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  1. 20 Nov '15 23:07 / 1 edit
    US Republican (not to mention some Democratic) politicians evidently have
    been competing to incite as much fear and hatred of Arab Muslim refugees as possible.

    http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/nov/20/carson-trump-refugee-rhetoric-dog-whistle-politics

    "Carson and Trump's refugee rhetoric is a whole new breed of dog whistle politics"

    http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/nov/20/muslim-americans-outrage-donald-trump-ben-carson

    "'Beyond terrifying': Muslim Americans shocked by Trump and Carson quotes"

    So when might all Muslims in the USA be legally required to wear a green crescent
    just like all Jews in the Third Reich were legally required to wear a yellow star?

    The Muslim family of Ahmed Mohamed, a 14 year old schoolboy who was
    detained after bringing a self-made timing device to his American school,
    has decided to emigrate to Qatar. How more likely would it be that Ahmed
    Mohamed can have a promising future in Qatar rather than in the USA?
  2. 20 Nov '15 23:42
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    US Republican (not to mention some Democratic) politicians evidently have
    been competing to incite as much fear and hatred of Arab Muslim refugees as possible.

    http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/nov/20/carson-trump-refugee-rhetoric-dog-whistle-politics

    "Carson and Trump's refugee rhetoric is a whole new breed of dog whistle politics"

    http:// ...[text shortened]... ely would it be that Ahmed
    Mohamed can have a promising future in Qatar rather than in the USA?
    people are afraid
    politicians will milk it for what it's worth
    hopefully good people and reason will win out
  3. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    21 Nov '15 00:59 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    US Republican (not to mention some Democratic) politicians evidently have
    been competing to incite as much fear and hatred of Arab Muslim refugees as possible.

    http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/nov/20/carson-trump-refugee-rhetoric-dog-whistle-politics

    "Carson and Trump's refugee rhetoric is a whole new breed of dog whistle politics"

    http:// ...[text shortened]... ely would it be that Ahmed
    Mohamed can have a promising future in Qatar rather than in the USA?
    The lust for political power: It makes people say things they normally would not say.
  4. 21 Nov '15 01:16 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by bill718
    The lust for political power: It makes people say things they normally would not say.
    In the early 1930s, some well-educated German Jews convinced themselves that Hitler
    was *not* really as anti-Semitic as his political rhetoric indicated. There was a comforting
    hypothesis that Hitler's anti-Semitic rhetoric was motivated by political expediency, aimed
    to appeal to the least educated voters by making the Jews into a handy scapegoat.
    Indeed, there were some Jews who hoped that Hitler was a restraining or moderating
    influence upon his more overtly vulgar anti-Semitic followers.

    There was some expedient calculation in the anti-Semitism of Hitler and other prominent Nazis.
    Although only a small minority of all German Jews, some Jews were officially reclassified as
    'Aryan' (or of 'German blood' ) if they had exceptional abilities, had fought bravely for
    Germany in the First World War, or enjoyed the personal protection of a powerful Nazi.
    Hitler himself enjoyed the companionship of an Austrian princess (by marriage) who was half-Jewish.
    When some of his cronies said, "Mein Fuehrer, how can you enjoy being intimate with a Jewess?",
    Hitler ignored them. He was willing to overlook her Jewish heritage when he admired her as a woman.
    As I recall, Hermann Goering said that it seemed that nearly every German Jew could
    find non-Jewish German friends, if not relatives, who would attest that he or she was an
    exemplary German citizen and hence should be spared from the general anti-Jewish edicts.
  5. 21 Nov '15 01:37
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    US Republican (not to mention some Democratic) politicians evidently have
    been competing to incite as much fear and hatred of Arab Muslim refugees as possible.

    http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/nov/20/carson-trump-refugee-rhetoric-dog-whistle-politics

