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  1. 28 Jun '13 19:52 / 2 edits
    The President plays down importance of going after Snowden and labels Snowden as merely a "29-yr old hacker."

    Obama Seeks to Play Down Snowden’s Import

    President Obama sought Thursday to minimize the significance of a fugitive former national security contractor wanted for leaking government secrets, calling him a “29-year-old hacker” and suggesting that American frustration with China and Russia for apparently helping him evade extradition was not worth damaging relations with those countries.

    Mr. Obama’s remarks, his most extensive comments on the fugitive, Edward J. Snowden, came as new confusion swirled over Mr. Snowden’s ultimate destination, with Ecuador’s government saying it could not decide on his request for asylum unless he was in that country or one of its embassies elsewhere.

    Mr. Snowden, who turned 30 last week, has been ensconced out of sight at an international transit lounge in a Moscow airport since Sunday, when he arrived from Hong Kong despite an American effort to extradite him on criminal charges. There had been speculation that he would board a Havana-bound flight on Thursday, but he did not, raising the possibility that his legal limbo could stretch into weeks in his odyssey to reach a third country.

    Mr. Obama, speaking to reporters in Dakar, Senegal, at the start of a trip to Africa, said he had not personally called the presidents of China or Russia on the Snowden case because he did not want to elevate its importance. He said other nations should simply be willing to return Mr. Snowden to the United States as a matter of law enforcement.

    “This is something that routinely is dealt with,” Mr. Obama said. “This is not exceptional from a legal perspective. I’m not going to have one case suddenly being elevated to the point where I have to do wheeling and dealing and trading.”

    He rejected the suggestion that he might order the military to intercept any plane that might be carrying Mr. Snowden. “I’m not going to be scrambling jets to get a 29-year-old hacker,” Mr. Obama said.

    His remarks on Mr. Snowden’s case followed similarly toned-down language by his aides on the severity of the problem . . .

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/28/world/snowden.html#h[HroEit,1]
  2. 28 Jun '13 19:54
    Now you ignore it. Pretend it doesn't exist, the move on. It is the pretty much what Obama does with every problem he has. As long as he has the press in his hip pocket, the masses think there was nothing wrong to begin with!
  3. 28 Jun '13 19:57
    Reaction on Fox News

    Tucker Carlson Trashes Obama’s Approach To Snowden: ‘Most Arrogant Display…I’ve Ever Seen From’ Him

    Fox & Friends was not pleased with President Obama‘s handling of the Edward Snowden ordeal during Friday’s show when the crew revisited the remarks he made yesterday. Noting Obama’s unwillingness to be “scrambling jets” to get a “29-year-old hacker,” Tucker Carlson and Steve Doocy criticized Obama’s arrogance and waning international influence.

    During a press conference in Senegal yesterday, Obama said he hasn’t called President Xi or President Putin personally because “I shouldn’t have to.” Saying the U.S. would go after Snowden through regular channels, he added, “No, I’m not going to be scrambling jets to get a 29-year-old hacker.”

    “Wasn’t electing Obama supposed to make the rest of the world like us and respect us?” Carlson asked, noting Ecuador’s (where Snowden is seeking asylum) “contempt” toward the U.S.


    http://www.mediaite.com/tv/tucker-carlson-trashes-obamas-approach-to-snowden-most-arrogant-display-ive-ever-seen-from-him/
  4. Standard member vivify
    rain
    28 Jun '13 20:02
    Snowden is a moron. Was this really worth leaving his family and cushy lifestyle for? The general public gets bored fast, and moves on to the next topic. When this is old and no one cares about it anymore, Snowden will still be a fugitive who left his kid forever fatherless.

    Idiot.
  5. 28 Jun '13 20:10 / 1 edit
    In a different more general context, but another interesting article from GOPLifer.

    Snowden and the Security State

    Georgia’s Democratic Senator Max Cleland went into the 2002 election season with a 22-point lead on his Republican opponent, Saxby Chambliss. Cleland was a Vietnam vet who lost three limbs at the battle of Khe San, yet Chambliss attacked him for “breaking his oath to protect and defend the Constitution” by opposing the Patriot Act. After months of brazen attacks on Cleland’s patriotism and ads subtly connecting him to Bin Laden, Chambliss won the race.

    In the decade after 9/11 it has been nearly impossible for a major political figure to question the relentless expansion of the security state without the risk of being Chamblissed. Now, the strange politics of the Snowden Affair could . . . build cross-partisan support for a re-evaluation of America’s permanent war.

    Edward Snowden’s disclosures of NSA record-collection on domestic phone records should not have been shocking to anyone. Though the details were secret, nothing Snowden revealed is illegal and the details of the program had been disclosed to Congress. Yet, several things have changed . . . .

