Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Standard memberRajk999
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    26 Jun '17 22:51
    Originally posted by shavixmir
    The German police carry guns.
    What are you on about?
    And the British?
  2. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    27 Jun '17 00:06
    Originally posted by Rajk999
    I wish we had some US police down here in Trinidad. 500 violent murders every year in a pop of 1.3 M.
    Filipino police sound like they could help you out.
  3. Standard memberRajk999
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    27 Jun '17 02:23
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Filipino police sound like they could help you out.
    Maybe .. certainly not police from a low crime country
  4. Zugzwang
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    27 Jun '17 19:34
    Originally posted by Suzianne to Rajk999
    Be careful what you wish for.
    US police have a pretty poor record of "protecting and serving" anyone who is not white.
    When the (white-dominated) mainstream US media covers the subject of why Asian-Americans
    tend to be reluctant to get involved with American police, their favorite explanation is that
    Asian-Americans may be unreasonably afraid of American police only because they have had
    bad experiences with repressive or corrupt police in Asian societies. This 'explanation'
    ignores the fact that most Asian-Americans are not immigrants and have no experiences with Asian police.
    It also ignores the fact that Asian Americans may have many experiences of racism in the USA,
    including with racist American police.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chol_Soo_Lee

    "Chol Soo Lee was a Korean American immigrant who was wrongfully convicted for the 1973 murder
    of Yip Yee Tak, a San Francisco Chinatown gang leader, and sentenced to life in prison.
    While in prison, he was sentenced to death for the killing of another prisoner, Morrison Needham,
    though Chol Soo claimed self-defense. Chol Soo served ten years of his sentence for
    the killing of Yip Yee Tak of which he was later acquitted, eight of those on death row."

    "Lee did not receive an apology or compensation from the state."

    "The 1989 film True Believer is loosely based on Lee's retrial and acquittal."
  5. Subscribersonhouse
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    27 Jun '17 19:433 edits
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    When the (white-dominated) mainstream US media covers the subject of why Asian-Americans
    tend to be reluctant to get involved with American police, their favorite explanation is that
    Asian-Americans may be unreasonably afraid of American police only because they have had
    bad experiences with repressive or corrupt police in Asian societies. This 'expla ...[text shortened]... om the state."

    "The 1989 film True Believer is loosely based on Lee's retrial and acquittal."
    I don't know that case but it looks like he committed a murder while incarcerated. If he was exonerated of the charge that got him incarcerated and was aquitted how could he be a free man? He would have committed a REAL murder this time. And it would be up to him to prove self defense, wounds on his body, a weapon recoverd belonging to the victim, SOMETHING to corroborate the self defense plea. If he was convicted of the second crime he would of course not get an apology or compensation but I of course am just looking at your words and have no idea of the reality of his claims.

    I would think he would only get compensation for being in prison if the results of that trial made him a free man and that didn't happen.
  6. Zugzwang
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    27 Jun '17 20:10
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I don't know that case but it looks like he committed a murder while incarcerated. If he was exonerated of the charge that got him incarcerated and was aquitted how could he be a free man? He would have committed a REAL murder this time. And it would be up to him to prove self defense, wounds on his body, a weapon recoverd belonging to the victim, SOMETHIN ...[text shortened]... ion for being in prison if the results of that trial made him a free man and that didn't happen.
    Such miscomprehensions! Please read more carefully the Wikipedia article that I cited.

    "On October 8, 1977, Lee killed Morrison Needham in a prison yard altercation. Lee, who claimed
    self-defense, was charged with murder with special circumstances, which calls for the death penalty."

    " On January 14, 1983, California's 3rd District Court of Appeal nullified Chol Soo Lee's
    death sentence for the Needham stabbing, citing the Stockton trial judge's incorrect jury
    instructions, and for allowing hearsay testimony in the death penalty phase of the trial."

    "The prosecution moved to retry Lee on the prison killing charge. Lee's co-counsels were
    able to plea bargain on the Needham case. Lee, who had served nearly ten years in prison,
    was given credit for time served and freed from prison."

    1) Chol Soo Lee (who claimed self-defense) was convicted of killing another prisoner in a fight.
    2) His conviction was overturned on appeal.
    3) The prosecution wanted to retry Lee, who insisted upon his innocence.
    4) Lee had to choose between going to trial, which meant the risk of losing and getting a long sentence,
    or making a deal. He already had spent ten years in prison for a murder of which he was eventually acquitted.
    So, not wanting to do any more time, Lee agreed to plead guilty for a sentence of time served (ten years).
    Then Lee was immediately released.

    By the way, as far I can recall, the character based upon Lee is a minor figure in the film
    'True Believer', which is really much more about his white lawyer.

    .
  7. Zugzwang
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    29 Jun '17 18:20
    By the way, there was a case where an Asian-American was convicted upon the basis of
    being identified by a white witness (who claimed the criminal was Asian) from a police line-up.
    Although he had no alibi, there was no corroborating physical evidence of his guilt.
    He appealed his conviction upon the basis that the police line-up was biased against him.
    He was the *only* Asian in that line-up; the other men shown to the witness were blacks or Latinos.
    So his lawyer argued that the witness would pick the one who looked closest to Asian,
    and everyone else in the line-up was obviously not Asian. The prosecution argued that
    the police could not find any other Asians to put into that line-up, and it was fair enough
    for purposes of identification because everyone in it was non-white.

    Various studies have found that witnesses tend to be less accurate at recognizing people of other races.
    The police line-up would have been fair only if it had consisted of all Asians of similar appearance.
  8. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    29 Jun '17 22:251 edit
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Filipino police sound like they could help you out.
    http://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/philippines-duterta-doa/

    Since late 2016, police have delivered hundreds of drug suspects to Manila hospitals. A Reuters investigation has revealed almost all were dead on arrival. Witnesses and family members say they were executed and their bodies removed from the scene in a police cover up.
  9. Standard memberRajk999
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    30 Jun '17 03:07
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    http://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/philippines-duterta-doa/

    Since late 2016, police have delivered hundreds of drug suspects to Manila hospitals. A Reuters investigation has revealed almost all were dead on arrival. Witnesses and family members say they were executed and their bodies removed from the scene in a police cover up.
    Yep.. we need some of that down here
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    30 Jun '17 15:08
    Originally posted by Rajk999
    Yep.. we need some of that down here
    yes, due process is for wimps. everybody knows each cop is qualified to make life and death decisions on the spot and deliver swift justice to the guilty
  11. Standard memberRajk999
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    30 Jun '17 17:05
    Originally posted by Zahlanzi
    yes, due process is for wimps. everybody knows each cop is qualified to make life and death decisions on the spot and deliver swift justice to the guilty
    In this environment .. yeah. Not in yours. It's a war down here... and war rules apply
  12. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    01 Jul '17 16:57
    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-mexico-violence-idUSKBN19M3OE?il=0

    Nineteen people were killed in Mexico's northern state of Sinaloa late on Friday in a run of related shootouts between police and gunmen, state authorities said.
    Armed men in pickup trucks approached police on a major highway near the city of Mazatlan and began firing at them, according to press releases from the state police and state attorney general's office.
    Aided by federal forces, the police fought off the attackers and pursued them to the nearby town of La Amapa, where the gunfight resumed.
    Seventeen people were killed in the shootouts with police, and another two were killed nearby in what appear to be earlier, related shootings, the attorney general's office said.
    Five police suffered gunshots and are in stable condition, with two of those officers suffering head wounds, according to state police. Sinaloa is a major battleground in Mexico's drug war.
    Found at the scene were 16 semiautomatic rifles, seven handguns and a shotgun, the attorney general's office said.
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