    "Carson and Trump's refugee rhetoric is a whole new breed of dog whistle politics"

    http:// ...[text shortened]... ely would it be that Ahmed
    Mohamed can have a promising future in Qatar rather than in the USA?
    Reasonable precautions are now being labeled as Islamophobia. France has had a pretty much open borders for Muslim immigrants, and for a long time, no consequences. Nations are sorting out how much openness is reasonable in view of the number of radicals that may be embedded within any group of Muslim refugees.
  6. 21 Nov '15 01:40
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    In the early 1930s, some well-educated German Jews convinced themselves that Hitler
    was *not* really as anti-Semitic as his political rhetoric indicated. There was a comforting
    hypothesis that Hitler's anti-Semitic rhetoric was motivated by political expediency, aimed
    to appeal to the least educated voters by making the Jews into a handy scapegoat.
    In ...[text shortened]... was an
    exemplary German citizen and hence should be spared from the general anti-Jewish edicts.
    During coitus hardly any male thinks much about the ethnicity of the woman he is linked with.
  7. 21 Nov '15 01:47
    Originally posted by normbenign
    During coitus hardly any male thinks much about the ethnicity of the woman he is linked with.
    The biographers of Stephanie von Hohenlohe (nee Richter), an Austrian princess of Jewish
    heritage, doubt that she ever slept with Hitler, though she had affairs with married men.

    "She is frequently summoned by (Hitler) who appreciates her intelligence and good advice.
    She is perhaps the only woman who can exercise any influence on him."
    --secret British intelligence report (MI6) in 1938
  8. 21 Nov '15 10:34
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    In the early 1930s, some well-educated German Jews convinced themselves that Hitler
    was *not* really as anti-Semitic as his political rhetoric indicated. There was a comforting
    hypothesis that Hitler's anti-Semitic rhetoric was motivated by political expediency, aimed
    to appeal to the least educated voters by making the Jews into a handy scapegoat.
    In ...[text shortened]... was an
    exemplary German citizen and hence should be spared from the general anti-Jewish edicts.
    What are you on about ffs.

    Your comparison of civilian German's attitude to Jews at that point in time, with with what's going on today with extremist Islam is risible in the extreme.
  9. 21 Nov '15 12:38
    Is it Islamophobia to be scared of a group of people who continually commit violent acts against your country or is it just natural and common sense?

    For example, one of the critiques against illegal immigration is the fact that violent Mexican gangs are coming across the border and also committing violent acts against US citizens. Are we then to turn a blind eye to such violent acts or should we seek to properly vet those who come to the US?
  10. 21 Nov '15 12:44 / 1 edit
    Incidentally, what exactly is Islamopobia Duchess?

    GRAMMER: It is the difference between knowing your poo and knowing you're poo.
  11. 21 Nov '15 16:40
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    The biographers of Stephanie von Hohenlohe (nee Richter), an Austrian princess of Jewish
    heritage, doubt that she ever slept with Hitler, though she had affairs with married men.

    "She is frequently summoned by (Hitler) who appreciates her intelligence and good advice.
    She is perhaps the only woman who can exercise any influence on him."
    --secret British intelligence report (MI6) in 1938
    Brains and beauty! What a combination.
  12. 21 Nov '15 16:45
    Originally posted by whodey
    Is it Islamophobia to be scared of a group of people who continually commit violent acts against your country or is it just natural and common sense?

    For example, one of the critiques against illegal immigration is the fact that violent Mexican gangs are coming across the border and also committing violent acts against US citizens. Are we then to turn a blind eye to such violent acts or should we seek to properly vet those who come to the US?
    Being careful not to import MS 13, of radical Islamists, is not a condemnation of all South or Central Americans, or of all Muslims. It is sorting out the dangerous from the rest, if it is possible.
  13. 21 Nov '15 16:49
    Originally posted by divegeester
    What are you on about ffs.

    Your comparison of civilian German's attitude to Jews at that point in time, with with what's going on today with extremist Islam is risible in the extreme.
    In what ways. Why don't you explain why the analogy is flawed?
  14. 21 Nov '15 17:10
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    In what ways. Why don't you explain why the analogy is flawed?
    There were no radical Jews in '30s Germany that were carrying out terrorist bombings in Germany or elsewhere.
  15. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    21 Nov '15 17:42
    Originally posted by normbenign
    There were no radical Jews in '30s Germany that were carrying out terrorist bombings in Germany or elsewhere.
    Not quite true: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Irgun_attacks