Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 17 Jan '15 17:20
    "Americans who live abroad — more than six million of us worldwide (not counting those who work for the U.S. government) — often face hard questions about our country from people we live among. Europeans, Asians, and Africans ask us to explain everything that baffles them about the increasingly odd and troubling conduct of the United States. Polite people, normally reluctant to risk offending a guest, complain that America’s trigger-happiness, cutthroat free-marketeering, and “exceptionality” have gone on for too long to be considered just an adolescent phase. Which means that we Americans abroad are regularly asked to account for the behavior of our rebranded “homeland,” now conspicuously in decline and increasingly out of step with the rest of the world."

    http://www.salon.com/2015/01/13/have_americans_gone_crazy_partner/
  2. 17 Jan '15 18:36
    Why should the US be in lock step with the world?

    A simple response to why the US policy is so stupid, just look at the President.
  3. 17 Jan '15 18:50
    Originally posted by Eladar
    Why should the US be in lock step with the world?

    A simple response to why the US policy is so stupid, just look at the President.
    Simple responses are always welcome here.
  4. 17 Jan '15 23:34 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by JS357
    "Americans who live abroad — more than six million of us worldwide (not counting those who work for the U.S. government) — often face hard questions about our country from people we live among. Europeans, Asians, and Africans ask us to explain everything that baffles them about the increasingly odd and troubling conduct of the United States. Polite people, no ...[text shortened]... th the rest of the world."

    http://www.salon.com/2015/01/13/have_americans_gone_crazy_partner/
    So let me get this straight, a Muslim just killed a bunch of people for drawing cartoons in France, Belgium just stopped a killing spree by some Islamic militants, in Saudi Arabia and other Islamic countries women are without rights of any kind, and Americans are the crazy ones?

    Sounds like Americans need to stock up on ammo.
  5. 18 Jan '15 02:02
    Originally posted by whodey
    So let me get this straight, a Muslim just killed a bunch of people for drawing cartoons in France, Belgium just stopped a killing spree by some Islamic militants, in Saudi Arabia and other Islamic countries women are without rights of any kind, and Americans are the crazy ones?

    Sounds like Americans need to stock up on ammo.
    To people who have been raised in a government dominated societies that have been taught that traditional Christian beliefs are to be laughed at, it is only logical that they'd think that those who hold to Christian beliefs are crazy.

    What makes the US different is that we still have some sort of freedom when it comes to educating our young. Soon enough the US will be more like Europe with better brainwashed masses who are happy to live on the government's Manor.
  6. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    18 Jan '15 03:14
    Originally posted by JS357
    "Americans who live abroad — more than six million of us worldwide (not counting those who work for the U.S. government) — often face hard questions about our country from people we live among. Europeans, Asians, and Africans ask us to explain everything that baffles them about the increasingly odd and troubling conduct of the United States. Polite people, no ...[text shortened]... th the rest of the world."

    http://www.salon.com/2015/01/13/have_americans_gone_crazy_partner/
    Finger wagging and talk of "adolescent phases" by people who live in countries that probably have problems as serious as those faced by and in the United States are amusing, but not worth a response. But, that said, to humor the none-too-polite people referenced:

    The cowboy culture has always been a part of the US. Would I like to see a little more gun control in some areas? Sure. Is it a major problem that affects most Americans? Not really. Free marketeering? Sorry. no apology. Aside from the fact that taxation and social spending is pretty extensive in the US, government regulation of business, while perhaps not what it should be, is hardly inconsequential.

    The exceptionalism thing does embarrass me a little. I won't gainsay that. It's political baby-kissing. I doubt it had much impact on actual policy.
  7. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    18 Jan '15 03:29
    Gone crazy?
  8. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    18 Jan '15 04:17
    Originally posted by sh76
    Would I like to see a little more gun control in some areas? Sure. Is it a major problem that affects most Americans? Not really.
    11,100 firearm-related homicides in the USA in 2011?

