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  1. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    01 Apr '10 00:16
    How much influence does climate have on GDP per capita? Temperate coastlines have historically had far stronger economies than others. Equitorial Guinea, however, is an example of a tropical nation with high GDP per capita.

    The role of geography in economic development has been woefully under analyzed in recent decades. That geography and development are closely linked is the very first, powerful impression one gets in examining the global distribution of economic activity. Virtually all developed countries are in the temperate zone; virtually all tropical countries are underdeveloped; and virtually all poor temperate zones countries in the Northern Hemisphere are far from major markets, often landlocked and frequently transiting from socialism.1 Among the top 30 countries ranked by 1994 per capita GDP, only four small countries — Hong Kong, Singapore, Oman, and Trinidad & Tobago — are in the tropics. These countries have a combined population of just 12 million, or 1.3% of the combined population of the top-30 countries.2 Moreover, Oman and Trinidad & Tobago achieve high income because of oil deposits while Hong Kong and Singapore are two city states that service a much poorer hinterland.

    http://www.earth.columbia.edu/sitefiles/file/about/director/pubs/EMPFIND.pdf


    Also see

    The Geography of Poverty and Wealth
    http://www.cid.harvard.edu/cidinthenews/articles/Sciam_0301_article.html
  2. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    01 Apr '10 09:19
    Guns, Germs and Steel.
  3. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    01 Apr '10 12:02 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Palynka
    Guns, Germs and Steel.
    Also:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5eKMspN-7Co&feature=player_embedded
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pw12KGSj53k&feature=player_embedded
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUwS1uAdUcI&feature=player_embedded

    Edit: http://www.michaelparenti.org/WhatDoEmpiresDo.html

    "This is another thing that empires do which too often goes unmentioned in the historical and political literature of countries like the United States, Britain, and France. Empires impoverish whole populations and kill lots and lots of innocent people... The purpose of all this killing is to prevent alternative, independent, self-defining nations from emerging. So the empire uses its state power to gather private wealth for its investor class. And it uses its public wealth to shore up its state power and prevent other nations from self-developing."
  4. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    01 Apr '10 12:09
    Originally posted by adam warlock
    Also:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5eKMspN-7Co&feature=player_embedded
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pw12KGSj53k&feature=player_embedded
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUwS1uAdUcI&feature=player_embedded
    I fell asleep. What was he talking about?
  5. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    01 Apr '10 12:12
    Originally posted by Palynka
    I fell asleep. What was he talking about?
    First link?
  6. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    01 Apr '10 12:18 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by adam warlock
    First link?
    Sorry, yeah. I thought they were all from the same guy so I didn't watch the others. I know the Ted one, although I don't know how it relates to the topic.

    I think Guns, Germs and Steel is relevant to the original question because it addresses the issue as to why colonizers and empires came mostly from temperate regions. All the rest starts from an already very unequal position and explains how these inequalities were kept through colonialism.
  7. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    01 Apr '10 12:27
    Originally posted by Palynka
    Sorry, yeah. I thought they were all from the same guy so I didn't watch the others. I know the Ted one, although I don't know how it relates to the topic.

    I think Guns, Germs and Steel is relevant to the original question because it addresses the issue as to why colonizers and empires came mostly from temperate regions. All the rest starts from an already very unequal position and explains how these inequalities were kept through colonialism.
    In the first video Michael Parenti explains why some of the things normally said about underdeveloped countries aren't true: how over-exploitation, bad use of resources, bad priorities by the leaders keep on making countries that are very rich on resources very poor countries on conditions for most of the population.

    The second video is about the scramble for Africa. Not a very long video, but it it already touches on some good points.
  8. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    01 Apr '10 12:29
    Originally posted by adam warlock
    In the first video Michael Parenti explains why some of the things normally said about underdeveloped countries aren't true: how over-exploitation, bad use of resources, bad priorities by the leaders keep on making countries that are very rich on resources very poor countries on conditions for most of the population.

    The second video is about the scramble for Africa. Not a very long video, but it it already touches on some good points.
    I don't disagree, but they don't explain how Europe came to be in a position where they could exploit Africa and not vice-versa.
  9. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    01 Apr '10 12:44
    Originally posted by Palynka
    I don't disagree, but they don't explain how Europe came to be in a position where they could exploit Africa and not vice-versa.
    That's true, but they do explain why countries that could be rich today (or at least richer) aren't. So I think you provided the first part of the explanation and I tried to provide the second part.
  10. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    01 Apr '10 12:46
    Originally posted by Palynka
    I don't disagree, but they don't explain how Europe came to be in a position where they could exploit Africa and not vice-versa.
    Another question is why China, once indisputably technologically superior to Europe, fell into stasis for so long, requiring the 20th century to rouse it from its millenial slumbers.
  11. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    01 Apr '10 12:51
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    How much influence does climate have on GDP per capita?
    This is a strangely framed question. It begs so many other questions that I can't answer it.
  12. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    01 Apr '10 12:54
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Another question is why China, once indisputably technologically superior to Europe, fell into stasis for so long, requiring the 20th century to rouse it from its millenial slumbers.
    I don't know enough about Chinese history to explain that, but if I remember correctly Diamond's arguments include China in the "advantaged" regions so its initial fast development fits his story. It's been a while since I read it though.
  13. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    01 Apr '10 12:56
    Originally posted by Palynka
    I don't know enough about Chinese history to explain that, but if I remember correctly Diamond's arguments include China in the "advantaged" regions so its initial fast development fits his story. It's been a while since I read it though.
    It does, hence the question: given its natural advantages (all that valuable, temperate land), why did China fall into a trance?
  14. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    01 Apr '10 13:05
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    It does, hence the question: given its natural advantages (all that valuable, temperate land), why did China fall into a trance?
    Well, the argument is that those natural advantages were mostly important in very early stages of development (not throughout).
  15. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    01 Apr '10 13:06
    Micklethwait and Wooldridge have a theory.

    But, hey, theories are like rectums, right?