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Debates Forum

  1. 06 Oct '13 22:07
    A majority in the House, a majority in the Senate, and the President all support clean CR to open the government and a clean debt ceiling vote to pay for past spending to avoid a US default.

    Boehner and a radical minority in the House -- less than one half of one branch of government -- hold the country hostage.



    http://www.chron.com/news/politics/article/Boehner-to-Obama-No-debt-hike-without-concessions-4873299.php?cmpid=hpbn
  2. 06 Oct '13 22:14
    Tea Party was a protest movement it had no power whatever and has none now you douche.
  3. Subscriber Sleepyguy
    Reepy Rastardly Guy
    06 Oct '13 22:17
    Originally posted by moon1969
    A majority in the House, a majority in the Senate, and the President all support clean CR to open the government and a clean debt ceiling vote to pay for past spending to avoid a US default.

    Boehner and a radical minority in the House -- less than one half of one branch of government -- hold the country hostage.



    http://www.chron.com/news/politics/article/Boehner-to-Obama-No-debt-hike-without-concessions-4873299.php?cmpid=hpbn
    Do you think it is a radical notion that the federal government should not spend more than it takes in year after year?
  4. Standard member KellyJayonline
    Walk your Faith
    06 Oct '13 22:47 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by moon1969
    A majority in the House, a majority in the Senate, and the President all support clean CR to open the government and a clean debt ceiling vote to pay for past spending to avoid a US default.

    Boehner and a radical minority in the House -- less than one half of one branch of government -- hold the country hostage.



    http://www.chron.com/news/politics/article/Boehner-to-Obama-No-debt-hike-without-concessions-4873299.php?cmpid=hpbn
    The majority in the House and Senate are all fine with >16T of debt and are
    more than willing to go as high as possible. The notion that is not an
    acceptable thing is being called radical is laughable, it is new to the people
    who are in power yes, they are so used to being able to spend money no
    one has without restraint is painful for them to just think they must live
    within our means.

    We have been held hostage by the undisciplined for a long time, for them
    it is like someone taking their drugs away.
    Kelly
  5. 07 Oct '13 01:33
    Originally posted by moon1969
    A majority in the House, a majority in the Senate, and the President all support clean CR to open the government and a clean debt ceiling vote to pay for past spending to avoid a US default.

    Boehner and a radical minority in the House -- less than one half of one branch of government -- hold the country hostage.



    http://www.chron.com/news/politics/article/Boehner-to-Obama-No-debt-hike-without-concessions-4873299.php?cmpid=hpbn
    Moonbeam, if a majority in the House support what you say, Obama would have a bill on his desk to sign. You are believing pure tauroscat. Since funding for the ACA is the single issue holdup, why not pass the rest, and debate the one holdup issue? Personally, I don't like the idea of passing another CR clean or otherwise. Congress has to get down to cutting spending.
  6. 07 Oct '13 04:38
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    Do you think it is a radical notion that the federal government should not spend more than it takes in year after year?
    I look forward to an intelligent discussion of when it makes sense for a government unit (city, state, nation) to fund an expense by creating debt (by a bond) as opposed to by current-year taxation. However, I do not look forward to seeing it on this forum.
  7. 07 Oct '13 18:54
    Originally posted by KilgoreTrout15
    Tea Party was a protest movement it had no power whatever and has none now you douche.
    Where have you been? Living under a rock? You need to get out more, and read a little.

    Boehner and a minority in the House are using the House power to shutdown the government.
  8. 07 Oct '13 18:55
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    Do you think it is a radical notion that the federal government should not spend more than it takes in year after year?
    Get the votes in both houses for it, and a signature by the President.
  9. 07 Oct '13 18:58 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by normbenign
    Moonbeam, if a majority in the House support what you say, Obama would have a bill on his desk to sign. You are believing pure tauroscat. Since funding for the ACA is the single issue holdup, why not pass the rest, and debate the one holdup issue? Personally, I don't like the idea of passing another CR clean or otherwise. Congress has to get down to cutting spending.
    Norm, you really show your ignorance. You have been doing that a lot lately. I am not talking about opinion differences but incredibly factual wrongs on your part.

    Do you get out much? Do you read any? Do you know that a MAJORITY in the House state they support and would vote for a clean CR and clean debt ceiling vote if Boehner let those votes go to the floor?

    In the House, the Democrats and rational Republicans outnumber the radical Tea Party ideologues. Get a freaking clue.

    It is Boehner and a MINORITY in the House who use the House power to forcibly shutdown the government. Less than one half of one branch of government subverts the democratic process.
  10. 07 Oct '13 18:58
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    Do you think it is a radical notion that the federal government should not spend more than it takes in year after year?
    Then Congress shouldn't pass budgets that call for borrowing more money. Not paying back the money isn't really a sensible solution.
  11. 07 Oct '13 19:06 / 3 edits
    The radical conservatives did not win the Presidency or Senate in 2012, and after long planning they now subvert the democratic process.