    Bin Laden is dead. The Iraq War is over and the Afghan War is winding down. The public is slowly beginning to adapt to the realities of global terrorism, recognizing that it poses no existential or political threat to the country. There may be a significant slice of the electorate across party lines that are prepared to place terrorism in a more realistic perspective and press for a rebalancing of anti-terror measures in favor of greater civil liberties.


    For the past decade, Republicans have been a powerful block of support for ever more extreme measures in protection of national security. However in the wake of the Snowden revelations, a solid majority of Republicans are expressing objections to the NSA program. Republicans still object to other proposals by the Obama Administration to scale back Bush-era anti-terrorism efforts, but any potential opening for new thinking on the subject should be welcome.

    Snowden himself makes a pretty dubious hero. The activities he disclosed are all legal. By immediately fleeing into the arms of dictatorial regimes, he has displayed a naiveté that undermines his credibility. Letting Snowden become a poster child for efforts to rein in the growth of the security state would be a serious political mistake. . . . keeping their distance from Snowden.

    In the meantime, the good Senator from Georgia is determined that he will never be Chamblissed himself. Senator Saxby Chambliss has implied that Snowden is a traitor who “put American lives in danger” He is pressing for the vigorous pursuit and prosecution of the leaker. Chambliss, like most major figures in both parties, is sticking by the unquestioned support of the security state that has been a safe position for over a decade.

    Snowden’s revelations by themselves are not potent enough to change our politics, but they offer an opening for civil libertarians to propose alternatives. If the liberty lobby in both parties can avoid being burdened by Snowden himself, the country may find opportunities in this incident to build a new consensus on terrorism that ends the unquestioned, permanent expansion of the security state.

    http://blog.chron.com/goplifer/2013/06/snowden-and-the-security-state/
  6. 28 Jun '13 20:33
    Originally posted by vivify
    Snowden is a moron. Was this really worth leaving his family and cushy lifestyle for? The general public gets bored fast, and moves on to the next topic. When this is old and no one cares about it anymore, Snowden will still be a fugitive who left his kid forever fatherless.

    Idiot.
    "Snowden is a moron. Was this really worth leaving his family and
    cushy lifestyle for?"
    --Vivify

    Perhaps Edward Snowden cares more deeply about some principles
    (such as protecting the American people from the US government's
    infringement of their privacy, as he perceives it) than his 'cushy lifestyle'.
    If some other members of his family disapprove of what he did, then it will
    not be the first time that families have been divided on issues of principle.

    "The general public gets bored fast, and moves on to the next topic."
    --Vivify

    Surely that's a compliment to the great American people!

    At least some of Edward Snowden's critics now seem to have stopped
    accusing him of being a spy who was motivated by hope for material gain.
    When Edward Snowden decided to become a 'whistle-blower', did he
    expect to be insulted by the likes of Vivify?
  7. 28 Jun '13 20:48 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    "Snowden is a moron. Was this really worth leaving his family and
    cushy lifestyle for?"
    --Vivify

    Perhaps Edward Snowden cares more deeply about some principles
    (such as protecting the American people from the US government's
    infringement of their privacy, as he perceives it) than his 'cushy lifestyle'.
    If some other members of his family disappr d to become a 'whistle-blower', did he
    expect to be insulted by the likes of Vivify?
    woa, respect!
  8. 28 Jun '13 22:23
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    "Snowden is a moron. Was this really worth leaving his family and
    cushy lifestyle for?"
    --Vivify

    Perhaps Edward Snowden cares more deeply about some principles
    (such as protecting the American people from the US government's
    infringement of their privacy, as he perceives it) than his 'cushy lifestyle'.
    If some other members of his family disappr ...[text shortened]... d to become a 'whistle-blower', did he
    expect to be insulted by the likes of Vivify?
    None of us can really say what is true motives are, but in my opinion he's just a self-important narcissist who likes being a martyr.
  9. Standard member empovsun
    Adepto 'er perfectu
    28 Jun '13 23:40
    Originally posted by vivify
    Snowden is a moron. Was this really worth leaving his family and cushy lifestyle for? The general public gets bored fast, and moves on to the next topic. When this is old and no one cares about it anymore, Snowden will still be a fugitive who left his kid forever fatherless.

