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  1. 12 Feb '16 17:42 / 2 edits
    http://www.redstate.com/diary/jasonahart/2013/06/19/gov-kasich-god-wants-ohio-to-expand-medicaid/

    Gov. Kasich said he recently told a state legislator, “I respect the fact that you believe in small government. I do too. I also happen to know that you’re a person of faith.”



    “Now, when you die and get to the, get to the, uh, to the meeting with St. Peter, he’s probably not gonna ask you much about what you did about keeping government small, but he’s going to ask you what you did for the poor,” Kasich said. “Better have a good answer.”

    Is religion mixed with politics politically correct here?
  2. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    12 Feb '16 17:54
    Originally posted by whodey
    http://www.redstate.com/diary/jasonahart/2013/06/19/gov-kasich-god-wants-ohio-to-expand-medicaid/

    Gov. Kasich said he recently told a state legislator, “I respect the fact that you believe in small government. I do too. I also happen to know that you’re a person of faith.”



    “Now, when you die and get to the, get to the, uh, to the meeting with St. P ...[text shortened]... said. “Better have a good answer.”

    Is religion mixed with politics politically correct here?
    Is your point here that Ohio should not expand medicaid?
  3. 12 Feb '16 19:00
    Originally posted by whodey
    http://www.redstate.com/diary/jasonahart/2013/06/19/gov-kasich-god-wants-ohio-to-expand-medicaid/

    Gov. Kasich said he recently told a state legislator, “I respect the fact that you believe in small government. I do too. I also happen to know that you’re a person of faith.”



    “Now, when you die and get to the, get to the, uh, to the meeting with St. P ...[text shortened]... said. “Better have a good answer.”

    Is religion mixed with politics politically correct here?
    I think a politician saying one should do "things for the poor" is absolutely politically incorrect for a Republican.
  4. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    12 Feb '16 19:00
    Originally posted by whodey
    http://www.redstate.com/diary/jasonahart/2013/06/19/gov-kasich-god-wants-ohio-to-expand-medicaid/

    Gov. Kasich said he recently told a state legislator, “I respect the fact that you believe in small government. I do too. I also happen to know that you’re a person of faith.”



    “Now, when you die and get to the, get to the, uh, to the meeting with St. P ...[text shortened]... said. “Better have a good answer.”

    Is religion mixed with politics politically correct here?
    You don't seem to have a problem with Ted Cruz invoking God to explain his victory in Iowa:

    Let me first of all say, to God be the glory

    http://www.christianpost.com/news/ted-cruz-quotes-scripture-thanks-god-iowa-caucus-156562/

    Why chastise Kasich for making a statement consistent with Jesus' teachings in Matthew 25?
  5. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    12 Feb '16 19:03
    BTW, the first South Carolina poll since Kasich's second place showing in New Hampshire has been released and it shows him jumping from 1 or 2 percent to 9 percent giving him a shot at catching Cruz and Rubio for 2nd there as well.http://www.realclearpolitics.com/epolls/2016/president/sc/south_carolina_republican_presidential_primary-4151.html
  6. 12 Feb '16 19:35
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Is your point here that Ohio should not expand medicaid?
    My point here is whether or not a public figure should pursue public policy based upon what they think Jesus would want them to do.
  7. 12 Feb '16 19:36
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    You don't seem to have a problem with Ted Cruz invoking God to explain his victory in Iowa:

    Let me first of all say, to God be the glory

    http://www.christianpost.com/news/ted-cruz-quotes-scripture-thanks-god-iowa-caucus-156562/

    Why chastise Kasich for making a statement consistent with Jesus' teachings in Matthew 25?
    There is a difference in crediting the Almighty with an election win verses instituting public policy based upon what they think God told them to do, or do you disagree?
  8. 12 Feb '16 19:38 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    I think a politician saying one should do "things for the poor" is absolutely politically incorrect for a Republican.
    Conservatives are mostly those who have faith in a higher power and it is they that make up most charitable contributions. They give more of their income and time to help the poor than those that are not of a faith.