    A Federal Budget Crisis Months in the Planning

    WASHINGTON — Shortly after President Obama started his second term, a loose-knit coalition of conservative activists led by former Attorney General Edwin Meese III [the anti-porn king] gathered in the capital to plot strategy. Their push to repeal Mr. Obama’s health care law was going nowhere, and they desperately needed a new plan. Out of that session, held one morning in a location the members insist on keeping secret, came a little-noticed “blueprint to defunding Obamacare,” signed by Mr. Meese and leaders of more than three dozen conservative groups.

    It articulated a take-no-prisoners legislative strategy that had long percolated in conservative circles: that Republicans could derail the health care overhaul if conservative lawmakers were willing to push fellow Republicans — including their cautious leaders — into cutting off financing for the entire federal government. “We felt very strongly at the start of this year that the House needed to use the power of the purse,” said one coalition member, Michael A. Needham, who runs Heritage Action for America, the political arm of the Heritage Foundation. “At least at Heritage Action, we felt very strongly from the start that this was a fight that we were going to pick.”

    Last week the country witnessed the fallout from that strategy: a standoff that has shuttered much of the federal bureaucracy and unsettled the nation.

    To many Americans, the shutdown came out of nowhere. But interviews with a wide array of conservatives show that the confrontation that precipitated the crisis was the outgrowth of a long-running effort to undo the law, the Affordable Care Act . . . Although the law’s opponents say that shutting down the government was not their objective, the activists anticipated that a shutdown could occur — and worked with members of the Tea Party caucus in Congress who were excited about drawing a red line against a law they despise.

    A defunding “tool kit” created in early September included talking points for the question, “What happens when you shut down the government and you are blamed for it?” The suggested answer was the one House Republicans give today: “We are simply calling to fund the entire government except for the Affordable Care Act/Obamacare.”

    The current budget brinkmanship is just the latest development in a well-financed, broad-based assault on the health law, Mr. Obama’s signature legislative initiative. Groups like Tea Party Patriots, Americans for Prosperity and FreedomWorks are all immersed in the fight . . . The billionaire Koch brothers, Charles and David, have been deeply involved with financing the overall effort. . . .

    On Capitol Hill, the advocates found willing partners in Tea Party conservatives, who have repeatedly threatened to shut down the government if they do not get their way on spending issues. This time they said they were so alarmed by the health law that they were willing to risk a shutdown over it. (“This is exactly what the public wants,” Representative Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, founder of the House Tea Party Caucus, said on the eve of the shutdown.)

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/06/us/a-federal-budget-crisis-months-in-the-planning.html?src=mb&_r=0#h[]
  12. 07 Oct '13 19:19 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KellyJay
    The majority in the House and Senate are all fine with >16T of debt and are
    more than willing to go as high as possible. The notion that is not an
    acceptable thing is being called radical is laughable, it is new to the people
    who are in power yes, they are so used to being able to spend money no
    one has without restraint is painful for them to just thin ...[text shortened]... the undisciplined for a long time, for them
    it is like someone taking their drugs away.
    Kelly
    You miss the point. It is radical to subvert the democratic process.

    The people spoke. Americans voted. The President reelected. The Senate remained with the Democrats. And while the House remained with the Republicans, there are a majority in the House who support a clean CR and a clean debt ceiling vote to avoid a US default on past spending.

    That is the democratic process. In contrast, Boehner and a minority in the House use the House power to shutdown the government. That is not the democratic process.

    If you want to change, delay, or repeal a law (e.g., Obamacare), then get a a majority of votes in both houses of Congress, and a signature by the President. That is the democratic process. Shutting down the government because you do not have the votes to get your way is not the democratic process.
  13. 07 Oct '13 19:23
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    Do you think it is a radical notion that the federal government should not spend more than it takes in year after year?
    Shutting down the government because you do not have the votes to get your way is radical and is not the democratic process.
  14. 07 Oct '13 19:30 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    Do you think it is a radical notion that the federal government should not spend more than it takes in year after year?
    "The president [Bush II] had promised to cut taxes, and he did. Within six months of taking office, he pushed a trillion dollars worth of tax cuts through Congress.
    But O'Neill thought it should have been the end. After 9/11 and the war in Afghanistan, the budget deficit was growing. So at a meeting with the vice president after the mid-term elections in 2002, Suskind writes that O'Neill argued against a second round of tax cuts.

    "Cheney, at this moment, shows his hand," says Suskind. "He says, 'You know, Paul, Reagan proved that deficits don't matter. We won the mid-term elections, this is our due.' … O'Neill is speechless."

    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/01/09/60minutes/main592330.shtml

    Were Bush and Cheney radicals?
  15. 07 Oct '13 20:08
    Originally posted by moon1969
    Where have you been? Living under a rock? You need to get out more, and read a little.

    Boehner and a minority in the House are using the House power to shutdown the government.
    Totally untrue.
    You get 4 pinochios for that one moonbean.