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  1. 31 Jul '11 23:33
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-14341089

    Tens of thousands of people have packed Cairo's Tahrir Square, after the first call by Islamist leaders for nationwide demonstrations since President Hosni Mubarak was overthrown in February.

    Many protesters - dominated by Muslim Brotherhood supporters - are calling for an Islamic state and Sharia law.


    Correspondents say the rallies will be a worrying development for secularists.

    The Brotherhood is the most organised political force in Egypt, although it was not prominent in the revolution.

    Tensions have been running high between Egypt's Islamist and secular groups, who are at odds over the transition to democracy in the Arab world's most populated country


    ........

    Assuming it is true that the way in which the revolution in Egypt unfolds will ultimately set the tone for other countries in the region which have been engulfed by popular protests, as some commentators have claimed, should these developments be taken as worrying signs of what's to come?

    Is there any real possibility that the Arab Spring may be sabotaged by radical Islamists or is Egypt, and other countries in a similar state of gradual transition and political uncertainty, on an irreversible march towards liberal democracy and human rights?
  2. 31 Jul '11 23:35
    Originally posted by generalissimo
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-14341089

    [b]Tens of thousands of people have packed Cairo's Tahrir Square, after the first call by Islamist leaders for nationwide demonstrations since President Hosni Mubarak was overthrown in February.

    Many protesters - dominated by Muslim Brotherhood supporters - are calling for an Islamic state and ...[text shortened]... political uncertainty, on an irreversible march towards liberal democracy and human rights?
    Radical Islamists are taking over Egypt? Shocking I tell ya!!

    Boy, I never saw that one coming. Next thing you know you will be telling me the sun is going to rise tomorrow. Pfft.
  3. 31 Jul '11 23:42
    Originally posted by whodey
    Radical Islamists are taking over Egypt? Shocking I tell ya!!

    Boy, I never saw that one coming. Next thing you know you will be telling me the sun is going to rise tomorrow. Pfft.
    the sun doesn't rise, we rotate around it while spinning on your axis. i can see how you made that mistake though.
  4. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    31 Jul '11 23:48 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by generalissimo
    [/b]http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-14341089

    Tens of thousands of people have packed Cairo's Tahrir Square, after the first call by Islamist leaders for nationwide demonstrations since President Hosni Mubarak was overthrown in February.

    Many protesters - dominated by Muslim Brotherhood supporters - are calling for an Islamic state and political uncertainty, on an irreversible march towards liberal democracy and human rights?
    It would be best to wait until the results of the Parliamentary and Presidential elections to be held this Fall before making any snap judgments. The Brotherhood may well get badly beaten though it is likely that the elections will result in a rather conservative government. Most Egyptians are conservative Muslims after all.
  5. 01 Aug '11 00:00 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by trev33
    the sun doesn't rise, we rotate around it while spinning on your axis. i can see how you made that mistake though.
    Ok you cheeky little monkey!!

    BTW: The Catholic church has Galileo on record as recanting that notion, so feel free at any time to take it back!!

    Recant!!
  6. 01 Aug '11 00:17 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    Ok you cheeky little monkey!!

    BTW: The Catholic church has Galileo on record as recanting that notion, so feel free at any time to take it back!!

    Recant!!
    The Catholic Church has since then adopted a more cooperative and cordial stance towards scientific inquiry, and has withdrawn their statements on Galileo.

    I don't think your post accurately portrays the Catholic Church's position on this (irrelevant) matter.
  7. 01 Aug '11 00:24 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    It would be best to wait until the results of the Parliamentary and Presidential elections to be held this Fall before making any snap judgments. The Brotherhood may well get badly beaten though it is likely that the elections will result in a rather conservative government. Most Egyptians are conservative Muslims after all.
    Wouldn't you say that the fact the Muslim Brotherhood is a comparably well-organized and well-established political group, in relation to others in country, will prove to be decisive in these elections?
  8. 01 Aug '11 01:35
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    So what is your point?
  9. 01 Aug '11 01:36 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by generalissimo
    The Catholic Church has since then adopted a more cooperative and cordial stance towards scientific inquiry, and has withdrawn their statements on Galileo.

    I don't think your post accurately portrays the Catholic Church's position on this (irrelevant) matter.
    As Marauder has so eloquently put it, I was goofing with you kids.

    Just having a bit of fun.

    Now its time to get serious!!

    Why exactly are we to be surprised that radicals are taking over Egypt? Have they not lingered in the wings for this very moment?

