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Debates Forum

  1. 11 Feb '13 12:26
    Will this set a precedent? Who is likely to be the next Pope?
  2. 11 Feb '13 13:34
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Will this set a precedent? Who is likely to be the next Pope?
    Doesn't he know that Popes don't resign?
  3. 11 Feb '13 13:56
    Originally posted by whodey
    Doesn't he know that Popes don't resign?
    If you petition the Vatican I'm sure he will reverse the decision.
  4. Subscriber kmax87
    You've got Kevin
    11 Feb '13 15:22 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    If you petition the Vatican I'm sure he will reverse the decision.
    The precedent's already been set. Twice, but not in recent history. The question is, what conservative faction/heir apparent does Benedict want to promote into power? Is the health concern legitimate or is he simply covering all bases by personally shepharding the keys across to the right candidate?
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    11 Feb '13 16:55
    Wow really? This one didn't last long.
  6. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    11 Feb '13 16:58
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Will this set a precedent? Who is likely to be the next Pope?
    I read somwhere he felt they should have elected a younger man.
  7. 11 Feb '13 20:12
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Who is likely to be the next Pope?
    I'll bet you $100 that it will be a white male even though there are some African cardinals who are considered to be in the running.
  8. 11 Feb '13 20:21
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Will this set a precedent? Who is likely to be the next Pope?
    No it won't. A Pope resigned in the year 1415.


    But I'm so happy there's no more pappy.
  9. 11 Feb '13 20:23
    Originally posted by johnnylongwoody
    No it won't. A Pope resigned in the year 1415.


    But I'm so happy there's no more pappy.
    I'm no scientist but my math tells me that was 600 years ago.

    Actually, I am a scientist.
  10. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    11 Feb '13 23:52
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Will this set a precedent? Who is likely to be the next Pope?
    Bill Clinton.
  11. 11 Feb '13 23:57
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    If you petition the Vatican I'm sure he will reverse the decision.
    Not a chance. He said he was resigning because of all the negative posts here at RHP in the spirituality forums.
  12. 11 Feb '13 23:58
    Originally posted by Zamboner
    I'll bet you $100 that it will be a white male even though there are some African cardinals who are considered to be in the running.
    Obama?
  13. 12 Feb '13 00:04
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Will this set a precedent? Who is likely to be the next Pope?
    How did his position become so completely lost, and with God on his side?
  14. 12 Feb '13 00:51
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Will this set a precedent? Who is likely to be the next Pope?
    "Will this set a precedent?"

    Probably no more than King Edward VIII's abdication 'set a precedent'.

    "Who is likely to be the next Pope?"

    Has Las Vegas set the odds yet?
  15. 12 Feb '13 10:10
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    "Will this set a precedent?"

    Probably no more than King Edward VIII's abdication 'set a precedent'.

    "Who is likely to be the next Pope?"

    Has Las Vegas set the odds yet?
    Edward VIII abdicated for very specific reasons, which were unlikely to be duplicated and which (by the moral standards of the time) were arguably disreputable. With this negative precedent, it's unlikely that a British monarch would abdicate, except in extreme circumstances.

    A closer comparison to what Benedict has done (resigning because of old age) is the abdication of Wilhelmina, Queen of the Netherlands, in 1948. That did set a precedent and her two successors have similarly abdicated.

    Actually, it may be that the reason no Pope has resigned for centuries is because previous abdications happened in dark circumstances or had negative consequences. Thus, when Celestine V "made the great refusal" (Dante's phrase) in 1294, he ushered in the reign of the notoriously corrupt Boniface VIII, while Gregory XII was humiliatingly obliged to abdicate in order to end the Western Schism. Those precedents had surrounded papal abdication with a aura of failure and menace. Now that Benedict's action has suggested that it's OK for a Pope to step down just because of age and failing health, I wouldn't be surprised if that became the norm.