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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 21 Oct '10 14:18
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130712737&ps=cprs


    I watch Fox Sunday when I have the chance and I really like Juan. I think he's got his liberal slants, but I also think he is honest and has many good points. I think the real problem here is NPR. Anyone who is making contributions to the organization might want to reconsider. I think they received public funding and now I do not see how they can continue to receive funding. Here's why he got fired:

    Williams responded: "Look, Bill, I'm not a bigot. You know the kind of books I've written about the civil rights movement in this country. But when I get on the plane, I got to tell you, if I see people who are in Muslim garb and I think, you know, they are identifying themselves first and foremost as Muslims, I get worried. I get nervous."


    Make an honest statement about how you feel and you get fired by NPR.
  2. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    21 Oct '10 14:54 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Eladar
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130712737&ps=cprs


    I watch Fox Sunday when I have the chance and I really like Juan. I think he's got his liberal slants, but I also think he is honest and has many good points. I think the real problem here is NPR. Anyone who is making contributions to the organization might want to reconsider. I t t nervous."



    Make an honest statement about how you feel and you get fired by NPR.[/b]
    What it's say under Williams here? http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/10/21/juan-williams-fired-npr_n_770901.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+HP%2Fmedia+(Media+on+The+Huffington+Post)


    The O'Reilly Factor identified him as an "NPR News Political Analyst" thus giving the impression his loony paranoia was either endorsed by that organization or common among its employees. IF NPR doesn't want such views to be affiliated with their network (and they don't), then they are prudent to replace employees who spout such views on competing networks.
  3. 21 Oct '10 15:55
    NPR are free to fire their reporters, especially if they express bigoted views not ensorsed by NPR. Just like Fox News can, of course.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Wilson_%28reporter%29
  4. 21 Oct '10 16:01 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Eladar
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130712737&ps=cprs


    I watch Fox Sunday when I have the chance and I really like Juan. I think he's got his liberal slants, but I also think he is honest and has many good points. I think the real problem here is NPR. Anyone who is making contributions to the organization might want to reconsider. I t t nervous."



    Make an honest statement about how you feel and you get fired by NPR.[/b]
    The reality is that a lot of people probably feel nervous or anxious if they find themselves sitting next to someone who looks or acts in a way that is "foreign" or "different" -- and it should be okay for someone to talk about these feelings without being called a "bigot" or worse.

    The goal should be to get people to deal with these anxieties in ways that do not lead to discriminatory or hateful behaviors -- but if there's a taboo on ever discussing these feelings, it's not going to make those feelings go away. It's just going to make it more likely that people with those feelings will engage in intolerant behavior.
  5. 21 Oct '10 16:12 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Melanerpes
    The reality is that a lot of people probably feel nervous or anxious if they find themselves sitting next to someone who looks or acts in a way that is "foreign" or "different" -- and it should be okay for someone to talk about these feelings without being called a "bigot" or worse.

    The goal should be to get people to deal with these anxieties in ways make it more likely that people with those feelings will engage in intolerant behavior.
    So yeah, every time I see a post from this guy "Melanerpes" it make me feel queasy. There is just no telling what he may be plotting behind a psuedonym like that. I think people have every right to be worried about him. If his rights were restricted or infringed I'm sure it would only be for the good of the community. It is good that we can talk about these things in America and alert people to the danger that "Melanerpes" (if that is his name) might represent. Heck, it would be irresponsible of us to not speculate on the damage this guy might be planning. I suspect that there is a whole class of people just like him that we should keep an eye on. Police surveillance, wire-tapping, ip-tracing, warrant-less searches are just a few of the steps that should be undertaken to ferret out what may be lurking in your neighborhood. Keep an eye out for this guy "Melanerpes." If there is even a 1% chance that he involved in a plot against the public safety we should act.
  6. 21 Oct '10 16:13
    agreed...maybe we should hook up the person who did the firing to see if his/her heartbeat or respiration changes when in a similar situation too what Juan was discussing....if there is any change indicating that they might be uncomfortable ...then they should be fired as well.