    Sure, it's not heart disease... but at the same time, it's no wonder that international criticisms target a culture that watches the Newtown, CT, massacre and collectively shrugs.
  9. Subscriber Kewpie
    since 1-Feb-07
    18 Jan '15 04:17 / 2 edits
    From further down in the same article, which was written by an expat American citizen:

    " ...Then recently, I traveled back to the “homeland.” It struck me there that most Americans have no idea just how strange we now seem to much of the world. In my experience, foreign observers are far better informed about us than the average American is about them. This is partly because the “news” in the American media is so parochial and so limited in its views both of how we act and how other countries think — even countries with which we were recently, are currently, or threaten soon to be at war. America’s belligerence alone, not to mention its financial acrobatics, compels the rest of the world to keep close track of us. Who knows, after all, what conflict the Americans may drag you into next, as target or reluctant ally?"

    In a current thread in the General Forum, some Californian complains:
    "Is there a way to see how many players are on-line at any given time? And from which countries? It is my impression that many players are NOT from the West Coast...."

    Does he even know there are people in the world who don't live in the US? We see this so often everywhere we look - if it isn't in America, it's not worth considering.

    Most of us out here don't blame it on Obama, the perceived problems date back to GWB or even further.
  10. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    18 Jan '15 13:00
    Originally posted by wittywonka
    11,100 firearm-related homicides in the USA in 2011?

    Sure, it's not heart disease... but at the same time, it's no wonder that international criticisms target a culture that watches the Newtown, CT, massacre and collectively shrugs.
    11,100 in a vacuum means nothing. How many of those could have been prevented by tougher gun control laws?
  11. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    18 Jan '15 13:06 / 5 edits
    Originally posted by Kewpie
    From further down in the same article, which was written by an expat American citizen:

    " ...Then recently, I traveled back to the “homeland.” It struck me there that most Americans have no idea just how strange we now seem to much of the world. In my experience, foreign observers are far better informed about us than the average American is about them. Th ...[text shortened]... of us out here don't blame it on Obama, the perceived problems date back to GWB or even further.
    Of course it's true that American media covers other countries less than other countries' media tends to cover the US. That's what happens when, for better or for worse, your policies set the tone for the world in this era. For better or for worse, the performance of the American economy and American foreign policy decisions have a greater effect on the world than do those of any other country. That's not a brag - it may not even be a good thing - but it's a plain fact.

    Frankly, if Americans would say some of the crap in that article about other countries, we'd correctly be accused of xenophobia, ignorance and possibly racism, depending on the target country. The US is a big place. There are 315 million people give or take. Painting us with that sort of broad brush is, to put it charitably, just plain daft.

    From the article: ===next to no social welfare system===

    What incredible ignorance!



    Research Medicaid, TANF, food stamps, earned income tax credit, WIC, CHIP, Section 8, Title IV, SSI, SSD, CCFP, home energy assistance, etc., plus all the state programs and then come back and tell us that the US has "next to no social welfare system."
  12. 18 Jan '15 13:18
    Originally posted by sh76
    Of course it's true that American media covers other countries less than other countries' media tends to cover the US. That's what happens when, for better or for worse, your policies set the tone for the world in this era. For better or for worse, the performance of the American economy and American foreign policy decisions have a greater effect on the world t ...[text shortened]... tate programs and then come back and tell us that the US has "next to no social welfare system."
    Of course it is an exaggeration, but I don't think many will dispute that the US has a very weak social welfare system compared to comparably wealthy industrialized nations.
  13. 18 Jan '15 13:30
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Of course it is an exaggeration, but I don't think many will dispute that the US has a very weak social welfare system compared to comparably wealthy industrialized nations.
    http://www.cnsnews.com/commentary/terence-p-jeffrey/354-percent-109631000-welfare
  14. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    18 Jan '15 13:39
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Of course it is an exaggeration, but I don't think many will dispute that the US has a very weak social welfare system compared to comparably wealthy industrialized nations.
    Point me to the details of the welfare systems of three countries that make up a representative sample of such countries and I'll make my own judgment.
  15. 18 Jan '15 14:13
    Originally posted by sh76
    Point me to the details of the welfare systems of three countries that make up a representative sample of such countries and I'll make my own judgment.
    If you're curious, Google is your friend. If you have a specific query I might be able to assist you. Things like indefinite unemployment benefits, universal health care, subsidized housing and heavily subsidized tertiary education are pretty common, but unavailable, inadequate or less accessible to those on US welfare.