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  1. 30 Sep '17 10:28 / 1 edit
    http://dailycaller.com/2017/09/29/colin-kaepernick-donates-money-to-charity-honoring-convicted-cop-killer/

    Colin Kaepernick donated $25,000 to a foundation honoring a convicted cop killer.

    The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback donated the money to the foundation Assata’s Daughter’s, according to The Daily Mail.

    They reported in part:


    Colin Kaepernick’s $25,000 donation to a charitable group honoring a convicted cop killer has been revealed.

    Kaepernick’s foundation made the donation to Chicago-based Assata’s Daughter’s, named after former Black Liberation Army member Assata Shakur, in April as part of a $1million charitable pledge.

    Shakur was convicted of first-degree murder in the 1973 shooting death of New Jersey state trooper Werner Foerster and sentenced to life in prison, but staged a daring jailbreak and now lives as a fugitive in Cuba.

    There is next to no chance an NFL team will ever sign Kaepernick after this revelation. He was already radioactive among the fanbase because of his national anthem protests, and donating to the foundation that honors a convicted cop killer is not going to help his reputation.
  2. 30 Sep '17 11:12
    Shocking. Please keep us up-to-date about the daily lives of people who throw balls for a living.
  3. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    30 Sep '17 11:31
    Originally posted by @whodey
    http://dailycaller.com/2017/09/29/colin-kaepernick-donates-money-to-charity-honoring-convicted-cop-killer/

    Colin Kaepernick donated $25,000 to a foundation honoring a convicted cop killer.

    The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback donated the money to the foundation Assata’s Daughter’s, according to The Daily Mail.

    They reported in part:


    Colin ...[text shortened]... nating to the foundation that honors a convicted cop killer is not going to help his reputation.
    You support the denial of employment based on what charities and/or political organizations a person contributes to?
  4. 30 Sep '17 11:36
    Originally posted by @no1marauder
    You support the denial of employment based on what charities and/or political organizations a person contributes to?
    I oppose glorifying those who assassinate law enforcement.

    It kinda reminds me of children in Palestine who are sent out into the streets by their parents to blow themselves up so that their parents are cut a check for their trouble.
  5. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    30 Sep '17 11:41 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @whodey
    I oppose glorifying those who assassinate law enforcement.

    It kinda reminds me of children in Palestine who are sent out into the streets by their parents to blow themselves up so that their parents are cut a check for their trouble.
    Why don't you answer my question?

    Your constant weaseling and evasions are tiresome.
  6. Standard member vivify
    rain
    30 Sep '17 12:45
    Kaepernick is completely wrong. Assata Shakur is a completely indefensible person. Kaepernick not only gave to an organization that honors her violence, but tweeted in honor of her birthday.

    Kaepernick is completely wrong here. NFL players have have shown solidarity with police, even locking arms with officers on the field. His actions delegitimize recent NFL protests, and strengthen the claims of his critics.

    Police brutality against blacks is wrong, and is an epidemic. Violence is cops is equally wrong, and let's hope that never becomes a problem either.
  7. 30 Sep '17 13:14 / 1 edit
    I find it interesting that the typical people support known terrorists.

    Or at least the bad guys terrorists. They would probably argue good guys are terrorists too. Or perhaps no such thing as terrorists just criminals. So they support criminals.
  8. 30 Sep '17 13:24
    Originally posted by @no1marauder
    You support the denial of employment based on what charities and/or political organizations a person contributes to?
    yes
  9. Subscriber mchill
    cryptogram
    30 Sep '17 14:28
    Originally posted by @eladar
    I find it interesting that the typical people support known terrorists.

    Or at least the bad guys terrorists. They would probably argue good guys are terrorists too. Or perhaps no such thing as terrorists just criminals. So they support criminals.
    One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter.
  10. 30 Sep '17 14:37 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @mchill
    One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter.
    Yep, that's why I added the extra stuff with the edit.

    One man's criminal is another man's freedom fighter.
  11. 30 Sep '17 19:18 / 5 edits
    Originally posted by @vivify
    Kaepernick is completely wrong. Assata Shakur is a completely indefensible person. Kaepernick not only gave to an organization that honors her violence, but tweeted in honor of her birthday.

