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  1. 29 Jul '10 22:25
    On the bright side at least the Taliban now knows to be more careful about what they say over open airways, inside information about our search efforts and some of what we already know. Not to mention which signals we've been keying in on.

    http://www.armytimes.com/news/2010/07/ap_wikileaks_bergdahl_search_072910/

    Documents detail search for captive soldier


    By John Miller - The Associated Press
    Posted : Thursday Jul 29, 2010 14:19:38 EDT

    BOISE, Idaho — In the minutes after Pfc. Bowe Bergdahl was reported missing last June, his U.S. Army comrades in southern Afghanistan began searching bunkers, latrines, vehicles, even Afghan National Police posts in a nearby settlement.

    About five hours later, search dogs were on the ground.

    Meanwhile, radio operators were already intercepting messages indicating the worst: One of their own was in enemy hands.

    These details are from leaked military documents about the war in Afghanistan that provide an unvarnished, eight-day window into the U.S. Army's hectic search for an Idaho soldier captured by the Taliban.

    Bergdahl, a 24-year-old from Hailey in central Idaho, has been a captive since June 30, 2009.

    Documents posted on the whistle-blower group WikiLeaks' website include transcripts of Afghan radio transmissions intercepted after Bergdahl went missing from his base in southern Afghanistan — as well as reports from U.S. soldiers about talks with village elders about a possible prisoner swap.

    The documents show Afghan tribal leaders assured U.S. officials Bergdahl was unharmed.

    "The elders were asked by the Taliban to (do) a trade between the U.S. and Taliban," a U.S. soldier said in a report dated July 2, 2009. "The Taliban terms are 15 of their Taliban brothers in U.S. jail and some money in exchange for Pvt. Bergdahl."

    Bergdahl's Taliban captors have released at least two videotapes of him, including one on Christmas Day showing him healthy but speaking critically about the U.S. military operation in Afghanistan.

    The latest documents indicate the Taliban almost immediately seized on Bergdahl's value as a propaganda tool.

    According to a transcript of what appears to be a radio transmission intercepted July 1, 2009 — the day after Bergdahl's capture — people aware he was being held hostage discussed what to do with him.

    In the translated transcript, one person says: "Look, they have all Americans ... helicopters, the planes are looking for him."

    Another replies: "I think he is a big shot. (That's) why they are looking for him."

    A third man says: "Can you guys make a video of him and announce it all over Afghanistan that we have one of the Americans?"

    The second man responds again: "We already have a video of him."

    Nearly three weeks later, a Taliban video of Bergdahl began circulating on the Internet. Media from across the nation then descended on Bergdahl's tiny hometown just south of the Idaho resort town Sun Valley, where his parents live in a modest home on a dirt road that leads into the mountains.

    Col. Tim Marsano, Idaho National Guard spokesman, on Wednesday alerted Bergdahl's family to media reports about the leaked documents. But Marsano declined to comment on still-classified military information.

    "Even though they are leaked, it doesn't change our responsibility to hold them as government secrets," he told the Associated Press.

    Bergdahl's parents, Bob and Jani Bergdahl, have declined to speak to the media.

    Reports of how Bergdahl landed in enemy hands are conflicting.

    On July 2, 2009, two U.S. officials said the soldier "just walked off" his base with three Afghans. On July 6, the Taliban claimed they'd captured a "drunken American soldier." Bergdahl said in a video he was taken captive when he lagged behind on patrol.

    The leaked information does little to resolve the matter.

    According to the documents, five hours after Bergdahl missed a morning roll call, U.S. soldiers in the area picked up a radio transmission indicating "an American soldier is talking and looking for someone who speaks English."

    The next day, another intercepted conversation appears to mock U.S. soldiers' efforts to find him. It claims an unarmed Bergdahl was captured during an attack on his post in Paktika province near the border with Pakistan in an area known to be a Taliban stronghold.

    On July 4, another report came in: "Missing U.S. soldier was last seen in a village. ... A bag was covering his head, and he was wearing dark khaki apparel." It said the soldier was being transported in a black Toyota Corolla, which was being escorted by three to five motorcycles.

    Major John Redfield, spokesman for the U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Fla., didn't immediately comment Wednesday on the documents' authenticity.
  2. 29 Jul '10 22:35
    Messed up the title and it won't let me edit. But you get the point.
  3. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    29 Jul '10 23:00
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    Messed up the title and it won't let me edit. But you get the point.
    I don't. Apparently you think the American people having more information about one of our POWs is a bad thing. I disagree.
  4. 29 Jul '10 23:10
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    I don't. Apparently you think the American people having more information about one of our POWs is a bad thing. I disagree.
    So in your eyes it should be made public which radio frequencies and cell phone numbers we've keyed in on?
  5. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    29 Jul '10 23:29 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    So in your eyes it should be made public which radio frequencies and cell phone numbers we've keyed in on?
    Where's it say that in the article?

    Somehow I doubt the Taliban is using the same cell phones now as they did last year; Verizon's deals aren't that good.
  6. 29 Jul '10 23:43 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Where's it say that in the article?

    Somehow I doubt the Taliban is using the same cell phones now as they did last year; Verizon's deals aren't that good.
    The conversations themselves are a clue. And actually I believe they're radio frequencies that were intercepted.

