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  1. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    07 Mar '14 08:15 / 3 edits
    I often wonder what our world and our attitudes would be like is we were forced to live anothers life, who's opinions differed form ours for a month...

    * If someone who could never afford to go to college traded places with a med student from a wealthy family, amid severe parental and professional expectations, who was just informed his grades were not adequate to remain there, despite working and studying 60-70 hrs a week, now has to inform his parents that he has not lived up to their expectations.

    * If a wealthy high powered business executive who just closed a lucrative deal to ship several thousand jobs to India traded places with an ex employee forced to live in their car in a midwest winter because of this "lucrative deal" , and now he couldn't pay his bills, and is homeless.

    * If an employee dissatisfied with his wages, traded places with the struggling owner of the small company he works for who hasn't been able to pay himself for 3 weeks, because a key client took their business to another company.

    * If a wealthy young man who was taught "the poor are that way because they don't work hard enough" traded places with minimum wage employee from a poor family who now has to work 45-55 hours a week simply to pay rent and eat.

    * If an anti gun advocate traded places with a mother who now has to explain to her children that their father is dead because they didn't have a gun to defend themselves against the men who broke into their home last week and killed him.

    * If a bank executive, guilty of defauding the bank he manages was aquitted through lack of admissible evidence and/or reasonable doubt traded places with a single mother, who's teller job was terminated due to branch closings that followed this fraud.

    And the list goes on. It's not going to happen of course, but I often wonder how would these experiences change us? How would they change the way we vote? How would this change the way we think of others? It's easy for us to sit at our keyboards and type our opinions, but what if we had to walk a mile in another's shoes. Thoughts?
  2. 07 Mar '14 10:15
    Originally posted by bill718
    I often wonder what our world and our attitudes would be like is we were forced to live anothers life, who's opinions differed form ours for a month...

    It's not going to happen of course, but I often wonder how would these experiences change us?
    Because a very large part of suffering involves your long term outlook on life, a months swop just wouldn't be the same. If you know you are going back to your old life, you won't experience the feeling of hopelessness that many people in the world have - especially the poor and uneducated.

    There was a time when I live in Ndola, Zambia, and a friend and I like to ask people we me when they planned to buy a car. It was interesting how many made it clear that they never expected to own a car in their lives.
    Another big thing I have notices when moving to a richer country is that richer people tend to plan much longer term. Poor people worry about next months salary and tomorrows food. Rich people think about what schools their kids will go to, what career they should plan out etc.

    Having said that, there really is nothing stopping you from experiencing some of the conditions other people experience and nothing stopping you from visiting other countries and seeing how people live, talking to them, staying with them, if only for a short time.
    I can say that for me, coming to South Africa was quite a big eye opener and it was amazing just how wrong my impression of the place was before I came here.
  3. 07 Mar '14 12:23
    Originally posted by bill718
    [b]
    * If someone who could never afford to go to college traded places with a med student from a wealthy family, amid severe parental and professional expectations, who was just informed his grades were not adequate to remain there, despite working and studying 60-70 hrs a week, now has to inform his parents that he has not lived up to their expectations.
    It's far worse bill. Our wonderful politicians keep lowering interest on student loans so that students will be saddled with larger and larger debt when they graduate. Then when they do graduate, there are no jobs bill, or if they find one, it is a low paying job.

    I know, I know, it's all Bush's fault.
  4. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    07 Mar '14 14:28 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    It's far worse bill. Our wonderful politicians keep lowering interest on student loans so that students will be saddled with larger and larger debt when they graduate. Then when they do graduate, there are no jobs bill, or if they find one, it is a low paying job.

    I know, I know, it's all Bush's fault.
    No Whodey, it's not "all Bush's fault" or anyone's fault for that matter. As usual you've missed the point altogether. It's about seeing and experiencing things from the point of view of someone other than yourself. It's sad that I need to spell this out for you.
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    07 Mar '14 18:37
    Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in their shoes.

    That way if they don't like your criticism, at least you are a mile away and have their shoes.
  6. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    07 Mar '14 18:46
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in their shoes.

    That way if they don't like your criticism, at least you are a mile away and have their shoes.
    Clever!
  7. 07 Mar '14 21:07 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by bill718
    I often wonder what our world and our attitudes would be like is we were forced to live anothers life, who's opinions differed form ours for a month...