    Kaepernick is completely wrong here. NFL players have have shown solidarity with police, even locking arms with officers on the field. His actions delegitimize ...[text shortened]... pidemic. Violence is cops is equally wrong, and let's hope that never becomes a problem either.
    "Assata Shakur is a completely indefensible person."
    --Vivify (who evidently tends to buy mainstream US media narratives)

    Some people, including black Americans (such as Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza),
    white Americans (such as historian H Bruce Franklin), and non-Americans disagree with Vivify.

    There's controversy about the fairness of Assata Shakur's treatment in the US criminal justice system.
    Her supporters (including her defense lawyer William Kunstler and Angela Davis) contend
    that she was unfairly convicted on account of racism and political persecution (FBI's COINTELPRO).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COINTELPRO

    "COINTELPRO ... was a series of covert, and *often illegal*,[1][2] projects conducted by
    the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) aimed at surveilling, infiltrating,
    discrediting, and disrupting American political organizations."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assata_Shakur

    "Between 1973 and 1977, in New York and New Jersey, Shakur was indicted ten times,
    resulting in seven different criminal trials. Shakur was charged with two bank robberies,
    the kidnapping of a Brooklyn heroin dealer, the attempted murder of two Queens police
    officers stemming from a January 23, 1973 failed ambush, and eight other felonies
    related to the Turnpike shootout.[34][72] Of these trials, three resulted in acquittals,
    one in a hung jury, one in a change of venue, one in a mistrial due to pregnancy, and
    *one in a conviction*; three indictments were dismissed without trial."

    "The prosecution did not need to prove that Shakur fired the shots that killed either
    Trooper Foerster or Zayd Shakur: being an accomplice to murder carries an equivalent
    life sentence under New Jersey law."

    "Shakur was identified as a political prisoner as early as October 8, 1973 by Angela Davis,"

    "An international panel of seven jurists were invited by Hinds to tour a number of U.S. prisons,
    and concluded in a report filed with the United Nations Commission on Human Rights that
    the conditions of her solitary confinement were "totally unbefitting any prisoner".[175][127]
    Their investigation, which focused on alleged human rights abuses of political prisoners,
    cited Shakur as "one of the worst cases" of such abuses and including her in "a class of
    victims of FBI misconduct through the COINTELPRO strategy and other forms of illegal
    government conduct who as political activists have been selectively targeted for provocation,
    false arrests, entrapment, fabrication of evidence, and spurious criminal prosecutions."[57][176]
    Amnesty International, however, did not regard Shakur as a former political prisoner."

    The Black Liberation Army (BLA) succeeded in breaking Assata Shakur out of prison in 1979.
    For several years, evidently, she stayed concealed in the USA, despite the FBI's efforts to track her down.
    By 1984, she had escaped to Cuba, where she was granted political asylum.
    She has lauded Fidel Castro and the Communist government of Cuba.

    Assata Shakur has received significant, though far from universal, support among African Americans.

    "The National Conference of Black Lawyers and Mos Def are among the professional
    organizations and entertainers to support Assata Shakur."

    "In 2015, Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza writes: “When I use Assata’s powerful
    demand in my organizing work, I always begin by sharing where it comes from, sharing
    about Assata’s significance to the Black Liberation Movement, what its political purpose
    and message is, and why it’s important in our context."

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/commentary/ct-cuba-assata-shakur-fbi-america-obama-perspec-1230-20141229-story.html

    "Why Cuba will never send Assata Shakur to the U.S."
    --Achy Obejas (29 December 2014)

    "In May 2013, on the 40th anniversary of her arrest, Assata Shakur was suddenly and
    inexplicably named to the FBI's Most Wanted Terrorists list, with an award of up to $2 million
    for her capture. She was the first woman ever put on that list, but she gained that notorious
    promotion at a time when she was doing little that could be conceived of as criminal."

    "Aaron Ford, special agent in charge of the FBI's Newark office, said, "While living openly
    and freely in Cuba, she continues to maintain and promote her terrorist ideology.
    She provides anti-U.S.-government speeches, espousing the Black Liberation Army's
    message of revolution and terrorism."

