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  1. 31 Aug '14 19:16 / 1 edit
    http://reclaimdemocracy.org/corporate-accountability-history-corporations-us/

    Corporations provide the money to keep people like "W" and Obama in power. Get to know it.

    Corporations are the engines of collectivism.
  2. 31 Aug '14 19:17
    For 100 years after the American Revolution, legislators maintained tight control of the corporate chartering process. Because of widespread public opposition, early legislators granted very few corporate charters, and only after debate. Citizens governed corporations by detailing operating conditions not just in charters but also in state constitutions and state laws. Incorporated businesses were prohibited from taking any action that legislators did not specifically allow.

    States also limited corporate charters to a set number of years. Unless a legislature renewed an expiring charter, the corporation was dissolved and its assets were divided among shareholders. Citizen authority clauses limited capitalization, debts, land holdings, and sometimes, even profits. They required a company’s accounting books to be turned over to a legislature upon request. The power of large shareholders was limited by scaled voting, so that large and small investors had equal voting rights. Interlocking directorates were outlawed. Shareholders had the right to remove directors at will.


    In 1819 the U.S. Supreme Court tried to strip states of this sovereign right by overruling a lower court’s decision that allowed New Hampshire to revoke a charter granted to Dartmouth College by King George III. The Court claimed that since the charter contained no revocation clause, it could not be withdrawn. The Supreme Court’s attack on state sovereignty outraged citizens. Laws were written or re-written and new state constitutional amendments passed to circumvent the (Dartmouth College v Woodward) ruling. Over several decades starting in 1844, nineteen states amended their constitutions to make corporate charters subject to alteration or revocation by their legislatures. As late as 1855 it seemed that the Supreme Court had gotten the people’s message when in Dodge v. Woolsey it reaffirmed state’s powers over “artificial bodies.”
    But the men running corporations pressed on. Contests over charter were battles to control labor, resources, community rights, and political sovereignty. More and more frequently, corporations were abusing their charters to become conglomerates and trusts. They converted the nation’s resources and treasures into private fortunes, creating factory systems and company towns. Political power began flowing to absentee owners, rather than community-rooted enterprises.


    The industrial age forced a nation of farmers to become wage earners, and they became fearful of unemployment–a new fear that corporations quickly learned to exploit. Company towns arose. and blacklists of labor organizers and workers who spoke up for their rights became common. When workers began to organize, industrialists and bankers hired private armies to keep them in line. They bought newspapers to paint businessmen as heroes and shape public opinion. Corporations bought state legislators, then announced legislators were corrupt and said that they used too much of the public’s resources to scrutinize every charter application and corporate operation.
    Government spending during the Civil War brought these corporations fantastic wealth. Corporate executives paid “borers” to infest Congress and state capitals, bribing elected and appointed officials alike. They pried loose an avalanche of government financial largesse. During this time, legislators were persuaded to give corporations limited liability, decreased citizen authority over them, and extended durations of charters.
    Attempts were made to keep strong charter laws in place, but with the courts applying legal doctrines that made protection of corporations and corporate property the center of constitutional law, citizen sovereignty was undermined. As corporations grew stronger, government and the courts became easier prey. They freely reinterpreted the U.S. Constitution and transformed common law doctrines.
    One of the most severe blows to citizen authority arose out of the 1886 Supreme Court case of Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad. Though the court did not make a ruling on the question of “corporate personhood,” thanks to misleading notes of a clerk, the decision subsequently was used as precedent to hold that a corporation was a “natural person.” This story was detailed in “The Theft of Human Rights,” a chapter in Thom Hartmann’s recommended book Unequal Protection.
    From that point on, the 14th Amendment, enacted to protect rights of freed slaves, was used routinely to grant corporations constitutional “personhood.” Justices have since struck down hundreds of local, state and federal laws enacted to protect people from corporate harm based on this illegitimate premise. Armed with these “rights,” corporations increased control over resources, jobs, commerce, politicians, even judges and the law.
    A United States Congressional committee concluded in 1941, “The principal instrument of the concentration of economic power and wealth has been the corporate charter with unlimited power….”
  3. Standard member finnegan
    GENS UNA SUMUS
    31 Aug '14 19:43
    Originally posted by whodey
    For 100 years after the American Revolution, legislators maintained tight control of the corporate chartering process. Because of widespread public opposition, early legislators granted very few corporate charters, and only after debate. Citizens governed corporations by detailing operating conditions not just in charters but also in state constitutions and s ...[text shortened]... oncentration of economic power and wealth has been the corporate charter with unlimited power….”
    Follow this theme on through to free trade agreements, which the (corporate controlled) US is pushing on so many other countries, and which have as a key feature the capacity of corporations to take on elected governments through the courts and effectively prevent governments pursuing policies that harm their profits.

