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  1. 03 Feb '16 02:52 / 5 edits
    On 1 February 2016, the American NBA's Sacramento Kings franchise (which is primarily
    owned by an Indian immigrant, Vivek Ranadive,) hastily stopped its distribution of
    free T-shirts to fans in order to celebrate the Chinese New Year of the Monkey.
    The T-shirt has the image of a purple monkey (wearing a crown--the Sacramento Kings's
    main team color is purple) with the words 'Happy Lunar New Year: Year of the Monkey 2016'.
    (The monkey did not at all resemble a racist stereotypical caricature of a black African person.)

    February 1st happens to mark the start of Black History Month in the USA,
    when Americans are supposed to celebrate achievements by black Americans
    in particular. The Sacramento Kings's star player, DeMarcus Cousins,
    objected to distributing the T-shirts apparently on the grounds that it must
    be a racist slight (albeit perhaps unintended) against all black Americans.
    As the team's star player, he must be kept happy, so the T-shirts were removed.
    DeMarcus Cousin has received considerable praise for being quick in
    exposing racist insensitivity and defending the honor of black Americans.

    In my view, his reasoning seems be like this:
    1) Racists have used monkey images to put down black people.
    2) Therefore, all monkey images must be racist. particularly if they happen
    to fall anywhere near anything considered important or related to black people.

    It's a coincidence that the Chinese New Year of the Monkey happens to
    begin in the same month as Black History Month in the USA. Should
    the Chinese revise their ancient lunar calendar to avoid that coincidence?

    While I would not expect DeMarcus Cousins to know this, monkey images
    exist as well in other Asian cultures, and they can be highly favourable.
    The Hindu epic Ramayana features the Vanaras, creatures who fuse
    human and monkey characteristics. Vanaras can be heroes in India.

    Likewise, swastikas are not the exclusive property of the Nazis.
    Swastikas existed as symbols in several Asian cultures long before the Nazis.
    Do Jews take offense at seeing swastikas as cultural artifacts in Asia?
    Do Jews demand that Asians erase these ancient cultural symbols
    because they supposedly must be anti-Semitic?

    So was DeMarcus Cousins right in believing that the T-shirts celebrating the
    Chinese New Year of the Monkey was a racist slight against black Americans?
    Or should he attempt to be less ethnocentric and more accepting of other cultures' symbols?
  2. 03 Feb '16 03:01
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    On 1 February 2016, the US NBA's Sacramento Kings franchise (which
    chiefly owned by an Indian immigrant) hastily stopped the distribution of
    free T-shirts to fans in order to celebrate the Chinese New Year of the Monkey.
    The T-shirt had the image of a purple monkey (wearing a crown--the Sacramento King's team color is purple) with the words 'Happy Lun ...[text shortened]... ns?
    Or should he attempt to be less ethnocentric and more accepting of other cultures' symbols?
    I suspect that you have already answered the questions yourself, strangely about an American NBA franchise that is little known and equally of little relevance to you.
  3. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    03 Feb '16 03:12
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    On 1 February 2016, the American NBA's Sacramento Kings franchise (which is primarily
    owned by an Indian immigrant, Vivek Ranadive,) hastily stopped its distribution of
    free T-shirts to fans in order to celebrate the Chinese New Year of the Monkey.
    The T-shirt has the image of a purple monkey (wearing a crown--the Sacramento Kings's
    main team color is ...[text shortened]... ns?
    Or should he attempt to be less ethnocentric and more accepting of other cultures' symbols?
    If the Sacramento Kings put a swastika on a free T-shirt to honor a hypothetical "Asian History Month", I imagine some Jews would find that offensive.

    An article putting the incident in context is here: http://espn.go.com/nba/story/_/id/14695362/sacramento-kings-scrap-planned-t-shirt-giveaway-demarcus-cousins-takes-issue
  4. 03 Feb '16 03:23 / 4 edits
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    If the Sacramento Kings put a swastika on a free T-shirt to honor a hypothetical "Asian History Month", I imagine some Jews would find that offensive.

    An article putting the incident in context is here: http://espn.go.com/nba/story/_/id/14695362/sacramento-kings-scrap-planned-t-shirt-giveaway-demarcus-cousins-takes-issue
    An 'apples and oranges' comparison. A monkey and a swastika are not comparable symbols.
    Monkeys exist in nature. Would DeMarcus Cousins or his supporters (like No1Marauder)
    object to monkey images on T-shirts distributed by the National Geographic Society?

