Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
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    2120
    26 Apr '18 20:212 edits
    There's no place like home, even if it's in the DPRK (North Korea).

    Not every 'defector' (some claim to have been misled or duped) from the
    DPRK lives as contentedly in the ROK (South Korea) as its propaganda claims.
    Apart from struggling to adapt to a very different way of life in the capitalist ROK,
    former North Koreans routinely encounter adverse discrimination rather
    than sympathy from native-born South Koreans. So some of them (a small minority)
    yearn to return to the DPRK. The ROK's government does its utmost to
    discourage or stop (to the point of putting people in prison) any disillusioned
    former North Koreans from returning of their own free will to the DPRK
    because that would go against the ROK's propaganda that life in the ROK
    must be clearly better for *everyone* than life in the DPRK.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/26/forever-strangers-the-north-korean-defectors-who-want-to-go-back

    'Forever strangers': the North Korean defectors who want to go back.
    Nearly 30,000 defectors live in South Korea, but not all are happy to have
    escaped the regime and hope a summit between leaders will help them go home."

    "From the moment Kim Ryon-hui set foot in Seoul she has had a singular goal
    that has defined every aspect her life: return to her home in North Korea...
    Kim has spent the past seven years trying to return to her daughter and
    husband in Pyongyang, staging protests, going on speaking tours and petitioning
    the United Nations, saying she is trapped, a stranger in a strange land."

    "Her saga began when she travelled to China for medical treatment in 2011,
    when she was shocked to discover the fellow Communist state did not provide
    free healthcare. She began working to pay her bills, when a broker who
    smuggles North Koreans to the South convinced her she could make
    more money there, and return in a few months.
    But when she arrived in the South she quickly realised it was a one-way ticket."

    "Kim planned to apply for a passport and return, but was rejected when
    the [ROK] authorities discovered her destination was Pyongyang.
    Kim then tried to forge a passport but was caught and sentenced to two years in prison."

    "No matter how affluent you are if you can’t share that with your family, it would be meaningless.”
    --Kim Ryon-hui

    Kim Ryon-hui's NOT a genuine defector. When she went to China for
    medical treatment, she never intended to leave the DPRK forever.
    She had a comparatively comfortable life in Pyongyang. She loves her
    husband and child, whom she has not seen for seven years. I believe
    that she's sincere in saying that she would be happier living with her family
    in the DPRK than living alone, even if she had more money, in the ROK.

    Given that she knows no 'secrets', the ROK cannot have a security objection
    to allowing her to return to the DPRK. As far as I can see, the only reason
    why the ROK's government's forcibly keeping a woman separated from her family
    in the DPRK is because allowing her to go home would undermine its propaganda.
    So the ROK's government supports the right of people in the DPRK to
    travel freely to live in the ROK, but not the other way around.

    I don't claim that the ROK's recent human rights record is as bad as the DPRK's.
    My point is that the ROK's not quite the model of freedom that it may claim.
    It's deeply hypocritical for the ROK to deny former North Koreans their right to return to the DPRK.
    Should family reunification depend upon what's politically expedient for a government?
  2. Joined
    11 Nov '14
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    16719
    26 Apr '18 20:311 edit
    Hello D64

    Sorry to butt in on this post, but I asked you a question a couple of days ago, and haven't had a reply. No doubt you have been busy, no problem.

    It is on the 'all America's white terrorism' thread, page 7 , I think 3 or 4 from the bottom.

    Thanks

    Bott
  3. Joined
    05 Nov '06
    Moves
    81331
    26 Apr '18 20:46
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    There's no place like home, even if it's in the DPRK (North Korea).

    Not every 'defector' (some claim to have been misled or duped) from the
    DPRK lives as contentedly in the ROK (South Korea) as its propaganda claims.
    Apart from struggling to adapt to a very different way of life in the capitalist ROK,
    former North Koreans routinely encounter adverse ...[text shortened]... deeply hypocritical for the ROK to deny former North Koreans their right to return to the DPRK.
    you thrive on racism and division. is your life so sad that you take joy in others misery?
  4. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
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    26 Apr '18 20:55
    Originally posted by @mott-the-hoople
    you thrive on racism and division. is your life so sad that you take joy in others misery?
    The white supremacist and racist troll Mott-the-Hoopie ignores the fact that racism is irrelevant
    in the issue of the ROK's government denying unhappy former North Koreans the right to
    return to live with their families (whom they love) in the DPRK.
  5. Joined
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    16719
    26 Apr '18 21:04
    Hi D64

    Are you choosing to contribute no more to the thread that I cited in post #2 on this page?

    Just a simple reply would be appreciated. Thanks
  6. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
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    2120
    26 Apr '18 21:151 edit
    Originally posted by @blood-on-the-tracks
    Hi D64

    Are you choosing to contribute no more to the thread that I cited in post #2 on this page?

    Just a simple reply would be appreciated. Thanks
    My choice of writing or not writing does NOT depend upon appeasing my dishonest trolls' nagging demands.
  7. Joined
    05 Nov '06
    Moves
    81331
    26 Apr '18 21:19
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    The white supremacist and racist troll Mott-the-Hoopie ignores the fact that racism is irrelevant
    in the issue of the ROK's government denying unhappy former North Koreans the right to
    return to live with their families (whom they love) in the DPRK.
    I sais racism AND division...you ducked one...try again
  8. Joined
    11 Nov '14
    Moves
    16719
    26 Apr '18 21:25
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    My choice of writing or not writing does NOT depend upon appeasing my trolls' nagging demands.
    Sorry.

    I asked a question, quite politely, on the thread referenced a few posts up.

    I was not aware that asking a question was *trolling*

    If *nagging* is politely asking that such a question is answered, then I hold my hand up to being a *nag*

    Maybe D64's 'choice of writing or not writing ' DOES depend on whether she/he has made a massive faut pas, and wants the whole thing to go away.

    Sadly, that ain't going to happening
  9. Behind the scenes
    Joined
    27 Jun '16
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    1407
    27 Apr '18 00:112 edits
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    There's no place like home, even if it's in the DPRK (North Korea).

    Not every 'defector' (some claim to have been misled or duped) from the
    DPRK lives as contentedly in the ROK (South Korea) as its propaganda claims.
    Apart from struggling to adapt to a very different way of life in the capitalist ROK,
    former North Koreans routinely encounter adverse ...[text shortened]... he DPRK.
    Should family reunification depend upon what's politically expedient for a government?
    I don't claim that the ROK's recent human rights record is as bad as the DPRK's. My point is that the ROK's not quite the model of freedom that it may claim.


    This is true Duchess, but what can I say? We live in an flawed world, and it's all the white man's fault! 😠
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