    Atheists tend to sit on their arse and demand government force them to pay more taxes so they can take care of the poor for them.
  9. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    12 Feb '16 19:43
    Originally posted by whodey
    There is a difference in crediting the Almighty with an election win verses instituting public policy based upon what they think God told them to do, or do you disagree?
    You are being laughably disingenuous, if not outright hypocritical; you constantly insist on public policy being based on "morality" and derive your "morality" from religious precepts. But you complain about Kasich doing the same.

    If guilt shaming people who take the Biblical words of Jesus seriously works to get public policies that aid the poor, I don't see anything wrong with it.
  10. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    12 Feb '16 19:46
    Originally posted by whodey
    Conservatives are mostly those who have faith in a higher power and it is they that make up most charitable contributions. They give more of their income and time to help the poor than those that are not of a faith.

    Atheists tend to sit on their arse and demand government force them to pay more taxes so they can take care of the poor for them.
    That seems to be BS: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/james-peron/conservatives-charitable-giving_b_1835201.html
  11. 12 Feb '16 19:46 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    You are being laughably disingenuous, if not outright hypocritical; you constantly insist on public policy being based on "morality" and derive your "morality" from religious precepts. But you complain about Kasich doing the same.

    If guilt shaming people who take the Biblical words of Jesus seriously works to get public policies that aid the poor, I don't see anything wrong with it.
    What about saving the unborn? What about outlawing gay sex?
  12. 12 Feb '16 19:47
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    That seems to be BS: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/james-peron/conservatives-charitable-giving_b_1835201.html
    The Huffington post. LMAO!!
  13. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    12 Feb '16 19:50
    Originally posted by whodey
    What about saving the unborn? What about outlawing gay sex?
    What about them? Are you saying that people don't use religion to try to get such policies enacted?
  14. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    12 Feb '16 19:50
    Originally posted by whodey
    The Huffington post. LMAO!!
  15. 12 Feb '16 19:58 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    What about them? Are you saying that people don't use religion to try to get such policies enacted?
    https://philanthropy.com/article/Religious-Americans-Give-More/153973

    The more important religion is to a person, the more likely that person is to give to a charity of any kind, according to new research released today.

    Among Americans who claim a religious affiliation, the study said, 65 percent give to charity. Among those who do not identify a religious creed, 56 percent make charitable gifts.

    About 75 percent of people who frequently attend religious services gave to congregations, and 60 percent gave to religious charities or nonreligious ones. By comparison, fewer than half of people who said they didn’t attend faith services regularly supported any charity, even a even secular one.

    “If your goal is to connect with donors, it’s clear that one of the things that matters to them is their religious orientation,” says Shawn Landres, Jumpstart’s chief executive and a co-author of the report.

    The study of more than 4,800 American households, which covers members of five major religious denominations and people who are unaffiliated with any faith, was derived from two national surveys on giving compiled this year and analyzed by Jumpstart, a nonprofit research group, and researchers at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. The report used data from two surveys: the National Study of American Religious Giving and the National Study of American Jewish Giving.

    Among the findings:

    • Giving rates among black Protestants, evangelical Protestants, Jews, mainline Protestants—which include Episcopalians, members of the United Methodist Church, Presbyterians, and some Lutherans—and Roman Catholics were about the same. However, while roughly half of all members of the other faith groups contribute to religious congregations, only 37 percent of Jews did the same.

    • American households donated a median $375 to congregations, $150 to religiously identified nonprofits, and $250 to secular charities in 2012.

    • Black Protestants, followed by Roman Catholics and Jews, were the most likely to give out of the desire to help the needy.

    • The three most popular charitable causes for all households regardless of religious affiliation were, in descending order: basic social services, “combined purpose” organizations (like United Way), and health care.

    The study also looked at how much money went not only to congregations but also to charities with religious identities but secular missions. It shows that religious giving is sweeping: Forty-one percent of all charitable gifts from households last year went to congregations, while 32 percent went to other nonprofits with a religious identity and 27 percent went to secular charities. The results of that piece of the study have an 8 percent margin of error.