 3 days. That will make him think twice before shooting someone again. The concern I have is that eventually these actions/reactions by police officers will consequences like we saw in the 60's (riots). :'(
  2. 09 Dec '14 17:28
    Originally posted by caissad4
    This happened 18 months ago and I surmise it was not newsworthy because he survived. The police officer was suspended for a total of 3 days. That will make him think twice before shooting someone again. The concern I have is that eventually these actions/reactions by police officers will consequences like we saw in the 60's (riots). :'(
    The only thing that police fear more than a shooting incident, where they will be absolutely questioned by their department, their peers, and the community, is being shot dead or otherwise killed themselves.

    I've told the story before, but in 1994 I was living in a Cleveland suburb Euclid, and a coworker was going through Cleveland police academy training. One exercise they did daily was to make a traffic stop, and avoid being shot by the trainer. They never knew when he would just take the ticket, or produce a weapon. Day after day, he was shot in this exercise, a warning of just how dangerous a simple traffic stop could be. Might be a reason that big city cops sometimes just ignore violations when their primary duty isn't traffic.

    Your comments appear to be thoughtful and caring, unlike some others with similar attacks on police. I suspect that your attitudes and positions stem from not ever having been in a confrontational, life threatening situation. Is that accurate? Not to be ashamed, it is probably common of most people, who then find it difficult to understand why an armed cop fears for his life.

    In early 1967, I faced that kind of threat unarmed, two robberies one at knife point, and one at gun point. After the second, only a month after the first, I had a decision to make. Either I had to find different work, or decide to defend myself. I made the decision to carry a weapon, although at that time concealed weapons permits weren't issued to most civilians. Needless to say, I was not anxious to use my gun, but I was less willing to go out without it. I believe you will find, just by talking to a few cops, they feel the same way. They know that they have a rough road ahead if they should shoot or otherwise harm a suspect. None go out with an agenda to shoot someone over their race.
  3. 10 Dec '14 01:18
    Originally posted by normbenign
    The only thing that police fear more than a shooting incident, where they will be absolutely questioned by their department, their peers, and the community, is being shot dead or otherwise killed themselves.

    I've told the story before, but in 1994 I was living in a Cleveland suburb Euclid, and a coworker was going through Cleveland police academy train ...[text shortened]... shoot or otherwise harm a suspect. None go out with an agenda to shoot someone over their race.
    My buddy, a deputy sheriff at the time, took a round from a hunting rifle right through the front door, while responding to a domestic dispute.... those are some of the most dangerous calls to respond too.. so if you want to question what they do, perhaps one needs to play a few rounds in the officers shoes?
  4. 10 Dec '14 01:58 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Hugh Glass
    My buddy, a deputy sheriff at the time, took a round from a hunting rifle right through the front door, while responding to a domestic dispute.... those are some of the most dangerous calls to respond too.. so if you want to question what they do, perhaps one needs to play a few rounds in the officers shoes?
    no, one doesn't.


    i don't have to fly a plane once or twice to demand my pilot not be incompetent.
    i don't have to work in constructions just to have the right to demand my house, the house i paid people to build, doesn't collapse on my head.


    cops are paid to serve and protect. cops are paid to apprehend criminals, not execute them. i don't have to have been a cop to ask just what the hell happened to make one shoot an unarmed man, or choke someone to death, or shoot a 12 year old holding a toy gun on a playground. i bloody pay the cops salary out of my taxes.

    what you keep blurting here is preposterous. let's have only cops judging cops, that's what's fair according to you.
  5. Standard member caissad4
    Child of the Novelty
    10 Dec '14 02:12
    Originally posted by normbenign
    Your comments appear to be thoughtful and caring, unlike some others with similar attacks on police. I suspect that your attitudes and positions stem from not ever having been in a confrontational, life threatening situation. Is that accurate?
    At 14 years old I was attacked by a drunk with a shotgun in Boston. I still carry a scar on my temple from that. At 17 I was robbed at gunpoint on a bus in New Orleans. At 18 I was held at gunpoint on a Pensacola street while 2 carloads of men switched cars (with each other, I was walking). Five years ago I was robbed at gunpoint at the hotel I work at. I know many of the cops who patrol near the hotel and make sure they know that they are welcome to get coffee and/or use the restrooms.
  6. 10 Dec '14 18:19
    Originally posted by Zahlanzi
    no, one doesn't.


    i don't have to fly a plane once or twice to demand my pilot not be incompetent.
    i don't have to work in constructions just to have the right to demand my house, the house i paid people to build, doesn't collapse on my head.


    cops are paid to serve and protect. cops are paid to apprehend criminals, not execute them. i don't have ...[text shortened]... ng here is preposterous. let's have only cops judging cops, that's what's fair according to you.
    Perhaps its not as easy as you think to deal with large people who are committing crime and then resist arrest. Maybe we should augment then punishment for resisting arrest as it seems to be potentially life threatening for all of society. You admit you have never arrest anyone yet you continue to make demands. It would seem that you are an ignorant entitled person.
  7. 10 Dec '14 20:26
    Originally posted by quackquack
    Perhaps its not as easy as you think to deal with large people who are committing crime and then resist arrest. Maybe we should augment then punishment for resisting arrest as it seems to be potentially life threatening for all of society. You admit you have never arrest anyone yet you continue to make demands. It would seem that you are an ignorant entitled person.
    so according to you, police officers killing suspects can only be judged by other police officers.

    it's frightening to see logic raped in such a manner by you and others who use this argument.

    you keep saying that only cops can judge other cops while praising grand juries composed of anything but cops for their judgement to not indict.
  8. 10 Dec '14 20:32
    Originally posted by quackquack
    Perhaps its not as easy as you think to deal with large people who are committing crime and then resist arrest. Maybe we should augment then punishment for resisting arrest as it seems to be potentially life threatening for all of society. You admit you have never arrest anyone yet you continue to make demands. It would seem that you are an ignorant entitled person.
    "Perhaps its not as easy as you think to deal with large people who are committing crime and then resist arrest."
    of course it's not easy. i never said otherwise. it's hard. it's a level of hard i won't do.

    THAT is why my taxes and your taxes pay someone else to do it. i don't force cops into service. they are not slaves. they, just like everyone else, are paid to do a job. and just because it's hard, they don't get to say "ooops" when killing someone.
  9. 10 Dec '14 23:46
    Originally posted by caissad4
    At 14 years old I was attacked by a drunk with a shotgun in Boston. I still carry a scar on my temple from that. At 17 I was robbed at gunpoint on a bus in New Orleans. At 18 I was held at gunpoint on a Pensacola street while 2 carloads of men switched cars (with each other, I was walking). Five years ago I was robbed at gunpoint at the hotel I work at. I k ...[text shortened]... the hotel and make sure they know that they are welcome to get coffee and/or use the restrooms.
    I guess I was wrong about lack of personal experience. Sorry for that, but you still exhibit more empathy toward cops than many who just don't understand the danger they face every day, as surrogates for us.
  10. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    11 Dec '14 01:24
    Originally posted by Zahlanzi
    no, one doesn't.


    i don't have to fly a plane once or twice to demand my pilot not be incompetent.
    i don't have to work in constructions just to have the right to demand my house, the house i paid people to build, doesn't collapse on my head.


    cops are paid to serve and protect. cops are paid to apprehend criminals, not execute them. i don't have ...[text shortened]... ng here is preposterous. let's have only cops judging cops, that's what's fair according to you.
    If you want the cops to be held to these higher standards then you should not object that they take enough of your tax money to pay them well enough for what they do. There should be no need for a police officer to need to take a second job in security to support his family in style.