Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Joined
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    04 Apr '17 15:271 edit
    Is one innocent person too many? Is it humane? Would you volunteer to witness an execution? Is it a deterrent?. Eight in eleven days in Arkansas. If you had to be exocuted which method would you chose? Thoughts on this story? http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-92894475/
  2. Joined
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    04 Apr '17 15:29
  3. Joined
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    04 Apr '17 16:052 edits
    Originally posted by kquinn909
    Is one innocent person too many? Is it humane? Would you volunteer to witness an execution? Is it a deterrent?. Eight in eleven days in Arkansas. If you had to be exocuted which method would you chose? Thoughts on this story? http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-92894475/
    http://www.ncadp.org/pages/harm-to-prison-workers

    "The death penalty takes a heavy toll on those directly involved in executions— prison wardens, chaplains, executioners, and corrections officers."
    ...
    "Many of those involved in executions have reported suffering PTSD-like symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares and other forms of distress. These symptoms are reported by multiple witnesses such as journalists, executioners, and wardens alike.

    “At night I would awaken to visions of executed inmates sitting on the edge of my bed,”

    --Ron McAndrew, Retired Warden, Florida State Prison"

    "If you care about human life, it isn’t just the fetus you care about. You care about all human life. [An execution] is the most premeditated murder you have ever seen. A lot of people were complicit in [the execution]—the governor, the parole boards, the courts. But they call on a very few to commit the actual murder with the sanction of the state. Let me tell you that the first one shook me to the core…And after the fifth [execution] I could not do it anymore. I couldn’t rationalize it anymore.”

    --Dr. Allen Ault, former Warden,
    Georgia Diagnostic and Classifications Prison"
  4. Cape Town
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    04 Apr '17 16:38
    Originally posted by kquinn909
    Is one innocent person too many?
    Yes. Given that it is cheaper to put people in life imprisonment, the equation is 'possible deterrent value + general revenge value vs number of innocent lives lost'
    I don't think there is significant deterrent value and I am not so heavily into revenge, I don't think its worth the innocent lives lost.
  5. Joined
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    04 Apr '17 17:13
    Originally posted by kquinn909
    Is one innocent person too many? Is it humane? Would you volunteer to witness an execution? Is it a deterrent?. Eight in eleven days in Arkansas. If you had to be exocuted which method would you chose? Thoughts on this story? http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-92894475/
    yes. no. no. no. it's arkansas, not surprised. listening to death penalty supporters argue for it. still arkansas, still not surprised
  6. Standard memberleestatic
    Hristos voskrese
    feckin' 'ell
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    04 Apr '17 20:45
    Originally posted by kquinn909
    Is one innocent person too many? Is it humane? Would you volunteer to witness an execution? Is it a deterrent?. Eight in eleven days in Arkansas. If you had to be exocuted which method would you chose? Thoughts on this story? http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-92894475/
    I don't agree with the death penalty, I personally think that having your freedom stripped away for the rest of your life is a greater deterrent, and far worse of a punishment. If I had to choose a method for my execution I'd go with the firing squad.
  7. Standard membersh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    New York
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    04 Apr '17 21:01
    Originally posted by kquinn909
    Is one innocent person too many? Is it humane? Would you volunteer to witness an execution? Is it a deterrent?. Eight in eleven days in Arkansas. If you had to be exocuted which method would you chose? Thoughts on this story? http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-92894475/
    Is one innocent person too many?

    === Yes. This is why I'd favor getting rid of the death penalty

    Is it humane?

    === Sure it's humane, unless you bring back hanging drawing and quartering

    Would you volunteer to witness an execution?

    === Not just for fun, but if there were a really good reason, I'd consider it.

    Is it a deterrent?

    === Most of the objective evidence indicates that it's probably not. Why? Not sure, but perhaps people driven to kill are probably too angry or desperate to consider the consequences much, or people just don't think they'll be caught.
  8. Standard memberRemoved
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    04 Apr '17 21:38
    Originally posted by kquinn909
    Is one innocent person too many? Is it humane? Would you volunteer to witness an execution? Is it a deterrent?. Eight in eleven days in Arkansas. If you had to be exocuted which method would you chose? Thoughts on this story? http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-92894475/
    Is one innocent person too many?

