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Debates Forum

  1. Joined
    07 Dec '05
    Moves
    14732
    21 Jan '16 20:53
    Why did he stay in Iran after his release? I know it is his choice, but it does seem a little odd.
  2. Germany
    Joined
    27 Oct '08
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    3118
    21 Jan '16 21:24
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    Why did he stay in Iran after his release? I know it is his choice, but it does seem a little odd.
    Ask Nosratollah Khosravi-Roodsari.
  3. Subscriberno1marauder
    Humble and Kind
    In the Gazette
    Joined
    22 Jun '04
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    39949
    21 Jan '16 22:14
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    Why did he stay in Iran after his release? I know it is his choice, but it does seem a little odd.
    (shrug) The Iranians released by the US have decided to stay in the US AFAIK. Maybe they and he like it better there (except for the being in prison thingy).
  4. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
    Moves
    2120
    21 Jan '16 22:264 edits
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    Why did he stay in Iran after his release? I know it is his choice, but it does seem a little odd.
    After being released from Second World War internment camps, the overwhelming majority
    of Japanese-Americans preferred to stay in the United States, though some voluntarily
    (after losing their homes and jobs) decided to go to Japan and some were deported against their will.
    Many Japanese-Americans did not speak Japanese well, if at all, and they felt more
    at home even in a deeply racist United States than in a very foreign postwar Japan.

    In her memoir _Underground in Berlin_, Marie Simon (nee Jalowicz), a German Jew
    who survived the Holocaust by concealing her identity (with the help of German friends)
    mostly in Berlin explained why she decided to stay in Germany after the Second World War.
    She wrote that she had emigrated from the Germany of Hitler to the the Germany of Bach and Goethe.
    Despite everything that had happened to her, she still considered herself German and
    strongly identified with German culture. She wrote that she owed her life to many German
    friends who had helped her despite the risks to themselves. It's interesting that she
    decided to live in the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) because she
    believed that the Federal Republic (West Germany) was too cozy with former Nazis.

    During the fall of Berlin, Marie Jalowicz was 'naturally' (her term) raped for one night
    by a Soviet soldier, who had 'liberated' her. She accepted it as a modest price to pay.
    Afterward, he gave her a paper in Russian saying (falsely) that she was his fiancee
    and other Soviet soldiers should leave her alone because she was under his protection.
    Whenever other Soviet soldiers attempted to rape her, she showed them that paper,
    and they would stop. (She was fortunate in avoiding very drunken lusting soldiers.)
    Marie Jalowicz regarded her rape as a comparatively minor trauma, but the German
    friend who had saved her life by lending identity documents was much more traumatized
    when she was raped and impregnated by a Soviet soldier in the room next to hers.
    My point is that different people may respond differently to similar experiences.
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