    Idiot.
    that's a good point - he left his child just to give out conclusive evidence over something that was already reported on back in 2006

    anyone that leaves their kid behind is a scumbag
  10. 29 Jun '13 00:10 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by empovsun to vivify
    that's a good point - he left his child just to give out conclusive evidence over something that was already reported on back in 2006

    anyone that leaves their kid behind is a scumbag
    Is there any evidence that Edward Snowden's the father of any child?
    Vivify cited no specific evidence; did he just make up that 'fact'?
  11. 29 Jun '13 00:34
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    "Snowden is a moron. Was this really worth leaving his family and
    cushy lifestyle for?"
    --Vivify

    Perhaps Edward Snowden cares more deeply about some principles
    (such as protecting the American people from the US government's
    infringement of their privacy, as he perceives it) than his 'cushy lifestyle'.
    If some other members of his family disappr ...[text shortened]... d to become a 'whistle-blower', did he
    expect to be insulted by the likes of Vivify?
    Diddo that!!!!
  12. 29 Jun '13 00:39
    Originally posted by moon1969
    Reaction on Fox News

    [quote][b]Tucker Carlson Trashes Obama’s Approach To Snowden: ‘Most Arrogant Display…I’ve Ever Seen From’ Him


    Fox & Friends was not pleased with President Obama‘s handling of the Edward Snowden ordeal during Friday’s show when the crew revisited the remarks he made yesterday. Noting Obama’s unwillingness to be “scrambling jets ...[text shortened]... /tucker-carlson-trashes-obamas-approach-to-snowden-most-arrogant-display-ive-ever-seen-from-him/[/b]
    Tucker Carlson doesn't know what he is talking about. The more Obama wants him the more Putin wants him.

    http://www.latimes.com/news/world/worldnow/la-fg-wn-moscow-speculation-snowden-20130624,0,5791329.story

    That being said, Obama is still no different than Bush. They are both jerks who have done everything possible to turn this country into a Stalinist like police state.
  13. 29 Jun '13 00:42
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    Tucker Carlson doesn't know what he is talking about. The more Obama wants him the more Putin wants him.

    http://www.latimes.com/news/world/worldnow/la-fg-wn-moscow-speculation-snowden-20130624,0,5791329.story

    That being said, Obama is still no different than Bush. They are both jerks who have done everything possible to turn this country into a Stalinist like police state.
    Yes, a "police state" where guys like you can loudly criticize the President and the government with absolutely fear of reprisals.

    Oh, how I wish you really could experience a police state.
  14. 29 Jun '13 01:04 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by vivify
    Snowden is a moron. Was this really worth leaving his family and cushy lifestyle for? The general public gets bored fast, and moves on to the next topic. When this is old and no one cares about it anymore, Snowden will still be a fugitive who left his kid forever fatherless.

    Idiot.
    I think Snowden has got guts.

    I worked for a big company and I know there is a massive difference between a system that can look up a person, from a database. (spy on an individual person) vs....

    A system that can look at EVERYONE AT ONCE I SHouted that because there is a big difference, and at the press of a button can zero in on any social group from the entire USA you pick.

    When I worked for the company, in line with technology our systems got much much faster. And frankly almost became more Orwellian then we wanted. So I can understand a bit what Snowden is worried about and I wonder if there's anything in the US constitution that might defend what he did? I think in a way he was trying to act in the US interest.

    Personally I'd like to see him caught, put on trial (partly to put his case across) But given a lenient sentence 2 years maybe. Its criminal to betray the NSA like that but I can't fault what he did that much.
  15. Standard member vivify
    rain
    29 Jun '13 06:03 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    "Snowden is a moron. Was this really worth leaving his family and
    cushy lifestyle for?"
    --Vivify

    Perhaps Edward Snowden cares more deeply about some principles
    (such as protecting the American people from the US government's
    infringement of their privacy, as he perceives it) than his 'cushy lifestyle'.
    If some other members of his family disappr d to become a 'whistle-blower', did he
    expect to be insulted by the likes of Vivify?
    I thought you had me on ignore? Must've missed me.

    I started a thread not long ago asking for info on what Snowden revealed. While using Google, I thought I had read that he had a kid in Hawaii with his girlfriend. I can't seem to find it, so I must've been wrong. But I wasn't looking for personal details about his life, only what he revealed; so I skimmed through biographical info about him, and apparently made a mistake in the process.

    Okay. So he's not leaving a child. He's leaving a woman who he was engaged to, along with the rest of his family. Still a stupid move. Certainly there are things worth giving your life up for...but is this it?

    We knew Bush was wiretapping without proper legal clearance...did anything change? Is this really a topic the American people are passionate enough about, to bring about change? I don't think so. Americans are largely apathetic, and are really only following the Snowden case because it's entertaining: an outlaw with secret info on the run.

    If Snowden worked for a different nation with more passionate citizens, maybe this would matter, and maybe he'd spark some sort of revolution. But if Julian Assenge is any indication, this will just blow over. That's why this is stupid. But hey, it's not my life that's being ruined. I think Snowden's in for a huge bout of depression two years from now, when most Americans have already forgotten his name.