    This is the tough one to answer, but yes it is still the best choice.

    Is it humane?

    yes

    Would you volunteer to witness an execution

    Probably not but would consider it.

    Is it a deterrent?

    yes

    If you had to be exocuted which method would you chose?

    lethal injection.

    Thoughts on this story?

    Someone once told me a true story that appeared on 60 minutes or a similar show years ago. The producers showed the story of a man ( guilty of killing and raping a young teenage girl) sitting in a dark dreary cell awaiting execution.
    The background music was dreary, sad, etc. Then they showed the man who was abused as a child. They showed his baby pictures, him riding a bike as a youngster.
    His father was mean, and came from a sad child hood.
    To keep it short the people doing the show were against the death penalty, and by the time the show was over, they had you feeling sad and ready to forgive this man.
    It made me question the death penalty myself. But then he went on further and continued the story.
    Being a Christian, he questioned God, about "is this right?" Is there another way?

    Then he said he heard from the Lord. He said "what if we turn this story around?
    Suppose they showed the little girls baby pictures and riding her bike? Suppose they showed she had a wonderful life with loving parents.
    Suppose they asked how this young girl would never graduate from high school, never had her first prom, never had the chance to have a boyfriend or experience her first kiss? Never had the opportunity to get married and start her own family.
    Instead what if they mentioned that this pervert raped and strangled her?
    How do you think the community would respond then? It's all about telling the whole story.
  9. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    04 Apr '17 21:492 edits
    Originally posted by kquinn909
    Is one innocent person too many? Is it humane? Would you volunteer to witness an execution? Is it a deterrent?. Eight in eleven days in Arkansas. If you had to be exocuted which method would you chose? Thoughts on this story? http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-92894475/
    It's wrong to execute an innocent person. It's also wrong to imprison an innocent person for the rest of one's life.
    Innocent people may differ on whether they would prefer an earlier release through death
    or a lifetime of imprisonment without hope of release but through death.

    One argument is that if the sentence is life imprisonment, a person would have more time
    to prove one's innocence, get released, and receive sufficient 'compensation' for one's suffering.
    In many US death penalty cases, however, decades may elapse (with appeals) before
    the original death sentence is executed. And I cannot imagine how an innocent person
    who has spent nearly all one's life in prison and gets released when shortly before death
    could ever be sufficiently 'compensated' *financially* for one's suffering.

    "Is it humane?"
    --Kquinn909

    Modern methods of execution are not less inhumane than methods of killing in warfare.
    An execution may not be painless, but if a person deserves to be put to death, then why
    should not that person deserve to feel some pain of dying?

    "Is it a deterrent?"
    --Kquinn909

    There's little, if any, statistical evidence to support the claim that the death penalty's an effective deterrent to crime.
  10. Joined
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    04 Apr '17 22:09
    Originally posted by JS357
    http://www.ncadp.org/pages/harm-to-prison-workers

    "The death penalty takes a heavy toll on those directly involved in executions— prison wardens, chaplains, executioners, and corrections officers."
    ...
    "Many of those involved in executions have reported suffering PTSD-like symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares and other forms of distress. These symptoms ...[text shortened]... it anymore.”

    --Dr. Allen Ault, former Warden,
    Georgia Diagnostic and Classifications Prison"
    Right, it's better to lock them up for the rest of their lives so they can get gang raped for 30 to 40 years or so. That is much more humane.

    Or they can just let them out of jail so they can wreak more havoc.
  11. Zugzwang
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    04 Apr '17 23:151 edit
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karla_Faye_Tucker

    Karla Faye Tucker, a convicted murderess, was executed in Texas in 1998.
    Her longtime record (14 years on death row) as a 'model prisoner' and her widely publicized
    conversion to evangelical Christianity motivated many conservative Christian Americans
    (who normally zealously approved of the death penalty) to campaign that her life be spared.