    So many examples. An obvious recent decision was the New York court backing vulture funds against the Argentinian government.
  4. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    01 Sep '14 02:39 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    For 100 years after the American Revolution, legislators maintained tight control of the corporate chartering process. Because of widespread public opposition, early legislators granted very few corporate charters, and only after debate. Citizens governed corporations by detailing operating conditions not just in charters but also in state constitutions and s ...[text shortened]... oncentration of economic power and wealth has been the corporate charter with unlimited power….”
    This may be true enough, but America's corporations have now become so wealthy and powerful, they can purchase nearly everything they need to perpetuate their dominant position over this country, except the power of the vote, and can even influence many voters since there are lot's of (less than intellegent) folks out there who would rather "owe their soul to the company store" rather than upset the status quo, since any change is scary to these people. I fear America has past the point of no return in curbing the power of these institutions.
  5. 01 Sep '14 02:51
    Originally posted by bill718
    This may be true enough, but America's corporations have now become so wealthy and powerful, they can purchase nearly everything they need to perpetuate their dominant position over this country, except the power of the vote, and can even influence many voters since there are lot's of (less than intellegent) folks out there who would rather "owe their soul t ...[text shortened]... e. I fear America has past the point of no return in curbing the power of these institutions.
    This is largely due to the power of the Federal Reserve system to loan money that doesn't exist to promote corporate growth.

    Major US corporations are largely debt zombies which at a whim can be bought or sold on credit, with money issued by the Fed.
  6. 01 Sep '14 02:58
    Originally posted by bill718
    This may be true enough, but America's corporations have now become so wealthy and powerful, they can purchase nearly everything they need to perpetuate their dominant position over this country, except the power of the vote, and can even influence many voters since there are lot's of (less than intellegent) folks out there who would rather "owe their soul t ...[text shortened]... e. I fear America has past the point of no return in curbing the power of these institutions.
    Many of these folks should have gone bust during the credit crisis.

    Instead, they all face a 70% increase in salary every year while the rest of the 99% fall into an abyss.
  7. 01 Sep '14 03:00
    Originally posted by finnegan
    Follow this theme on through to free trade agreements, which the (corporate controlled) US is pushing on so many other countries, and which have as a key feature the capacity of corporations to take on elected governments through the courts and effectively prevent governments pursuing policies that harm their profits.

    So many examples. An obvious recent decision was the New York court backing vulture funds against the Argentinian government.
    The court system has become a rubber stamp of world corporations.

    States need to resume the authority over corporations, not the courts.
  8. 01 Sep '14 03:08
    Has anyone ever heard of serco?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YBWxhm7mfY

    Yep, they control just about everything.

    Scary stuff.
  9. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    01 Sep '14 04:51
    Originally posted by whodey
    Has anyone ever heard of serco?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YBWxhm7mfY

    Yep, they control just about everything.

    Scary stuff.
    Serco is one of the contractors hired by United States Department of Health and Human Services to work on the HealthCare.gov web site
  10. 03 Sep '14 00:00
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Serco is one of the contractors hired by United States Department of Health and Human Services to work on the HealthCare.gov web site
    Now there is a shocker. I thought they ran everything EXCEPT that site.

    Mwhahaha!!
  11. 03 Sep '14 00:56
    Here is a very interesting video about the East India Company.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=naBmYqtvs2U

    It turns out, they were once the most powerful corporation in the world, and helped conquer India for the British crown. They are also known for the monopoly on tea in the mid 1700's that sparked the Boston Tea Party.

    What many probably don't know was, the tax on tea actually went down. The rebellion stemmed from the monopoly on tea as well as the fact they were being taxed without representation.

    Last I checked, Americans are now subject to corporate health care taxes whom are not electable.

    I like what Thomas Paine was said in Common Sense.

    "There is something absurd in supposing a continent to be perpetually governed by an island"


    ......or District."
  12. 03 Sep '14 02:20
    Originally posted by whodey
    Here is a very interesting video about the East India Company.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=naBmYqtvs2U

    It turns out, they were once the most powerful corporation in the world, and helped conquer India for the British crown. They are also known for the monopoly on tea in the mid 1700's that sparked the Boston Tea Party.

    What many probably don't kn ...[text shortened]... bsurd in supposing a continent to be perpetually governed by an island"


    ......or District."
    I almost forgot to mention, the British crown bailed out the East India company because it was too big to fail.

    LMAO!