    I also note that the swastika is a tangential, not a central symbol, in Asian cultures.
    (If it were so important, then why does the swastika appear in no Asian country's flag?)
    In contrast, it's hard to do an illustration of the Year of the Monkey without a monkey image.
    That said, the Sacramento Kings could have designed T-shirts without any image.

    Jeremy Lin (the only current NBA player of Chinese heritage) has said that he often hears
    (or heard) explicit anti-Asian racist slurs from American college or pro basketball fans who
    probably would be too afraid or embarrassed to shout the 'N-word' at his black teammates.
    He has acknowledged that few people in the American media apparently believe that
    such anti-Asian racism warrants their attention.
  5. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    03 Feb '16 04:26
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    An 'apples and oranges' comparison. A monkey and a swastika are not comparable symbols.
    Monkeys exist in nature. Would DeMarcus Cousins or his supporters (like No1Marauder)
    object to monkey images on T-shirts distributed by the National Geographic Society?

    I also note that the swastika is a tangential, not a central symbol, in Asian cultures.
    (If i ...[text shortened]... in the American media apparently believe that
    such anti-Asian racism warrants their attention.
    IF the swastika example was so "apples and oranges" perhaps you shouldn't have used it.
  6. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    03 Feb '16 05:32
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    Sweet Jesus.

    Anyway. Why does this sports team which doesn't, to me, have any connection with China or it's astrology want to celebrate the year of the monkey???

    Coloured people in the US seem very easily offended.
    Then again, the police keep shooting them... So, ya know, perhaps that makes them a little edgy?
    Or are you not allowed to use 'coloured' in the US? Negroes? Black Americans? The stuff of presidents?

    God knows.
    However, if a person looks at the picture of a monkey and feels he's being discriminated against, I guess there are a few issues which need resolving...
  7. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    03 Feb '16 12:52 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    An 'apples and oranges' comparison. A monkey and a swastika are not comparable symbols.
    Monkeys exist in nature. Would DeMarcus Cousins or his supporters (like No1Marauder)
    object to monkey images on T-shirts distributed by the National Geographic Society?

    I also note that the swastika is a tangential, not a central symbol, in Asian cultures.
    (If i ...[text shortened]... in the American media apparently believe that
    such anti-Asian racism warrants their attention.
    You might want to check our RJHinds' insightful post above if you are still unsure of why Afro-American basketball players might object to their team giving away T-shirts depicting a monkey wearing an outfit similar to the uniform the players wear.https://www.eurweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/year-of-the-monkey-tee.jpg
    http://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/8d1c8b5406b5b036a0f2f9e4bbbb88d8406c2902/c=0-0-2946-2215&r=x404&c=534x401/local/-/media/2016/02/02/USATODAY/USATODAY/635900116616501327-USATSI-9082993.jpg
  8. 03 Feb '16 14:50
    Originally posted by shavixmir
    Sweet Jesus.

    Anyway. Why does this sports team which doesn't, to me, have any connection with China or it's astrology want to celebrate the year of the monkey???

    Coloured people in the US seem very easily offended.
    Then again, the police keep shooting them... So, ya know, perhaps that makes them a little edgy?
    Or are you not allowed to use 'coloure ...[text shortened]... d feels he's being discriminated against, I guess there are a few issues which need resolving...
    Do the tee shirts need to be banned? Do the cops need to shoot an equal number of white people? Does the world need to stop using symbols? Should flags be banned? Since the English language was used by slave owners, shouldn't it be banned? This can go on and on but the only apparent answer to this well orchestrated dilemma is a one world order and a one world religion. How convenient!
  9. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    03 Feb '16 15:11
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    WTF is wrong with you? Seriously. I know you're trolling, but can you stop being a jackass once in a while?

