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  1. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    28 Sep '09 16:33
    Two Honduran media organisations that have been critical of the country's interim government are raided by troops.

    Two Honduran media organisations that have been critical of the country's interim government have been closed.

    Troops raided Radio Globo and Cholusat Sur TV hours after authorities issued a state of emergency suspending key civil liberties for 45 days.

    Rest of the article here: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/low/americas/8279243.stm
  2. 28 Sep '09 17:29
    Originally posted by FMF
    [b]Two Honduran media organisations that have been critical of the country's interim government are raided by troops.

    Two Honduran media organisations that have been critical of the country's interim government have been closed.

    Troops raided Radio Globo and Cholusat Sur TV hours after authorities issued a state of emergency suspending key civil liber ...[text shortened]... es for 45 days.

    Rest of the article here: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/low/americas/8279243.stm[/b]
    They're screwing it up, that will only contribute to their unpopularity both abroad and in the country.

    I guess the best thing for them to do (in order to make sure zelaya doesn't return) is to kill him, but then again, that wouldn't be right.
  3. 29 Sep '09 01:40
    I agree, mistake in handing public relations, although zelaya pushed forward to create the constituional crisis, now zelaya has already hurt himself in many ways. the government should maintain open media channels. chavez and fidel would be proud of michelletti right about now, nobody else should be.
  4. 29 Sep '09 04:11
    Looks like Michelletti will not be a dictors (Chavez, on the other hand...)


    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125419336718548425.html

    "Interim Honduran President Roberto Micheletti said the government will lift an emergency decree limiting civil liberties just one day after issuing the measure, which ran into a firestorm of criticism.

    "We've come to ask the president of the republic, with all due respect, to declare that decree null and void," said José Alfredo Saavedra, the president of the Honduran congress, who was accompanied to a meeting with Mr. Micheletti by the heads of the congressional delegations of four out of Honduras's five political parties.

    The emergency decree, which was to last for 45 days, bans unauthorized gatherings and allows police to detain people without warrants, although they must then be turned over to civil courts. The decree also allows authorities to shut down news media issuing statements that imperil public order, among other things.

    Mr. Micheletti issued the decree Sunday after Mr. Zelaya, who has holed up in the Brazilian embassy since slipping back into Tegucigalpa last week, went on radio and television urging his followers to gather in the capital to begin the "final offensive" to bring him back to power. Only a few hundred supporters heeded that call. Mr. Zelaya on Monday addressed the United Nations General Assembly by cellphone, asking leaders to guarantee his safety and that of his supporters.

    On Monday, police raided the offices of a pro-Zelaya radio station as well as a pro-Zelaya television station that had broadcast Mr. Zelaya's call to action, knocking both off the air.

    The decree was also blasted by Honduran presidential candidates. In response, Mr. Micheletti said he will nullify the it "by the end of the week."
  5. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    29 Sep '09 04:11
    Originally posted by FMF
    Two Honduran media organisations that have been critical of the country's interim government have been closed.
    This seems to put what happened before into context.

    Democratically elected Mr Zelaya was forced from office and into foreign exile at gunpoint by the army (who then retrospectively got the prerequisite documents) after he announced plans to hold a non-binding public consultation on whether people supported moves to change the constitution. This constitution, we should remember, was written by the military dictatorship when it was in power in the early 80s.

    This travesty of a document, forced upon Honduras - essentially at gunpoint in 1982 - appears to have been designed to place the military above the law in perpetuity. "Reforming" the constitution is "treason". Holding a non-binding public consultation on whether people supported moves to discuss possible changes to the constitution is deemed to be "treason" and the army draws its weapons on the nation's president.

    And now the army has drawn its weapons on media outlets that have been critical of the players who have benefitted from the coup.

    True colours on show, I think.

    The 'pro-democracy' credibility of certain posters here at RHP has been sullied, without a doubt.
  6. 29 Sep '09 04:13
    Originally posted by FMF
    This seems to put what happened before into context.

    Democratically elected Mr Zelaya was forced from office and into foreign exile at gunpoint by the army (who then retrospectively got the prerequisite documents) after he announced plans to hold a non-binding public consultation on whether people supported moves to change the constitution. This constitution, ...[text shortened]... emocracy' credibility of certain posters here at RHP has been sullied, without a doubt.
    Cite your source, especially considering you identify yourself as a history professor...
  7. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    29 Sep '09 04:15
    Originally posted by eljefejesus
    Cite your source, especially considering you identify yourself as a history professor...
    I am not a history professor. And I've simply been following the story. Which bits of my summary do you think are controversial?
  8. 29 Sep '09 04:41
    Originally posted by FMF
    I am not a history professor. And I've simply been following the story. Which bits of my summary do you think are controversial?
    Then what was that comment about having graduate students and about teaching history??
  9. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    29 Sep '09 04:44
    Originally posted by eljefejesus
    Then what was that comment about having graduate students and about teaching history??
    I don't know. You're the one who's raising this. What are you on about?
  10. 29 Sep '09 04:44
    Originally posted by FMF
    This seems to put what happened before into context.

    Democratically elected Mr Zelaya was forced from office and into foreign exile at gunpoint by the army (who then retrospectively got the prerequisite documents) after he announced plans to hold a non-binding public consultation on whether people supported moves to change the constitution. This constitution, ...[text shortened]... emocracy' credibility of certain posters here at RHP has been sullied, without a doubt.
    Given that the post above yours shows that Michelleti's government has rescinded the emergency measures, the stupidity of certain pro-zelaya posters has been reinforced... without a doubt.
  11. 29 Sep '09 04:46 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FMF
    I don't know. You're the one who's raising this. What are you on about?
    You know full well the pattern of waffling that you're always getting called on, and yes, people notice that you always seem to be whatever is convenient for you at the time, whether through implication, half-truths, or suggestion.
  12. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    29 Sep '09 04:50
    Originally posted by eljefejesus
    Cite your source...
    Which bits of my summary do you think are controversial?
  13. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    29 Sep '09 04:51
    Originally posted by eljefejesus
    You know full well the pattern of waffling that you're always getting called on, and yes, people notice that you always seem to be whatever is convenient for you at the time, whether through implication, half-truths, or suggestion.
    What is this red herring of yours about me being a 'history professor'?
  14. 29 Sep '09 04:53
    Originally posted by FMF
    What is this red herring of yours about me being a 'history professor'?
    You implied it in the past and now you deny it.

    Do you claim to be any sort of professor whatsoever now? Perhaps it is just the type of professor that you accidentally suggested to be that is at issue.
  15. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    29 Sep '09 04:55
    Originally posted by eljefejesus
    Given that the post above yours shows that Michelleti's government has rescinded the emergency measures, the stupidity of certain pro-zelaya posters has been reinforced... without a doubt.
    Of course it's going to be rescinded. Who said it wouldn't be rescinded? What does the fact it will be rescinded have to do with the fact that the people who staged the coup have shown their true colours by sending in the army against a radio channel and a TV channel for being critical of the regime?

    The question is the true nature of Michelleti, his regime, and their backers in the military, not how long it took for his outrageous "emergency measures" to be rescinded.