    Within days of her execution, Fred Allen (who already had supervised 120 executions)
    suffered an emotional breakdown. He quit his job, gave up his pension, and changed
    his position from supporting the death penalty to opposing it.
  12. Subscriberjoe shmo
    Strange Egg
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    05 Apr '17 02:026 edits
    lets put it this way:

    Anders Breivik (my hero in Duchess's eyes)

    Murdered 77 innocent people in cold blood

    Sentenced to 21 years, mandatory minimum 10 years incarceration with the possibility of one or more extensions for as long as he is deemed a danger to society.

    This has to be a f-ing joke...

    That man shoud be executed in the most public of displays implimenting the most inhumane and nauseatingly painful medevial torture techniques known to man. Instead, he is given a sentence of a typical marijuana dealer in the US.

    Do I support execution?...Absoutely and unequivocally...yes.

    In these type of heinous cases there should be no appeals, no due process and no argument for "it cheaper to incarcerate". This one isn't about money, its about extiguishing a flame of pure evil.
  13. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    05 Apr '17 02:301 edit
    Originally posted by joe shmo
    lets put it this way:

    Anders Breivik (my hero in Duchess's eyes)

    Murdered [b]77
    innocent people in cold blood

    Sentenced to 21 years, mandatory minimum 10 years incarceration with the possibility of one or more extensions for as long as he is deemed a danger to society.

    This has to be a f-ing joke...

    That man shoud be ...[text shortened]... eaper to incarcerate". This one isn't about money, its about extiguishing a flame of pure evil.[/b]
    Evidently, Joe Shmo's a racist. I have written that some, though not all, racists at RHP
    apparently admire Anders Breivik. I write that about those racists (such as Eladar) who
    particularly hate Muslims or have expressed or implied approval of the genocide of Muslims.

    I don't recall in particular Joe Shmo venting hatred of Muslims. (Joe Shmo might well hate
    all Muslims, but I don't recall him ranting much about it.) So I don't recall writing that Joe Shmo
    in particular admires Ander Breivik. If I did, then Joe Shmo should quote exactly what
    I wrote in context, including identifying the thread and my post within it.
  14. Joined
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    281346
    05 Apr '17 02:34
    Me personally. I ride the fence. Killing a innocent person is the worst part. And w/dna testing many have been exonerated. I'd be mighty pissed when released. Money worth all that time? No way. On the other hand, kill one of mine and you aren't going to have to worry about the law. And I will make you suffer bigtime before I finish you off. But I will make sure you are the guilty party unlike a DA looking for a notch on his belt. My prefered method of my own death would be a good speedball. 🙂
  15. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    05 Apr '17 02:401 edit
    Originally posted by joe shmo
    lets put it this way:

    Anders Breivik (my hero in Duchess's eyes)

    Murdered [b]77
    innocent people in cold blood

    Sentenced to 21 years, mandatory minimum 10 years incarceration with the possibility of one or more extensions for as long as he is deemed a danger to society.

    This has to be a f-ing joke...

    That man shoud be ...[text shortened]... eaper to incarcerate". This one isn't about money, its about extiguishing a flame of pure evil.[/b]
    What punishment would Joe Shmo assign to the American soldiers who massacred the
    people of the Vietnamese village of My Lai in 1968?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Lai_Massacre

    "The Mỹ Lai Massacre (Vietnamese: thảm sát Mỹ Lai, [tʰâːm ʂǎːt mǐˀ lāːj] (
    listen); /ˌmiːˈlaɪ/, /ˌmiːˈleɪ/, or /ˌmaɪˈlaɪ/)[1] was the Vietnam War mass killing of between
    347 and 504 unarmed civilians in South Vietnam on March 16, 1968. It was committed
    by U.S. Army soldiers from Company C, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 11th
    Brigade, 23rd (Americal) Infantry Division. Victims included men, women, children, and
    infants. Some of the women were gang-raped and their bodies mutilated."
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