    Aren't you religious? Act like it.
  10. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    03 Feb '16 16:28
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    On 1 February 2016, the American NBA's Sacramento Kings franchise (which is primarily
    owned by an Indian immigrant, Vivek Ranadive,) hastily stopped its distribution of
    free T-shirts to fans in order to celebrate the Chinese New Year of the Monkey.
    The T-shirt has the image of a purple monkey (wearing a crown--the Sacramento Kings's
    main team color is ...[text shortened]... ns?
    Or should he attempt to be less ethnocentric and more accepting of other cultures' symbols?
    This situation is another prime example of hypersensitivity run amok in the USA, and (as usual) the white man is the villain here. We've taken indian names and mascot photos out of hundreds of high schools and colleges to avoid offending indians, replaced 'workmen ahead' and 'flagmen ahead' with 'workers ahead' and 'flaggers ahead' to avoid offending women (though they make up a tiny minority of the actual employees) Replaced garbage men with sanitary engineers to avoid offending garbage men. And the list goes on and on and on. I can only imagine what's next on the list. Perhaps we need to create a 3rd bathroom to avoid offending transexuals. Do away with animal mascot names for schools to avoid offending the animal rights activists. Eliminate diapers because it demeans children. Replace King and Queen as chess pieces with unisex symbols to avoid offending royalty. How much of this is enough?
  11. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    03 Feb '16 19:19
    Originally posted by bill718
    This situation is another prime example of hypersensitivity run amok in the USA, and (as usual) the white man is the villain here. We've taken indian names and mascot photos out of hundreds of high schools and colleges to avoid offending indians, replaced 'workmen ahead' and 'flagmen ahead' with 'workers ahead' and 'flaggers ahead' to avoid offending women ( ...[text shortened]... as chess pieces with unisex symbols to avoid offending royalty. How much of this is enough?
    Is unnecessary offending of people really that important to you?

    Don't see how "the white man is the villain here"; that might be a useful bromide in some circumstances (a lot of whites here seem pathetically convinced that they are discriminated against despite all the evidence to the contrary) but seems particularly misplaced here. An employee of a private corporation raised concerns about the content of a promotion the company (which as the OP pointed out is primarily owned by a "non-white" at least in the silly race classifications in use) planned, the company after some discussion agreed with him that it might be considered offensive and withdrew it. No big deal there and certainly nothing remotely worth the outrage you have poured forth.
  12. 03 Feb '16 20:16
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    IF the swastika example was so "apples and oranges" perhaps you shouldn't have used it.
    No1Marauder misunderstood or distorted the context in which I used it.
    Monkeys exist in nature; a swastika is a human-made symbol.

    By the way, during the Second World War, which air force used a swastika as its main insignia?
    Not the Luftwaffe, which used a black cross (a small swastika on its aircraft's tail).
    It was the Ilmavoimat (Finnish Air Force). And the reason why the Ilmavoimat adopted
    the swastika were unrelated to Nazism.
  13. 03 Feb '16 20:21 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by normbenign
    I suspect that you have already answered the questions yourself, strangely about an
    American NBA franchise that is little known and equally of little relevance to you.
    Normbenign keeps showing his ignorance. The Sacramento Kings are well-known in Serbia,
    and for a long time were many Serbs' favourite NBA team. Years ago, the Sacramento Kings
    came close to winning an NBA championship while featuring two star players from Serbia.
    Today the franchise's basketball operations are run by one of these players, Vlade Divac.

    By the way, I have discussed basketball (including the NBA) with people in the former Yugoslavia.
  14. 03 Feb '16 20:23 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    You might want to check our RJHinds' insightful post above if you are still unsure of why Afro-American basketball players might object to their team giving away T-shirts depicting a monkey wearing an outfit similar to the uniform the players wear.https://www.eurweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/year-of-the-monkey-tee.jpg
    http://www.gannett-cdn.com/-m ...[text shortened]... =x404&c=534x401/local/-/media/2016/02/02/USATODAY/USATODAY/635900116616501327-USATSI-9082993.jpg
    RJHinds's racism would exist whether or not T-shirts with monkey images existed.
    RJHinds would keep trolling whether or not I had created this thread.
  15. 03 Feb '16 20:29
    Originally posted by bill718
    This situation is another prime example of hypersensitivity run amok in the USA, and (as usual) the white man is the villain here. We've taken indian names and mascot photos out of hundreds of high schools and colleges to avoid offending indians, replaced 'workmen ahead' and 'flagmen ahead' with 'workers ahead' and 'flaggers ahead' to avoid offending women ( ...[text shortened]... as chess pieces with unisex symbols to avoid offending royalty. How much of this is enough?
    "...and (as usual) the white man is the villain here."
    --Bill718

    His rant seems to be another example of Bill718, a self-pitying white American man, feeling oppressed.
    Who has explicitly blamed 'the white man'? The Sacramento Kings are primarily owned
    by an Indian immigrant. I doubt that even DeMarcus Cousins believes that the ancient
    Chinese created a 'Year of the Monkey' in their calendar in order to put down black people.

    "Perhaps we need to create a 3rd bathroom to avoid offending transexuals.'
    --Bill718

    That's unnnecessary. Why not simply allow them to use the public bathrooms of their gender preference?