    "In other words, even by FBI standards, Shakur was raised to terrorist level on pretty shaky grounds:
    for speaking and writing, usually protected activities. At the time, I speculated in an essay
    for WBEZ that Shakur's addition to the FBI list might have been a way to pressure Cuba
    to release U.S. Agency for International Development worker Alan Gross."

    "Both countries have inherent interests, ethical and not so ethical, in allowing Shakur to die of natural causes in Havana.
    The first is practical: If the U.S. makes a serious request for Shakur, Cuba will undoubtedly counter
    with a request of its own for Luis Posada Carriles. The 86-year-old, who has long ties to
    the CIA and its covert activities in Latin America, is now living out his old age in Miami.
    Among his crimes: He was convicted in Panama of the 1976 bombing of a Cuban airliner
    that killed 73 civilians. He has been suspected of planting bombs in Havana in 1997
    (including one that killed an Italian tourist). He was arrested in Panama for an attempt on
    Fidel Castro's life but pardoned by the U.S.-supported president of that country in 2004."

    "Cuba has long been a haven for African-Americans who've committed what might be
    interpreted as political crimes. Black Panthers such as Eldridge Cleaver, Huey Newton and
    Raymond Johnson all spent time in Cuba in the 1960s (not always happily). At one time
    it was speculated that as many as 90 African-Americans were living in Cuba under asylum."
  12. Standard member vivify
    rain
    30 Sep '17 20:43 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @mchill
    One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter.
    Unless that freedom fighter caused unprovoked violence and robbery like Assata, then that's just another man's terrorist.
  13. 30 Sep '17 22:04
    Originally posted by @vivify to Mchil
    Unless that freedom fighter caused unprovoked violence and robbery like Assata, then that's just another man's terrorist.
    "In 2015, Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza writes: “When I use Assata’s powerful
    demand in my organizing work, I always begin by sharing where it comes from, sharing
    about Assata’s significance to the Black Liberation Movement, what its political purpose
    and message is, and why it’s important in our context."
    --Wikipedia

    Given that a co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement has expressed support
    of Assata Shakur, will Vivify now protest by refusing to support Black Lives Matter?
  14. Standard member vivify
    rain
    01 Oct '17 16:39
    Originally posted by @whodey
    http://dailycaller.com/2017/09/29/colin-kaepernick-donates-money-to-charity-honoring-convicted-cop-killer/

    Colin Kaepernick donated $25,000 to a foundation honoring a convicted cop killer.

    The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback donated the money to the foundation Assata’s Daughter’s, according to The Daily Mail.

    They reported in part:


    Colin ...[text shortened]... nating to the foundation that honors a convicted cop killer is not going to help his reputation.
    It turns out I was wrong about Assata Shakur. Here's an article from Vice:

    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/dpww8q/assata-shakur-fbi-most-wanted-tshepo-mokoena-122

    I started reading more about her after finding out she was Tupac Shakur's aunt by marriage (interestingly enough, Tupac was also charged with shooting a cop, but those charges were dropped in light of abuse of power on the cop's part. Keep in mind this happened long before Tupac started glorifying violence, after he shot multiple times in an armed robbery).

    Assata may have been convicted killing an officer, but it seems that she may very well have been innocent. I also mentioned bank robberies, but those charges were never substantiated.

    I owe Kaepernick, and most of all, Assata, my sincerest apologies.

    Whodey, Assata is not a cop killer, not in the slightest.
  15. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    01 Oct '17 19:05
    Originally posted by @whodey
    http://dailycaller.com/2017/09/29/colin-kaepernick-donates-money-to-charity-honoring-convicted-cop-killer/

    Colin Kaepernick donated $25,000 to a foundation honoring a convicted cop killer.

    The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback donated the money to the foundation Assata’s Daughter’s, according to The Daily Mail.

    They reported in part:


    Colin ...[text shortened]... nating to the foundation that honors a convicted cop killer is not going to help his reputation.
    Now it makes perfect sense: he was sitting because you can't write checks standing up!
    Duh!