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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Subscriber divegeester
    Nice suit...
    14 May '09 20:14
    The whole MP's expenses fiasco has proven British politicians to be what the public in general has suspected for many years, i.e. ridiculous at best and criminal at worst; we are in the UK, an embarrassment to the democratic world.

    I listened very closely to my local MP’s explanation of his own particular shameful revelations and I am appalled not only that he and his wife were claiming double house allowances on one house for 8+ years, but that he appeared on national TV hiding behind some pathetic excuse that he "took advice" on what was allowed.

    I have no intention of voting for or even respecting a person who can abuse their position of trust, and then claim to be ignorant of the moral implications of their decisions. He is an MP of Her Majesty’s Government for crying out loud! How can he either not no the difference between right and wrong, or indeed lie about knowing the difference?

    The right thing for a person of leadership to do in this situation is for him to resign his seat as an MP and fight it in a open election if he has the courage to do so.
  2. 14 May '09 20:17
    Originally posted by divegeester
    The whole MP's expenses fiasco has proven British politicians to be what the public in general has suspected for many years, i.e. ridiculous at best and criminal at worst; we are in the UK, an embarrassment to the democratic world.

    I listened very closely to my local MP’s explanation of his own particular shameful revelations and I am appalled not on ...[text shortened]... m to resign his seat as an MP and fight it in a open election if he has the courage to do so.
    hmm...sounds alot like american politics
  3. Subscriber divegeester
    Nice suit...
    14 May '09 20:47
    Originally posted by utherpendragon
    hmm...sounds alot like american politics
    Thanks for the hope..
  4. Subscriber divegeester
    Nice suit...
    14 May '09 22:02
    Bump for sheer disgusting greed, pathetic resignations, filthy lies and depressing enevitability of it all -
  5. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    15 May '09 01:22
    Originally posted by divegeester
    Bump for sheer disgusting greed, pathetic resignations, filthy lies and depressing enevitability of it all -
    Indeed. But... good news about the chocolate orange.
  6. 15 May '09 13:16
    anyone who put in dodgy claims should be fired, the rest should all be given a large pay CUT to teach the whole lot of them a lesson
  7. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    15 May '09 13:26
    Originally posted by eamon o
    anyone who put in dodgy claims should be fired...
    Stigmatize them!
  8. 15 May '09 15:42
    Originally posted by divegeester
    The whole MP's expenses fiasco has proven British politicians to be what the public in general has suspected for many years, i.e. ridiculous at best and criminal at worst; we are in the UK, an embarrassment to the democratic world.

    I listened very closely to my local MP’s explanation of his own particular shameful revelations and I am appalled not on ...[text shortened]... m to resign his seat as an MP and fight it in a open election if he has the courage to do so.
    They should pay the money back, or be shot.
  9. Standard member Redmike
    Godless Commie
    15 May '09 19:41
    We have had politicians in the UK (the Scottish parliament) who only took half their salaries, the equivelant of the average skilled workers' wage.

    If people are to be remotely representative, they cannot be so distant from ordinary working class people that they don't understand their issues.

    If you think the state owes you a huge salary, and an expenses system which buys practically everything you might need, how can you possibly represent anyone but the priveleged.
  10. 16 May '09 09:44
    The UK electoral system needs reform.
  11. 16 May '09 10:12
    It's theft. Right? And I don't see any reason why they get away with it by the promise of paying it (or some) back or resignation. Not enough. Never ever they should be allowed to have a job in politics, or any other leading position. When one thinks it's alright to let the taxpayer pay for his private garden because the rules are not so clear on this subject, the country should be very worried about the rest of his/her intentions and abillities. To court with these bastards and let them do some real time.
  12. 16 May '09 17:06 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    The UK electoral system needs reform.
    they've been needing a reform for 100 years!

    house of lords?! come on!
  13. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    17 May '09 03:43 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by generalissimo
    They should pay the money back, or be shot.
    Genralissimo. people tease you here for your chosen Franco/Pinochet screen name, but is it fair? Have we misunderstood the reference you intend?

    "The [Kuomintang ] was a dictatorial regime that had risen to power partly through exploiting its links with Shanghai gangsters. It was monstrously corrupt and mismanaged the economy into hyperinflation. It collapsed, largely, it seemed, under the weight of its own fecklessness and cruelty, and ended up ruling just Taiwan, from where Chiang dreamed ever more forlornly of recovering the mainland. Alliance with the dictatorship he brutally established there seemed one of those embarrassing right-wing entanglements the cold war foisted on America. Chiang himself, with his glamorous wife, Soong Mayling, his cool, austere manner and his comic-book title, “the Generalissimo”, seemed somewhere on the spectrum between joke and monster."

    Taken from "The man who lost China", a review of 'The Generalissimo: Chiang Kai-shek and the Struggle for Modern China' (2009) By Jay Taylor, in The Economist, May 7th 2009.
    http://www.economist.com/books/displaystory.cfm?story_id=13606318&CFID=59259441&CFTOKEN=71503607

    As for the current scandal in the U.K., as disgraceful and aggravating as it may be, let's be thankful that we (or most of us, anyway) don't live under the kind of cruel, criminal, avaricious regimes that the "Generalissimos" of this world envision or pine for.
  14. Subscriber divegeester
    Nice suit...
    17 May '09 09:30
    Originally posted by FMF
    Genralissimo. people tease you here for your chosen Franco/Pinochet screen name, but is it fair? Have we misunderstood the reference you intend?

    "The [Kuomintang ] was a dictatorial regime that had risen to power partly through exploiting its links with Shanghai gangsters. It was monstrously corrupt and mismanaged the economy into hyperinflation. It collapsed ...[text shortened]... inal, avaricious regimes that the "Generalissimos" of this world envision or pine for.
    True indeed, a reminder of the soul of democracy.

    I understand the general's tongue-in-cheek comment though and believe that some of these MPs will be pulling in all their favors with the hidden echelons to avoid criminal proceedings rather than the firing squad.
  15. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    17 May '09 09:45
    Originally posted by divegeester
    True indeed, a reminder of the soul of democracy.

    I understand the general's tongue-in-cheek comment ...
    Perhaps it was tongue in cheek. Who knows? If you follow the posts of generalissimo, you'll know that he approves of democracy only in so far as it delivers what he approves of. Failing that, he appreciates the "good things" that dictatorships do, hence his adoration of Pinochet and Franco, and probably others.

    Let us remember that the real Generalissimos of this world, the ones that our little generalissimo hankers after, put bullets in the heads of people trying to stop the corrupt and the venal collaborators. So who knows which cheek generalissimo's tongue is in? Or whether he thinks anything through at all before he posts it.