    This is simply a power vacuum. Those that hold the most power and are best organized will fill the vacuum. In Egypt, this is obviously the radicals. In comparison, during the American Revolution it was the Founding Fathers.

    The common man never assumes power, rather, they simply trade one master for another.
  10. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    01 Aug '11 01:37
    Originally posted by generalissimo
    Wouldn't you say that the fact the Muslim Brotherhood is a comparably well-organized and well-established political group, in relation to others in country, will prove to be decisive in these elections?
    Not necessarily. Their positions are well-known; if you're not already a supporter, I find it hard to believe they'll draw a lot of votes from undecideds.

    Polls suggest the race is wide open: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/07/26/egypt-political-poll-muslim-brotherhood-influence-troubles-for-west.html?om_rid=Nsfm59&om_mid=_BOMGO2B8chCZ6g

    29% are undecided and votes are split among 12 parties. The Brotherhood gets a plurality, but of only 17%. Moreover, only 27% said a MB majority would be a "good thing" while 35% said it would be a "bad thing" (the article curiously finds this result "ominous".

    I'll be somewhat surprised if the Brotherhood winds up as the biggest party and shocked if they are anywhere near a majority.
  11. 01 Aug '11 02:00 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Not necessarily. Their positions are well-known; if you're not already a supporter, I find it hard to believe they'll draw a lot of votes from undecideds.

    Polls suggest the race is wide open: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/07/26/egypt-political-poll-muslim-brotherhood-influence-troubles-for-west.html?om_rid=Nsfm59&om_mid=_BOMGO2 herhood winds up as the biggest party and shocked if they are anywhere near a majority.
    So what is your take on the other political parties? Is the Brotherhood the only "radical" party? Furthermore, if they are "radical" then they are more likely to be militant and motivated than the nonradicals. We saw something similar happen in Germany at one time with the Nazi party being in the "minority".
  12. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    01 Aug '11 02:23
    Originally posted by whodey
    So what is your take on the other political parties? Is the Brotherhood the only "radical" party? Furthermore, if they are "radical" then they are more likely to be militant and motivated than the nonradicals. We saw something similar happen in Germany at one time with the Nazi party being in the "minority".
    I have no idea what you or anyone else means by "radical". The MB is an Islamist Party. The other parties which draw any significant support in the poll are "liberal" or "leftist" with the exception of the National Democratic Party which was Sadat and Muburak's party (and which is actually dissolved). However, what passes for "liberal" in Egypt is quite different from what is "liberal" in the West. Any popularly elected government is very likely to be prone to including religious principles of Islam as a basis of civil law.
  13. 01 Aug '11 08:33
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Not necessarily. Their positions are well-known; if you're not already a supporter, I find it hard to believe they'll draw a lot of votes from undecideds.

    Polls suggest the race is wide open: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/07/26/egypt-political-poll-muslim-brotherhood-influence-troubles-for-west.html?om_rid=Nsfm59&om_mid=_BOMGO2 ...[text shortened]... herhood winds up as the biggest party and shocked if they are anywhere near a majority.
    I thought this was an interesting aspect of the article you posted:

    TURKEY
    Regional Power Broker?

    The apparent winner among Egyptians? Turkey. Among regional powers, it was viewed as having demonstrated the most support for the revolution, as well as the most concern about Egypt’s interests and the most positive effect on the world. As the Middle East shifts, Egyptians are clearly looking increasingly to Turkey for leadership.


    Although I wouldn't want to minimise the tension in modern Turkey, I feel that Turkey is likely to be, on balance, a positive influence on Egypt, with the present governing party's brand of moderate, pragmatic Islamism seeming to point to a middle way between what must seem to most Muslims an unacceptably licentious Western-style secularism on the one hand and the tyrannies of full-scale sharia law on the other.
  14. 01 Aug '11 08:49
    Originally posted by whodey
    So what is your take on the other political parties? Is the Brotherhood the only "radical" party? Furthermore, if they are "radical" then they are more likely to be militant and motivated than the nonradicals. We saw something similar happen in Germany at one time with the Nazi party being in the "minority".
    The Muslim Brotherhood Supports Terrorism. A pretty good indication that they are radical.


    Read more at: http://www.investigativeproject.org/2581/fbi-chief-muslim-brotherhood-supports-terrorism
  15. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    01 Aug '11 09:02
    Originally posted by utherpendragon
    The Muslim Brotherhood Supports Terrorism.
    Isn't this what Muburak used to say?