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Debates Forum

  1. 15 Aug '17 08:06
    "In the field of psychology, the Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias wherein persons of low ability suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their cognitive ability as greater than it is." in Wikipedia

    "Trump’s ‘Dangerous Disability’? It’s the Dunning-Kruger Effect
    We’re all ignorant, but Trump takes it to a different level.
    Earlier that week (May 17), syndicated columnist George Will offered an amateur diagnosis of sorts. Will’s assessment, based on Trump’s off-base statements about the Civil War and other topics, was that the president suffers from a “dangerous disability” -- not only because he’s ignorant and ignorant of his ignorance, but because he “does not know what it is to know something.”
    It turns out Will is on to something, and not just because a few academics agree with him. His observations about Trump may have prompted him to independently discover a kind of meta-incompetence known as the Dunning-Kruger effect." in Bloomberg.

    Just discovered this pearl, a scientific explanation of Trump's behaviour.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-05-12/trump-s-dangerous-disability-it-s-the-dunning-kruger-effect
  2. Subscriber mchill
    cryptogram
    15 Aug '17 09:59 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @ptriple42
    "In the field of psychology, the Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias wherein persons of low ability suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their cognitive ability as greater than it is." in Wikipedia

    "Trump’s ‘Dangerous Disability’? It’s the Dunning-Kruger Effect
    We’re all ignorant, but Trump takes it to a different level.
    Earli ...[text shortened]... oomberg.com/view/articles/2017-05-12/trump-s-dangerous-disability-it-s-the-dunning-kruger-effect
    Possibly, but Dunning–Kruger effect or no, we're stuck with him for the time being. Hopefully Mr. Mueller will hasten his exit from public office.
  3. 15 Aug '17 13:46
    If it wasn't for the Dunning-Kruger effect, Donald Trump would have obtained 0 votes.
  4. Standard member finnegan
    GENS UNA SUMUS
    15 Aug '17 20:44
    Originally posted by @mchill
    Possibly, but Dunning–Kruger effect or no, we're stuck with him for the time being. Hopefully Mr. Mueller will hasten his exit from public office.
    Having someone of limited cognitive ability in high office is surely not unusual. Most states (and large organisations, public or private) have systems in place to ensure that there is a team of appropriate abiity and experience on whom such people can depend for sound advice and guidance. Indeed, the public face of a "leader" is often a convenient arrangement behind which the real managers get on with their business. So for example, it would be nice to imagine that the real professional military leaders will not be open to persuasion from an excitable amateur when it comes to taking important decisions that would provoke or even initiate war or dangerous behaviours. In Trump's case, the tragedy is the people he is surrounded by do not inspire confidence - they inspire fear and dread.
  5. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    18 Aug '17 20:55
    I believed all along that George W. Bush (the younger) was simply the horse that Cheney and Rumsfeld rode into office and that Cheney and Rumsfeld were the real policy-makers in that presidency.

    As for the tRump presidency, it is hemorrhaging advisors and secretarial officers at an alarming rate. It appears that tRump did not really expect to win the election; how else to explain the near total lack of preparedness we have seen since the election ?
  6. Standard member finnegan
    GENS UNA SUMUS
    18 Aug '17 21:34
    Originally posted by @moonbus
    I believed all along that George W. Bush (the younger) was simply the horse that Cheney and Rumsfeld rode into office and that Cheney and Rumsfeld were the real policy-makers in that presidency.

    As for the tRump presidency, it is hemorrhaging advisors and secretarial officers at an alarming rate. It appears that tRump did not really expect to win the election; how else to explain the near total lack of preparedness we have seen since the election ?
    I have the same opinion about Bush - just a frontman.

    Henry Kissinger, in his 2014 book World Order, commented on this phenomenon with some concern: ". "What once had been substantive debates about the content of governance will reduce candidates to being spokesmen for a marketing effort... The candidates' main role may become fund-raising rather than the elaboration of issues. Is the marketing effort designed to convey the candidates' convictions or are the convictions expressed by the candidate the reflections of a "big-data" research effort...? If the gap between the qualities required for election and those essential for the conduct of office becomes too wide, the conceptual grasp and sense of history that should be part of foreign policy may be lost..."

    With the Trump administration I think Kissinger is proven correct. For what it's worth, I also suspect that Trump often if not always just signs announcements prepared for him by lobbyists: that way he looks productive when he is no more than a front guy signing the documents placed in front of him. Strangely enough though, it looks like lobbyists are not as clever as their clients think they are.
  7. 18 Aug '17 21:41
    Originally posted by @finnegan
    I have the same opinion about Bush - just a frontman.

    Henry Kissinger, in his 2014 book World Order, commented on this phenomenon with some concern: [i]". "What once had been substantive debates about the content of governance will reduce candidates to being spokesmen for a marketing effort... The candidates' main role may become fund-raising rather ...[text shortened]... angely enough though, it looks like lobbyists are not as clever as their clients think they are.
    What's interesting is that when Trump delivers a prepared speech, he gives live commentary on his own speech - as if (which is actually probably true) he is reading it for the first time.
  8. Standard member finnegan
    GENS UNA SUMUS
    19 Aug '17 00:07
    Originally posted by @kazetnagorra
    What's interesting is that when Trump delivers a prepared speech, he gives live commentary on his own speech - as if (which is actually probably true) he is reading it for the first time.
    Case in point - that moving speech about racism, white supremacists and nazis, which he clearly disagreed with quite strongly given his commentary.
  9. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    19 Aug '17 04:52
    Originally posted by @finnegan
    ... Henry Kissinger, in his 2014 book World Order, commented on this phenomenon with some concern: ". "What once had been substantive debates about the content of governance will reduce candidates to being spokesmen for a marketing effort... The candidates' main role may become fund-raising rather than the elaboration of issues. Is the marketing effor ...[text shortened]... cy may be lost..."

    With the Trump administration I think Kissinger is proven correct...
    One of the problems with tRump's 'team' is that they got their big-data wrong. What appeals to a voter segment, i.e., getting elected, is not necessarily what constitutes good governance, i.e, policy-driven decisions.