    * If someone who could never afford to go to college traded places with a med student from a wealthy family, amid severe parental and professional expectations, who was just informed his grades were not ad ...[text shortened]... keyboards and type our opinions, but what if we had to walk a mile in another's shoes. Thoughts?
    _Black Like Me_ by John Howard Griffin (a white American journalist).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Like_Me

    Beatrice Potter (who's not the author of the 'Peter Rabbit' stories) was a
    daughter of a wealthy businessman (the chairman of a railway). She
    became interested in social reform and decided to investigate the working
    conditions of poorer young women. Impersonating (I doubt that she was
    cut out for a career as an actress) a working-class girl, Beatrice Potter
    found employment in some sweatshops. Apparently being unable to conceal
    her beauty, intelligence, and education enough, she tended to find herself
    (according to a biographer) being singled out as the prospective bride of
    the sweatshop owner's son-and-heir, thus impelling her to quit her job.
  8. 07 Mar '14 21:40
    When I got married, I soon discovered from talking to my wife about experiences, that we could go through an experience together and come away from it with completely different views, partly because we were different sexes, partly different skin colour, partly different cultures.
    I think it is really difficult to genuinely experience another persons life in all its fullness, but I also think that we should try to do the little we can here and there so that we have a clearer understanding of the world and other peoples experiences in it.
    I think at least occasionally socializing with people of a different religion/culture/race/social class/sex than yourself is important. Also, I think everyone should spend a little time in a foreign country.
  9. 08 Mar '14 00:29
    Originally posted by bill718
    No Whodey, it's not "all Bush's fault" or anyone's fault for that matter. As usual you've missed the point altogether. It's about seeing and experiencing things from the point of view of someone other than yourself. It's sad that I need to spell this out for you.
    That's cause your not walking in my shoes.
  10. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    08 Mar '14 02:16
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in their shoes.

    That way if they don't like your criticism, at least you are a mile away and have their shoes.
    Is that a "Deep Thought"?
  11. 08 Mar '14 18:53
    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/feb/13/women-rule-world-oppressed-majority

    'What would life be like if women really did rule the world?'
    --Sadhbh Walshe
  12. 08 Mar '14 19:04
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    When I got married, I soon discovered from talking to my wife about experiences, that we could go through an experience together and come away from it with completely different views, partly because we were different sexes, partly different skin colour, partly different cultures.
    I think it is really difficult to genuinely experience another persons life ...[text shortened]... n yourself is important. Also, I think everyone should spend a little time in a foreign country.
    'I think everyone should spend a little time in a foreign country.'
    --Twhitehead

    Why not learn another language? Singapore requires its students to
    learn at least two languages.

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/mar/08/us-english-second-language-singapore
  13. 08 Mar '14 19:15
    Originally posted by bill718
    I often wonder what our world and our attitudes would be like is we were forced to live anothers life, who's opinions differed form ours for a month...

    * If someone who could never afford to go to college traded places with a med student from a wealthy family, amid severe parental and professional expectations, who was just informed his grades were not ad ...[text shortened]... keyboards and type our opinions, but what if we had to walk a mile in another's shoes. Thoughts?
    If bullfrogs had wings.....they wouldn't bump their tush on the ground.

    Many people have lived in many of those circumstances that you list at different times in their lives, periods exceeding a month. In early 1994 I was working 80 to 90 hours a week, and took on an extra part time job at minimum wage. I quit when my objective was met, and went back to my squishy 80 to 90 hours per week.

    Face it, government can't solve all the problems and inequities of life. More often than not it may increase them.
  14. 08 Mar '14 19:24
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Because a very large part of suffering involves your long term outlook on life, a months swop just wouldn't be the same. If you know you are going back to your old life, you won't experience the feeling of hopelessness that many people in the world have - especially the poor and uneducated.

    There was a time when I live in Ndola, Zambia, and a friend an ...[text shortened]... eye opener and it was amazing just how wrong my impression of the place was before I came here.
    I have an acquaintance whose son moved to SA Joberg, to marry an upper class Zulu girl from the coast. He is well paid, and still laments conveniences and comforts which were commonplace even in Detroit.

    He lives in a section which was once the gated enclave of white supremacists, which seems attractive and nice except that from pictures and his mother's confirmation is a bit like a prison.

    My point is that nowhere is everyone satisfied. And most improvements will come from individual efforts not from symbolic gestures like walking in another's shoes.
  15. 08 Mar '14 19:36
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Is that a "Deep Thought"?
    Just a bit of somewhat dated humour.