    "Somehow I doubt the Taliban is using the same cell phones now as they did last year; Verizon's deals aren't that good."

    LOL! OMG that was a good one! It's especially funny considering the guy they've been looking for has been missing for less than a month. That's how recent this is.

    Don't worry, no1. I don't expect you to admit at least some of the information Wikileaks posted is harmful to our troops. That would require you to actually be debating honestly.
  7. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    29 Jul '10 23:54 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    The conversations themselves are a clue. And actually I believe they're radio frequencies that were intercepted.

    "Somehow I doubt the Taliban is using the same cell phones now as they did last year; Verizon's deals aren't that good."

    LOL! OMG that was a good one! It's especially funny considering the guy they've been looking for has been mi ted is harmful to our troops. That would require you to actually be debating honestly.
    July 2009 was last month? I'll have to fix my calender to get it in line with StormTrooperTime.

    Your link: Bergdahl, a 24-year-old from Hailey in central Idaho, has been a captive since June 30, 2009.

    OOOPS!
  8. 30 Jul '10 00:00
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    July 2009 was last month? I'll have to fix my calender to get it in line with StormTrooperTime.

    Your link: Bergdahl, a 24-year-old from Hailey in central Idaho, has been a captive since June 30, 2009.

    OOOPS!
    OK, you got me on that one. I was confusing it with the recent case that's been in the news recently.

    Still, posting the operational details of our search efforts and which communications we were able to successfully siphon is very useful information.
  9. 30 Jul '10 00:02
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    OK, you got me on that one. I was confusing it with the recent case that's been in the news recently.

    Still, posting the operational details of our search efforts and which communications we were able to successfully siphon is very useful information.
    "The battlefield consequences of the release of these documents are potentially severe and dangerous for our troops, our allies and Afghan partners, and may well damage our relationships and reputation in that key part of the world," Gates said. "Intelligence sources and methods, as well as military tactics, techniques and procedures will become known to our adversaries."

    Which pretty much mirrors what I said. He's only the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of staff.

    Also, he's the guy who made a passionate plea to congress to end the discriminating practice of DADT. So feel free to slime him as a "liar" because it suits your argument at the moment.
  10. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    30 Jul '10 00:03 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    OK, you got me on that one. I was confusing it with the recent case that's been in the news recently.

    Still, posting the operational details of our search efforts and which communications we were able to successfully siphon is very useful information.
    I'm sure the Taliban were perfectly aware of the "operational details" of our ineffective search efforts. In fact, they seem to have had a good laugh about them i.e.

    The next day, another intercepted conversation appears to mock U.S. soldiers' efforts to find him.
  11. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    30 Jul '10 00:05
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    "The battlefield consequences of the release of these documents are potentially severe and dangerous for our troops, our allies and Afghan partners, and may well damage our relationships and reputation in that key part of the world," Gates said. "Intelligence sources and methods, as well as military tactics, techniques and procedures will become kn ...[text shortened]... ADT. So feel free to slime him as a "liar" because it suits your argument at the moment.
    It's not your day; Gates is Secretary of Defense, not Chairman of the Joint Chiefs.
  12. 30 Jul '10 00:18
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    It's not your day; Gates is Secretary of Defense, not Chairman of the Joint Chiefs.
    Wrong quote.

    Here's Admiral Mullen's quote

    "Mr. Assange can say whatever he likes about the greater good he thinks he and his source are doing, but the truth is they might already have on their hands the blood of some young soldier or that of an Afghan family,"

    The point still stands. So which is it? Does Admiral Mullen not know what he's talking about, or is he unwilling to go against the military establishment? Because, you know, the military establishment is all about repealing DADT.
  13. 30 Jul '10 00:19
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    On the bright side at least the Taliban now knows to be more careful about what they say over open airways, inside information about our search efforts and some of what we already know. Not to mention which signals we've been keying in on.

    http://www.armytimes.com/news/2010/07/ap_wikileaks_bergdahl_search_072910/

    Documents detail search for c ...[text shortened]... mediately comment Wednesday on the documents' authenticity.
    uh, why do you think the wikileaks people give a d--n?

    the negotiated redactions were probably just to keep themselves out of jail.
  14. 30 Jul '10 00:20
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    I'm sure the Taliban were perfectly aware of the "operational details" of our ineffective search efforts. In fact, they seem to have had a good laugh about them i.e.

    The next day, another intercepted conversation appears to mock U.S. soldiers' efforts to find him.
    The thing is, when it comes to military related things you're "sure" of a lot of things that turn out to be wrong. As I've pointed out repeatedly.
  15. 30 Jul '10 00:21
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    On the bright side at least the Taliban now knows to be more careful about what they say over open airways, inside information about our search efforts and some of what we already know. Not to mention which signals we've been keying in on.

    http://www.armytimes.com/news/2010/07/ap_wikileaks_bergdahl_search_072910/

    Documents detail search for c ...[text shortened]... mediately comment Wednesday on the documents' authenticity.
    if you Alert Moderator on your OP and ask them to please change the thread title, they'll probably do it. i've made similar requests before.