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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    24 Apr '11 05:18
    Hey folks,

    Now, I reckon it's due to 3 months of sleeplessness; however, I could just be stoopid.
    I'm reading through philosophy of the ages (various books which I combine to get to understand the nature of a priori, etc.) for the second time and I'm stumbling, fumbling and tripping over the same problem I had 15 years ago: Kant.

    So, yeah, in case you didn't get it (and if you didn't, then you probably ain't gonna be able to help me; so move along, there's nothin' to see here folks), the title is a pun...

    Now, I get the a priori / a posteriori thing; I get the whole analytic vs. synthentic thing. I just don't, on the other hand, understand the mingling of the two.

    So please help! Thank.

    What are a priori analytic and synthetic things?
    What are a posteriori analytic and synthetic things?

    Please don't point me towards Wiki, for I've been there and it still sounds like gobbly gook to me (is that racist? I wouldn't know).

    Cheers!
  2. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    24 Apr '11 08:38
    Hint: Dworkin.
  3. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    24 Apr '11 08:38
    I'd also recommend reading and absorbing the Gospel of Luke.
  4. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    24 Apr '11 11:58
    Originally posted by shavixmir
    What are a priori analytic and synthetic things?
    What are a posteriori analytic and synthetic things?
    A posteriori synthetic and a priori analytic are easy, right? Lots of overlap in the concepts.

    So Kant argued that a posteriori analytic was a contradiction, so that's easy too. You're left with what is an a priori synthetic proposition. So here it depends whether you think there is such a thing as a priori knowledge about the world. If you believe in, say, natural law theories of ethics, then you'd argue that humans are born with some a priori knowledge of certain moral propositions. "Genocide is wrong" would then be such an example. Note that the subject is not contained on the predicate, so it's synthetic. And it doesn't rely on experience, so it's a priori.

    I don't agree with Kant that there are truly a priori synthetic propositions, though.
  5. 24 Apr '11 15:28
    Worry about how you're going to get on when you're 60.
    Worry about the world your kids are going to inherit.
    But fretting over Kant?

    Jebus you must have a charmed life.
  6. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    24 Apr '11 15:30
    Originally posted by Sam The Sham
    Jebus you must have a charmed life.
    Feeling wistful about your own lack of charm, are you?
  7. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    24 Apr '11 19:08
    Originally posted by Palynka
    I don't agree with Kant that there are truly a priori synthetic propositions, though.
    Smell the Kant!