    Political Correctness rules
  7. 21 Oct '10 16:17
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    NPR are free to fire their reporters, especially if they express bigoted views not ensorsed by NPR. Just like Fox News can, of course.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Wilson_%28reporter%29
    NPR receives public funding. If they did not receive public funding, then I'd agree with you. Make them a private business then they should have free reign to hire and fire whomever they wish. Since they receive public funding, they need to be held to a higher standard.

    Juan Williams, as a private citizen should have the right to express his own feelings. He was not on that show as an official representative of NPR. If he was, then perhaps he did have a responsiblity to give only the NPR official doctrine, but as a private citizen on the show during his free time he had no such responsibility.
  8. 21 Oct '10 16:22
    Originally posted by Eladar
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130712737&ps=cprs


    I watch Fox Sunday when I have the chance and I really like Juan. I think he's got his liberal slants, but I also think he is honest and has many good points. I think the real problem here is NPR. Anyone who is making contributions to the organization might want to reconsider. I t ...[text shortened]... t nervous."



    Make an honest statement about how you feel and you get fired by NPR.[/b]
    not the first time NPR has screwed up. do you really think this little problem will sink them?
  9. 21 Oct '10 16:27
    Originally posted by Eladar
    NPR receives public funding. If they did not receive public funding, then I'd agree with you. Make them a private business then they should have free reign to hire and fire whomever they wish. Since they receive public funding, they need to be held to a higher standard.

    Juan Williams, as a private citizen should have the right to express his own feeling ...[text shortened]... trine, but as a private citizen on the show during his free time he had no such responsibility.
    They have a board of directors made up of representatives of their member stations. They are a non-profit with only a small piece of their funding coming from the government. Executives that work for the corporation make day to day decisions (like who to hire and fire.) If there is a problem with this decision I'm sure the board can address it. Since they already have a system in place to run the corporation how do you propose that they give you executive power to make hire and fire decisions?
  10. 21 Oct '10 16:38
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    What it's say under Williams here? http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/10/21/juan-williams-fired-npr_n_770901.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+HP%2Fmedia+(Media+on+The+Huffington+Post)


    The O'Reilly Factor identified him as an "NPR News Political Analyst" thus giving the impression his loony paranoia was ei ...[text shortened]... t), then they are prudent to replace employees who spout such views on competing networks.
    Huffington Post? lol. Thats George Soros baby. Wait a minute so is NPR. Go figure!
  11. Subscriber Sleepyguy
    Reepy Rastardly Guy
    21 Oct '10 16:39
    NPR is obviously racist. Can't have a black man ruining their meme that "fear of others" is all due to hateful whites. Someone call the NAACP.
  12. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    21 Oct '10 16:40
    Originally posted by utherpendragon
    Huffington Post? lol. Thats George Soros baby. Wait a minute so is NPR. Go figure!
    Are you claiming that the photo still from the O'Reilly Factor showing the words "NPR News Political Analyst" under Williams is a fake? That was the only thing I was using that particular article for.
  13. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    21 Oct '10 16:42
    Originally posted by Eladar
    NPR receives public funding. If they did not receive public funding, then I'd agree with you. Make them a private business then they should have free reign to hire and fire whomever they wish. Since they receive public funding, they need to be held to a higher standard.

    Juan Williams, as a private citizen should have the right to express his own feeling ...[text shortened]... trine, but as a private citizen on the show during his free time he had no such responsibility.
    So any non-profit that receives any government funding decisions regarding the hiring and firing of employees should be scrutinized by the government using a "higher standard"?
  14. 21 Oct '10 16:43
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Are you claiming that the photo still from the O'Reilly Factor showing the words "NPR News Political Analyst" under Williams is a fake? That was the only thing I was using that particular article for.
    Not at all. It was accurate. I was scoffing at the "thus giving the impression his loony paranoia"part. Is that you saying that or the Huffington Post?
  15. 21 Oct '10 16:51
    Originally posted by TerrierJack
    They have a board of directors made up of representatives of their member stations. They are a non-profit with only a small piece of their funding coming from the government. Executives that work for the corporation make day to day decisions (like who to hire and fire.) If there is a problem with this decision I'm sure the board can address it. Since th ...[text shortened]... poration how do you propose that they give you executive power to make hire and fire decisions?
    If it is only a small portion of their budget I suppose they will not miss the government's money.